Rich Cardona Media

146. How to Leave Soul-Destroying Work with Lea Turner

“For me, the risk is in how I will feel if I don’t try.” – Lea Turner

On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with entrepreneur and LinkedIn coach Lea Turner about having the courage to take risks and pursue your passion. Listen in as Rich and Lea discuss the value of thinking differently, the power of being genuine, and how to find your niche.

Lea Turner is the owner of Stereotype Ltd, which originally focused on audio transcription, but in 2020 diversified into LinkedIn training thanks to Lea’s breakout success on the platform, growing from just 400 connections to over 57,000 in 12 months. She coaches individuals and businesses to help them utilize the platform to create inbound leads and opportunities with the strong networks she shows them how to create. She also is an active fundraiser for mental health and children’s charities.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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  • 00:18 – Introduction
  • 05:00 – How Lea pivoted to becoming an entrepreneur
  • 12:44 – Escaping of the soul-crushing grind
  • 16:01 – The value of thinking differently
  • 20:25 – How Lea’s unconventional look has affected her journey
  • 24:50 – The power of being genuine
  • 27:39 – Creativity and learning
  • 34:20 – Having the confidence to take risks
  • 43:07 – Lea’s advice for people trying to find their niche
  • 46:13 – Staying grounded after success
  • 51:27 – Where to find Lea online
  • 53:12 – Rich’s closing remarks

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Here is how to connect with Lea:

LinkedIn

Instagram

Website

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Transcript
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Welcome back to the leadership locker.

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It is your host rich donut, and you are in the right place.

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If you're a new entrepreneur, aspiring entrepreneur, a seasoned entrepreneur.

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Looking to gain knowledge from industry experts and influencers

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from all kinds of niches.

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Uh, and I'm also going to be on here on Mondays and Fridays sharing

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lessons learned, documenting the journey and all that, but we're

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going to get into my guest, who is Leah Turner based out of the UK.

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Well, someone I noticed on LinkedIn who, who stood out tremendously and for

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whatever reason, it took me a while to start actually consuming the content I was

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too absorbed and trying to make sure my content popped until as great creators.

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Do they show up in your feed over and over and over and over.

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And Leah's LinkedIn knowledge, her posts her.

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Copy her.

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Look, her voice.

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All of it was just like, whoa, this is different.

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And look, there's some people killing it on LinkedIn.

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There's some women, uh, who are awesome craters on LinkedIn, but

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I'm just not sure Leah has deep competition, like straight up.

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So when I found out about a LinkedIn international clubhouse group that

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I was part of or participated in.

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Daily for, uh, you know, almost a couple months, it was a, with a few other

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people and I was a moderator, you know, up there with Leah and some others.

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And it was great because it was a way to, for us to get to know each other,

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uh, as people who were kind of obsessive about LinkedIn or base a lot of, uh,

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some of our business off of link.

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Well, listening to the way people in the audience ask questions when they came

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up on stage and listening to how she answered them, listening to just kind

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of the manner in which she was able to combine knowledge, humor, being casual,

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and also from time to time being kind of a hammer if she had to, which was rare.

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But, uh, we talk about it in the podcast, but it was clear to me that

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she's just on a different level.

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So everything that I had seen was now confirmed by having

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these daily interactions with.

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And then ultimately I actually got to see one of her products

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because obviously we're friends.

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So here we are on Instagram and I'm, DM-ing her.

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I was kind of just stuck.

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And I mean, look, if you're a content creator, it's easy to get stuck.

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And I got stuck and Leah was happy to hook me up with one of

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her guides that had some prompts.

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And I was like done that on that.

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And then I was like, haven't done that.

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Haven't done that.

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Well, and, and I would look at a prompt and it would bring me to

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a bunch of different memories of personal professional experiences

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that I knew would make good content.

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So I went out and made a bunch of a batch content and a bunch of them were

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derived from some of the prompts Leah gave me and look like this is one of

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those things where even if you are.

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Good in your opinion at LinkedIn or create or an expert or whatever

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it is, you should always be open to others who are doing the same thing.

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And it's like game recognizes game type situation.

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And look, this confirmed.

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So like not only did I see her content and just be like, wow, she really stands out.

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And I got to interact with her.

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Get to know her, hear her interact with the others.

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That was fantastic.

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And then when I saw her product, I'm like, look, she's got the trifecta going on.

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She can educate, she can entertain.

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Uh, she's extremely, extremely talented.

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And the thing is like, she's just kind of getting started.

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All right.

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She's a year into this and this is one of those, uh, I don't want to

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say unicorns, but this is just one of those situations that people.

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Would look at it and be like, oh, I can too.

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And yes, you can too.

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But look, she's been like someone who's been waiting to get let out of

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the cage for a minute, as you'll see.

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And she was someone who was living her life, trying to prove people

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wrong and exceed expectations until suddenly this blessing in disguise of

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COVID really unearthed, just complete.

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We different person who's potential for marketing and business.

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Just transcended into a business.

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That's just.

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There's no other way to say it.

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So look, check it out and look, I have to say this, disclaimer, we're not going to

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get into LinkedIn tactics, go to LinkedIn.

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There's plenty of people on there you go.

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Watch YouTube videos.

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You can watch them on my YouTube videos.

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If you want on LinkedIn, this is not about LinkedIn.

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This is about making a transition in your life.

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This is about now how to implement instinctual success and how to kind of

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translate that into education for others.

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This is about recognizing yourself and what you're meant to do.

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And this is about determining what success means to you and how

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it differs from everyone else.

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This is about being an individual feeling completely comfortable in your own skin.

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And no one does it better than Leah.

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So let's go.

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So we just did our intro.

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We got Leah on Lee.

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I'm going to do what men are not supposed to do to women, which

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has asked them how old they are.

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How old are you?

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36.

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And I just saw you posted not long ago on Instagram that a

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year ago I was doing X, Y, and Z.

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And the reason I mentioned your age is because you and I had similar pivots

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at similar times in our life, I was 38.

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Something has to happen where.

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Uh, I like to call it a flash point.

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You know, where, where something happens, where you're just like,

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fuck this it's time for a change.

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So tell everyone, number one, what you were doing a year ago, and then

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we could kind of get into what you're doing now and all the different

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things that have taken place ever since you kind of freed yourself.

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So, I guess with just over a year ago now, but, but I was still doing it a year ago.

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Um, so I was basically taking interviews and podcasts and, uh, building surveys

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and all sorts of really fascinating stuff.

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Wasn't fascinating at all.

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It allowed me to learn, but it wasn't very interesting and I spent 10 hours.

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Yeah.

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Typing what other people were saying.

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That was my life.

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And it was fine because it allowed me to be a bit of a digital

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nomad and worked for myself.

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Um, I did it by accident.

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I fell into, I started doing it as a side hustle and it

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became successful quite quickly.

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And so it ended up my main hustle within, in, under a year.

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And I left my job and then I just sort of thought that was it.

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That was my pinnacle.

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And I thought I got stuck in the truck cause in the UK, when I.

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I had my son, um, I became what we call the benefit trap where

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I'm, because I'm self employed.

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I'm earning enough to keep me going, but not, but I'm still

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getting a manageable for assistance.

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So I was getting help from the government to pay my rent as a

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lone parent with only one income.

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And that income was okay, but it wasn't enough to cover everything.

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So they gave me assistance, but it meant that if I try to save up to buy it.

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If I have more than 16,000 pounds in my account, they

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would take the benefits away.

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So then I'd have to pay for everything myself, and then I'd have no savings left.

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So I couldn't save to buy a house.

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So you can penalize for getting your shit together, so to

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speak what we're putting together.

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So I buy a house.

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You didn't have it, but I'm just saying, if you made adult decisions

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and they're like, cool, I want a house now, by the way, we're taking your bed.

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Yeah.

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So then, then I'd have to find double the amount of money for my rent and more money

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to, for childcare and all these things.

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So my savings would have been eradicated so you couldn't get out of it.

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So I just ended up using any extra money that I managed to put together to go

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on holidays and we'd have adventures.

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It worked.

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Um, and then COVID hit and that business that I'd worked so hard on for years.

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And I had a team of five people that had just I'd started getting worked

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for them as well through LinkedIn.

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Um, I got lots more business and was growing the business and I

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was thinking, oh, you know, maybe there's a, a viable future in this.

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And then COVID hit.

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And none of my clients could see their clients.

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So they weren't generating work for me.

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And I kept enough work coming in for me.

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But not for my team.

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Most of them were homeschooling their children and didn't

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have time to work anyway.

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So then I started to panic.

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I was like, okay, there's not really any future in this business.

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I I'm, I've reached my limit.

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Like I could grow, but I'm never going wear a massive mall.

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And I'm always going to have to work really hard because there's not much

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of a margin on transcription work.

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So because of COVID I had to kind of think outside of the.

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And because I was having a lot of success on LinkedIn in generating leads.

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A lot of people were coming to me and asking for advice.

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And then when I gave them advice and they followed it, they were

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finding it really worked and they were generating work as well.

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So I thought, Hey, maybe I can make enough money to pay for a holiday,

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or at least keep things going until business gets back to normal.

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And COVID sort of goes away.

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And that was.

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session for somebody and said, Hey, do you think you pay for this?

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And they went, yeah, definitely.

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Definitely.

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So I charged started charging 99 pounds for an hour.

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Um, for context, I was probably making about 120 pounds

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per day with transcription.

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So for me, I'm charging 99 pounds for one hour of my time was like

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mind blowing, like really mind.

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So I started offering that out in the end of may last year.

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And I got booked up very quickly and I found that I was booking

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two or three sessions a day and I was making a lot of extra money.

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Then I think it was about August, a few people who I'd coached had

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said, you're not charging enough.

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You're providing so much value.

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This is outrageous that you're charging 99 pounds.

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So I put very reluctantly because I felt deeply uncomfortable from

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my own like money issues, because I was raised without much money.

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I reluctantly put my prices up to 199 pounds for an hour and a half of my time.

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And very quickly I was booked up like completely booked up.

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And I was doing that thing.

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When someone starts adding lots of money, I was like, oh my

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God, just before the sessions.

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But as many as people can give me and I was booking.

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Two, sometimes three a day.

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And I was like, oh my God, all this money is coming.

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And this is amazing.

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I'm going to be able to save for her.

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And it just kept coming.

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The work kept coming and I started creating resources that would help

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other people to create great content for LinkedIn and train them how to like,

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what is good content so that they didn't have to always think of their own ideas.

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And those went down amazingly.

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I sold one of them because it's not cheap.

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And I was sold over a hundred of them in the first couple of months.

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And that was like 10,000 pounds I'd made from, from those

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on its own and the context.

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That's what I used to make in like in more than six months, it used to take me.

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So like I would probably in a year make about 12, 12, 13,000 pounds.

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Yeah, I want to go kind of back all the way back to the transcription piece.

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Like, okay.

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Clearly a lot of us had to pivot during COVID, but your emotional and

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time investment and building a team.

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And you know, some of these people now are under unique circumstances where you

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can support them and everything else.

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Was there any part of you that was.

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Then not now, but then that was like, this is a blessing in disguise because

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I'm not really feeling that I'm doing it, but I'm not sure I'm feeling it.

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I had been thinking that for awhile.

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I mean, because of my situation as a lone parent and because I could work from home.

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And because of the benefits that I was getting, I was trapped.

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So if I had gone to get an employed position, I would have

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been earning too much, by the way, the tax system works in the UK.

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If I'm earning 25 grand as a salary, I wouldn't have been entitled to

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benefits, but if I'm earning 25,000 pounds as a self-employed person,

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obviously they're taking all the deductions out for hope, working at home.

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So what of my business expenses come out of that and the profit after that

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is what they put down as my earnings.

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And then I get the tax.

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So if I'd gone into employee position, I would've lost my money and I wouldn't have

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been able to afford to live how we were living and read the house we were renting.

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Um, so it was, I was stuck.

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And I didn't want to do transcription anymore.

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I was struggling with a lot of back pain.

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I was having severe shoulder pain and I was visiting a chiropractor for it.

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My hands had started seizing and I was having really bad pains in my hands

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and my arms to the point I was using like strapping on my hands and taking

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really strong anchors because 10 years of typing and I typed crazy fast.

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It really, it's not good for your muscles.

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So I was physically and mentally drained from doing it for so long.

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Physically sounds like a shit show.

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Okay.

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And then you're talking about on the actual compensation side, like

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it's a lose lose in a way, right?

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Like you can't scale because then you'll get kind of kicked to the bottom.

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Talk to me about the energy in which you approach the work itself though.

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I mean like, and the reason I say this is because I think a lot of

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us as entrepreneurs, including me may start whatever business or our

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second business or third business or whatever, and be like, this was fun.

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Next and it doesn't mean it's a life sentence, whatever it is

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you settle on in the beginning.

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So can you talk to me about where you were as far as like B having a passion

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or energy to just do that aside from the financial barriers and the physical.

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Yeah, I didn't have any passion for it anymore.

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Um, what I enjoyed was working with the people and I enjoyed being in

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control of my own life, but the actual work I found soul-destroying if I'm

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completely honest, like I really liked the clients that I worked for, but

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typing up medical reports about cars.

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So long every day or focus groups.

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I mean, I did focus groups on experiences with banks or, you

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know, motorway service stations and jewelry, boutiques, and groups of

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people talking about what they do.

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And don't like in a jewelry shop.

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I'm like, oh my God.

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It was so hard to stay motivated and I would, it would be really a

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struggle for me to focus for long periods of time and I'd have to do

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them in bite size chunks because I was just, oh my Lord, this is so dull.

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And it did become soldiering.

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It was, and it was too easy.

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I wasn't challenged.

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And I'm the kind of person that I, I thrive on learning new things.

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And that's probably the only thing that kept me.

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Remotely interested in able to do it was because I was learning every day.

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So while I might not have been doing something that particularly interested me,

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my brain was still reasonably stimulated in those learning about new things, new

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products, new, new ways of thinking.

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And especially when I did interviews and podcasts, I found what I was listening to.

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Interesting.

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Um, and I watched some, some amazing projects over the year.

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So it wasn't, it wasn't.

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But I think when I logged on to LinkedIn and I started seeing other

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people like me, um, and I started realizing that there was more.

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But I was able to do, and this is, I guess, where it might go a little bit

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deep, but I have, I mean, for anybody that hasn't seen me, that's listening

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to this, I'm got bright blonde hair.

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I've got tattoos from my chin to my toes, to my fingertips.

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I've got stretched earlobes.

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I don't look corporate.

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And so I left school at 16.

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I dropped out at 16 due to my own mental health and that education just

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not being right for me at that point.

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And I was told, yeah.

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Without question that I would never work in corporate.

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I would never have a good job unless I pursued university in college without

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qualifications and without training, I would never make it in life.

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And that was my prophecy.

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And I fulfilled it.

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I did small office jobs and I worked in shops and cafes and pubs.

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And then I started like being an office manager for a small company.

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And then I have my little typing business.

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So that was it for me, that was, I felt with the transcription business side

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achieved more than people expected me to.

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Does it

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matter though?

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This is so interesting.

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I mean like where you like, cool, fuck you like proved you wrong or did you

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realize during the duration of you proving others wrong and exceeding

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expectations to an extent that you were like, which I kind of feel like

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this is rhetorical, but I don't know.

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Here in the last year, you were just like, I never needed to be doing that.

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I could have been doing this the whole time.

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I could have been doing exactly whatever I

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wanted there.

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Wishing I had pushed the boundary sooner, but I felt like I was pushing the

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boundaries by starting my own business at 26 and running my own business and

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getting by and being able to afford it.

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I mean, I had to scrape and be very careful with my money, but I afforded

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some amazing adventures with my son.

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And for me, it was just like, I never expected to be able to do these things.

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And I felt like I had achieved a lot.

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I've always known I had an unusual brain.

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Like I've always known that I react to things and see things in a slightly

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different way to other people.

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I've not ever really thought too much about it.

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I've just put it down to me being a bit quirky.

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And then I logged on to LinkedIn and I'm surrounded by other entrepreneurs

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who also a lot of them have ADHD, quite high functioning anxiety, and

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all the different things that I didn't even really understand or know of.

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And suddenly I wasn't quirky anymore.

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I was just normal and my brain moving so rapidly all the time and

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my inability to focus and constantly having ideas bouncing about my brain.

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I went, I'm not weird.

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I'm a no.

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And so when I started trying to do something more and when I started

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training with LinkedIn and all these more ideas came to me and my

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natural ability to market myself and.

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It was like the stars aligned in all the experiences I have had over the years

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aligned to one thing that I was really good at and being able to then leverage

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it and turn into a successful business.

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Yeah.

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It's just, it does feel like all the stars aligned just at the right time.

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And then COVID came along and gave me that push and said, You've got to,

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because I said there was a few people around me who I friended on LinkedIn

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that said to me, one person in particular that said, don't train LinkedIn.

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It's so cliche, people will laugh at you.

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You've only been doing it for six months.

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What can you possibly know?

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And I thankfully didn't listen and did it anyway.

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And you know, I've had a fair amount of success with it.

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Yeah.

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There's a couple things I want to talk about.

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So, so one is you started to.

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Say to yourself, like I can teach this and I'm going to do it

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for 99 pounds and whatever, but what were the indicators to you?

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And this is just, uh, for entrepreneurs listening.

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Like this does not have to be social media specific.

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We have clearly had some signals that this is something she could charge for

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not only by the help she was giving, but what were some of the indicators

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in terms of maybe engagement, following connection, things like that, that

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kind of gave you that push as well.

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In addition to COVID right.

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I got something

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here.

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I started posting regularly on LinkedIn in about October 20, 19.

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And within two months I'd gone from 400 followers to over 10,000.

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Um, which I didn't know was unusual.

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Hello, chasing numbers.

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I wasn't looking at my follower count and it wasn't till somebody

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said to me, Ridiculously fast.

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I went, is it because I'm not one of those people that's like

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watching the numbers go up?

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I, it, wasn't why I was on LinkedIn.

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I was on LinkedIn to generate some new business for my typing business.

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And so I think by the time I started training people on LinkedIn, I

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was at about 20,000 followers and I'd had 60 or 70 inbound clients

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in the space of about five years.

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And, and it was easy for me.

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I've never done any cold outreach.

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People just wanted to reach out.

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They remembered what I did.

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My content was generating a lot of business for me.

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And that's why I guess I started realizing that content came easily

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to me selling myself without being Tsosie came easy to me.

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And when I guided other people to do it, They were having success using my

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methods, not my methods, but methods that I was using, the other people teach, but

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I was having success teaching as well.

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So it was natural either.

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I didn't know I had,

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so here's something that's really important.

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I, for, for people listening, I know we are well and looking at you and

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knowing you and everything like that.

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I also know that you've encountered some of the bullshit that goes on, on some of

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these social media platforms, but really, you know, we know it exists on LinkedIn

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where you kind of mentioned it earlier.

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You're tatted up you're blonde blue eyes.

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You have.

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Big breasts.

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I mean, you know what I'm saying?

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Like, I have to say it because like people you've gotten messages and

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shared messages about this, right?

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There's all these things that people who would probably never intend to

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buy from you anyway, would attribute to the reason that you're getting

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any engagement, which couldn't be fucking further from the truth.

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So when you're starting to have success and you're like, okay, I'm getting

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inbound leads, I'm getting followers, but then there's that other camp of people.

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Who are kind of reigning on this parade?

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You said the stars aligned and then all of a sudden at the same

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time, it's like, wait a second.

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There's trolls, like here I am arriving.

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And you're trying to take it away.

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Talk to me about that experience.

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And if you ever feel the inclination to prove them wrong again, other

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people wrong again, because of how you.

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I think I've always had a certain amount of stereotyping because of the way I look.

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And actually a lot of people misconstrued the way I choose to

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present myself as wanting attention.

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I started getting tattoos for the opposite reason.

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When I started getting tattoos 20 years ago, women weren't very often tattooed.

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It was a way of keeping people away.

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Certainly not a way of getting attention.

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I wanted people to stay away from me and I had black hair and baggy clothes.

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And I didn't because I started getting male attention when I

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was about 13, 14, and I hated it.

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So I covered myself up and I hit myself and I learned in my twenties that I

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wasn't going to be like that anymore.

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And I was just going to be who I was, screw what anybody else thought.

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Um, and so now I'm comfortable in my own skin.

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And what wound me up, I think was, you know, any woman who has small breasts

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on who isn't conventionally attractive, could post a picture of herself

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holding an ice cream in a vest top.

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And no one would say that she was.

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Trying to sell her image.

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But if I do it because of how it look, I'm accused of trying to sell my appearance,

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my business with my parents, but it's only based on how people perceive me.

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Not, not, it's not my fault that I look the way I look, I look the

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way I look because that's just, you know, I've got the genetics.

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My family gave me and I like to be tattoo.

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If I'm pictured in a vest top holding an ice cream, I'm going to look set.

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I'm going to be received a certain way.

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That's different to how she is, but I'm going to be accused of harnessing my

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appearance to market my business because of how they perceive me when actually

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I'm not doing anything more than she is.

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We're doing the exact same thing.

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We're just being the face of our brand and sharing it.

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We're having an ice cream on a Sunday afternoon is a big thing.

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I've had women message me that they don't like that I need to

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show cleavage to sell my, my, the majority of my clients are women.

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Yes.

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Women, not men.

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I do work with a lot of, yeah, but they are all respectful.

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Um, the majority are women, so their theory that it's all, it's,

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it's all based on my appearance.

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It's not all based on my parents.

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And if it was all based on my appearance, then the methods that I'm teaching,

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wouldn't be working for 60 year old men.

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Yes.

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I'm not going to deny how I look.

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Has definitely aided me in the growth of my business, but for the first, probably

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the first eight or so months, I never ever put a video on LinkedIn where you

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could see below my collar bone, because I was very conscious of the fact that

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people would make that assumption.

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The, if I showed my ample chest, not like having out, but if I had

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any sort of tat it, even just in a t-shirt people would make assumptions.

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And then I decided, well, actually I'm not going to edit how I behave

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because I do wear vest, tops and jeans.

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And I do rock around in band t-shirts or gym wear.

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Like I don't, I'm not a corporate, I don't wear a suit and I don't dress in a two.

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Twin Pete satin pearls.

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That's not me.

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And that was never me.

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And I'm not going to change myself to avoid trolls, making nasty judge.

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Yeah.

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And I mean, I think, I think all it takes is an interaction with you

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to, to realize that that's accurate.

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And it's really, I mean, the bullshit meter never flutters, uh, when I'm

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talking to you or when I feel like other people interact with you and

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I feel like that's amazing, but I want to talk about you saying how you

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understood how to market yourself.

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Especially.

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I mean, and I know you're on Tik TOK and, and Instagram as well, and you're

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doing very well there, but on LinkedIn specifically where your business has

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exploded again, it's one of those situations where you're kind of coming in

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and you say I'm around people like me who are entrepreneurs, but you're not around

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people like you because it is the kind of the buttoned up platform, so to speak.

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And I think people like you and I try and dispel that rumor like,

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look, it's a place for everyone.

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But at the same time, if you look at some of the other female creators

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out there, there's no one that looks like you or anything like that.

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So what do you say to women who maybe have edge or just their own takes on

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things, but feel like they kind of got to really be maybe more entertaining

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and slightly buttoned up, like a lot of the other creators out there that way.

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I say, you're doing yourself a disservice because you're pretending to, you're

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trying to please people that aren't going to be pleased by you not being yourself.

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You will.

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I mean, one of the beauties of being my entirely myself on LinkedIn, and I say

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that like, we all have to slightly edit ourselves on LinkedIn because it is quite

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censored and you have to, and we have to be careful what you get for you though.

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Generally speaking, I'm a good sort of 97% me on there.

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And I think the beauty of it is I never come face to face on a zoom

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call with somebody that I don't like because everybody buys because

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they know who I am and they want to work with me based on that.

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So I know that I'm going to like them.

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They're my dream clients, because we have fun.

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And every second.

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Fun is always fun.

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So I think when you are a hundred percent or as close as you can

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be a hundred percent yourself.

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You attract those dream clients that cannot wait to work with you.

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And what's better, even if you don't like your job very much.

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If you're working with people that you adore working with,

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it's fun and you can enjoy it.

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So for me, I've spent so many years doing a job that didn't fulfill me and

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didn't challenge me and I worked alone.

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Cool the time, because it's a very lonely job transcribing.

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And now I get to socialize every day with new people.

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I'm face-to-face with a new person on a daily basis.

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And especially during COVID as a lone parent, I was on my own.

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Like there were no grownups able to have conversations.

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We as adults on a daily basis was a saving grace for me.

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Yeah.

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So clearly we know, you know, LinkedIn in and out and that you can help

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people achieve various degrees of goals that they hope to achieve from

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a professional platform like that.

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I know I've seen you on other platforms and it's equally

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captivating and entertaining.

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But there's more.

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And we talked about it before we were recording where you're working on several

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other things and things, certain things you can't necessarily talk about, but

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where you said to yourself, and I wrote it down, I keep saying smart stuff.

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And you're like, I'm like, who is that saying smart stuff.

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And then the second thing you said was it's kind of like

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an out of body experience.

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And the reason I wanted to bring this up, and the reason I wrote

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that down immediately was because.

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Your pre-business success.

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So to speak was predicated on really transactional ish work, this desire of

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yours to really tap into your creativity seems to have grown it as well.

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Can you talk to me about, what's been on folding in terms of your

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business acumen and your creativity.

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One of the things that's come to the fore.

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Bear in mind.

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I have only ever worked with my own business really, and I had no concept

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of marketing or personal branding or anything before this, which I guess

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is mind blowing for a lot of people.

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One of the things that I've realized is part of my success is that I

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have never worked in corporate.

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So I've never felt the pressure to people please, or be part of

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a small cog in a huge machine.

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I've never been, I've never had that pressure.

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I didn't go to university.

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I dropped out of school at 16 because I didn't fit in and

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I've carried on, not fitting in.

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And I've learned to be okay with not fitting in.

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And that has definitely been a huge bonus because I don't do

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things the way other people do.

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And I haven't been influenced by other people's ways of doing things.

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I'm almost like brand new and fresh and untarnished in a lot of ways.

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So I did an in-person training event last summer.

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I've never even been to a training event.

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And I walked in there and I plugged my laptop in and I was

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like, but let's give it a go.

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I just released a digital course, which is being released amazingly.

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I've never done a digital.

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I've never even been through one of my own.

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I've never because I don't want to do it like everybody else.

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Yes.

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So I'm breaking the rules with everything and I'm doing it in my own

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way and I'm doing it based on impulse and what I see people want and what

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they like and how they respond to things and how they respond to me.

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And I'm absorbing all of that knowledge and I'm using it to

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create the things that I need.

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Like the content resources, all of my clients.

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It's content I struggled to come up with and I was like, well,

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Instagram do these content calendars.

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And there's nothing like it for LinkedIn.

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So I'm like, I'm going to make some, and no one else people were

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doing like individual prompts, but nothing like what I was creating.

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And I was not just helping people to create good content.

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I was teaching them what is good content and how they can perform it

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on the kinds of questions they need to think about around a subject and

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how to get that audience engaged.

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There was so much more to it and I'm.

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Do something.

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And I learned, and I do something and I learn because I'm, I'm

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surrounded by knowledge and people that know more than me.

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Absorbing it or constantly.

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That's how I learn

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instead of being intimidated by it, which is like the gift.

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That's the real

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gift, but I don't pretend to know everything.

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I went onto LinkedIn knowing that I was naive and willing to learn.

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And I said to somebody the other day, I posted a job ad because

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I recruiting for a PA who I have recruited and she starts next week.

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Um, Um, I, I didn't do a very good job.

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And instead of being kind and messaging me and saying, actually,

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you could have done this better.

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Here's an idea.

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A recruiter came onto it and said, this is a shit job out.

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It's a good job.

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You're good at LinkedIn.

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And I was like, that's not helpful.

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And I literally had said, I have never recruited before.

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I've never written a job out.

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I said that in the post, I was like, it's like, it's like pushing over a toddler.

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Who's learning to walk.

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Like, why, why wouldn't you say.

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You know, it's a good first try, but I was justice and the person was a recruiter.

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Like you were literally perfectly positioned to give me advice

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and say why it's not very good and how I could improve it.

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But instead you just decided to tell me it shit.

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Like what was the point of that?

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What positivity comes out.

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So I deleted the comment because I thought, well, there's no point

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in that person comment there.

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And I edited the post to try to make it better.

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And I recruited, so obviously I did a good job cause I got a member of staff from it.

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But the point, the point that I'm trying to make with that

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is that I am openly naive.

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And I don't pretend to know everything because I know that I've

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never been in these environments and everything is a new experience.

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I am, I'm laying the tracks.

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As I, as my runaway train is zooming along.

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Like I'm just, you know, constantly laying new tracks because I'm

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things are happening so fast for me.

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Business has grown and I'm like, Jesus, I need business insurance.

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I need this.

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And I need that.

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And I don't know about all of these things because I've never

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had to do any of this before.

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And, you know, everything is such a big new experience and it's intimidating.

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It's overwhelming, like mentally draining.

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So to have someone come along and just go, like you could have helped,

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you know, but I think that's been one of the strengths that people have

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resonated with as well on LinkedIn.

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And with the audience I feel is that I am openly naive.

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I don't pretend to have all the answers and I'm okay with the fact

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that I'm a 36 year old woman finding her way in the world of business.

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And it's a brand new territory for me and I don't shy away

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from being wrong or screwing up.

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And if I do, I do it with integrity and I own it and say, you know, I'm

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sorry, I didn't do that correctly.

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Let me put it right.

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You

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don't strike me as someone who has to say I'm sorry a lot anyway.

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I mean, just like, you're just.

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I'm

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I'm quite reasonably sensitive to people.

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Um, my emotional intelligence is very good, but I tend to approach a situation.

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Like I will put someone in their place in, uh, in his kind of, you see me?

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You guys are on clubhouse.

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Like I'll, I'll, uh, I'll put someone in that place or be quite up front with them.

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But I try to do it in a way that is kind of playful or, or

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reasonably charming, but helpful.

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Um, that's just my way.

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I'm quite cutthroat.

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Sometimes.

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I don't mean to be,

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it just happens.

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It sneaks up on us, but here's a couple of things I want to mention about what

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you were just talking about and you can disagree with my assertion if necessary.

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When you say you're openly naive.

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I resonate with that because I am, but I also want to know so much.

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I finally feel like I've arrived at a time in my life, but where I'm in

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a demeanor that allows me to absorb all the times I was supposed to be

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absorbing and never really worked out.

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So the reason I'm mentioning that is because I feel like you win because

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if you're openly naive and if you're in receive mode and you're gathering

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all this knowledge, I believe knowing you that there's a part of you,

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that's like, I'm going to close this gap on all you motherfuckers

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who really are formally educated in this and doing all these things.

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Like I'm doing it as we speak.

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So when you say you're building, laying the tracks on a runaway train, I agree,

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but I've believed that you're like that because you know, you could close the gap.

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Am I right?

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Or am I wrong?

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No.

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I know, I know I can.

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I asked me a year ago it would have set up suit, you know, way, but I have

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people who have like degrees and 20 years, I literally had a lady who's in

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marketing for 20 years, messaged me and just be like, you're absolutely amazing.

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I've got friends that work in marketing though.

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You are genius.

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It is.

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You just know, you just know and what you're doing, you know, what people want,

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you know, what people are going to respond to, you know, how to speak to people

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in a way that engages them and educates them and entertains them all at once.

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It's a gift and you're naturally good.

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Obviously it's one that I've been unaware of the majority of my life.

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And it's hard for me because I'm not that kind of person.

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Normally would be able to take those kinds of compliments.

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But I think I've got to a point now where I kind of, I need to stop playing this.

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Oh wow.

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This innocent little girl that's gone into business and gone.

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Oops.

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Look at me.

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I'm being super successful.

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Gosh, I don't know how this has happened.

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And I have to walk sort of step into my confidence to say,

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no, I'm actually needing this.

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I am going to be.

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I never, I, and that's, that's not from me.

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That's from the people around me.

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You're going to be, you're going to be very wealthy.

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That's not my goal.

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That's not where I'm.

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This is not the reason that I do what I do.

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I'm about to be able to buy a house.

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I cannot even explain to you how much that means is the lone parent.

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Who's grown up with nothing, you know, on government assistance that I'm going to

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be able to buy a four bedroom detached.

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This time last year, I never would've believed anybody that told

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me that in a million years, I never thought me and my son have moved

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six times and he's not even six yet.

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So for us, it's absolutely life changing, but I also know it's just the biggest.

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And I finally believe that what I'm building and I'm learning skills

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to diversify my income streams.

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I've got people grabbing at me from every direction because they

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want to do business partnerships.

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They want me to re represent their brands, all sorts of stuff.

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People are stepping at my heels, which is exciting and overwhelming.

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And I have to be very careful with what I'm saying.

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Yes.

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And where I put my energy because I still have a home to run and a

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child to raise dogs to care for.

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So, you know, my mine responsibilities are divided, but I know that I have, I

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had a conversation with my best friends that I've known for almost my whole life.

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And I said, I'm going to buy this house.

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I'm going to buy a house.

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And it's a four bedroom house and it's around 400,000 pounds.

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I know.

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Are you sure you need a four-bedroom house?

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If you're not get something cheaper?

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What if none of this works out?

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What if you don't?

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What if you know that all of this stops and you're not able

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to make the mortgage payments?

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I said, well, if that happens, I'll downsize my house, but at least I'm

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on the property ladder and I don't want to buy something small and then

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have to move in a couple of years.

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Yeah.

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But they don't understand what I do.

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And they don't really understand why it's so valuable because they're

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employed and their earnings are finite.

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They are on pottery.

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And they said to me, well, what if you can't afford it?

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I said, I'll always be able to afford it.

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But I said, if I, if I need more money, one month I do more coaching sessions.

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I do a group coaching.

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I sell more products.

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I advertise more.

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My earnings each month on are only based on how much time I have per week.

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To, um, when I've got my passive income, I'm working on passive income streams at

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the moment, my digital course is going to be going out automated and all of that.

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That's going to be making me enough to cover my mortgage on

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its own and having to have those conversations with employed people.

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They can't understand if I want to make an extra 5,000 pounds X month.

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I just do another five coaching sessions.

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This is so, so, so important for people to hear because you are

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hearing not, you're not hearing arrogance, you're hearing confidence.

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And more importantly, you're hearing what Andy Frisella likes to call the

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winner's mindset, which is someone who.

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Is like, of course I'm taking the risk because you don't look at it as a risk

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because you're betting on yourself.

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You're not putting it in someone else's hands for

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me.

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The risk is in how I will feel.

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If I don't try, that's a bigger risk.

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If I have this opportunity to become a millionaire.

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Buy a home that I can live in comfortably for the rest of my life and to move

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overseas and travel the world with my son.

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Maybe get speaking gigs all over the world, which is my real goal.

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I have my first one lined up next week, and then I've got some keynotes

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that are potentially being offered.

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I ha have been TEDx has been thrown around as a potential.

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I've been keyed up for that.

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Um, I want to get on stages and I want to travel.

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I want to take my son away.

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I want to travel the world together, doing what I'm passionate about and

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teaching people about the power of, of true human connection, whether you're

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online or in person networking and reading people to market better and

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creating content that speaks to people.

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That's what I'm passionate about.

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And that's what my natural ability is for.

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And I'm, I would regret it.

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I could never, ever, like if I hadn't taken the risk on jacking in my decent

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paid job to start my own business when I was 26 and they all said, are you sure?

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Are you sure you should do that?

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I was like, the worst comes to worst.

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I just get another job.

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Like if it goes wrong, I get another job.

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I moved to New Zealand when I was 24.

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I didn't like it.

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And I came back after six months, I gave up my job and my car because why not?

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What was stopping me?

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My friend said, are you sure you can manage with a baby on your own?

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When I was 29 and I went, yeah, I'll be fine.

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Obviously there's no going back for that one, but if I

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want something, it will happen.

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And that's not me being arrogant.

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That is, I will work until it happens.

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I never dared to dream big in the past because I thought that was, it didn't even

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enter my head that I would ever be able to be taken seriously by a corporate world.

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And now I am.

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So why wouldn't I ride that rollercoaster as far as I can possibly go.

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All right, everyone really quick.

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You heard Leah talk about how she has a VA now.

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Okay.

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Look, did you hear her talk about how she's scaling and

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she needs help you need help?

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Okay.

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If you're an entrepreneur and you don't have someone who's kind of

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that right hand or right arm to you, then you need to look at rocket

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station who sponsors this podcast.

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Okay.

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And you could go to the landing dock, rocket station.com, or you could

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emailBrooks@rocketstation.com and you need to check them out because that is

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what allows me to operate effectively and just as a killer every single day, because

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I'm not bogged down by all the nonsense.

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Okay.

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And I'm not saying that my assistant or obsolete Ellie has

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to deal with all the nonsense.

Speaker:

She's just way better at managing it and organizing it than I am.

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And it would make no sense considering some of the premium

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rates that we charge for some of the things that we do for them.

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To do some of these things on a daily basis.

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Just think there's 10 minute tasks, 15 minute tasks that you look at

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and you say to yourself, like, okay, I mean, it's only 10 minutes.

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Okay.

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Over the course of a week, an hour.

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And then if it's almost an hour, it's almost four hours a month.

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Let's get back to the show.

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So people, if you're listening and you've made it to this point, I think it's

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important that I kind of ask Leah how some of the things that she has discovered

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to be instinctual and intuitive.

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And I don't want to say easy, but, but just, it comes a little

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bit faster to her than others.

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How do you tell people who might be in a similar situation to you a year ago, where

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they're one foot in one foot out mentally?

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They're probably checked out.

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They know they have other talent.

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They want to start something.

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They're not necessarily risk averse, but they're like,

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how am I going to teach this?

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Or how can I educate people on this?

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It's.

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It's it's instinctual to me.

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I don't know how to formalize this because I'm pretty sure you weren't

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sure at the beginning either, but what would you say the first step for

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someone is who, who wants to lean in.

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Ask people around you.

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That's the biggest one is say to people, what do you see that I

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do that other people don't do?

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Because that's been the core for me and then listen to them because where

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it might feel uncomfortable when they say you're really, really good at this.

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Because if you're anything like me, that does feel very

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uncomfortable when people compliment.

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And I'm having to get more used to it now and just accept that, that it's not me

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being arrogant by saying I'm good at this.

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It's me being confident and assertive and saying, this is what I'm good at.

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And this is how I'm going to be so super successful and change my son's life.

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Listen to the people around you and ask them the questions.

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Like, what is it that you see me doing that other people don't do?

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What do you see are my strengths?

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What do you see are my weaknesses?

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Where can I improve that feedback is crucial in your own growth.

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And I would also say work really hard on getting that side hustle of what you

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want to a point where you are safe to.

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But leave bef just before you're really safe.

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Yeah.

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He was still running the transcription business up until February this year.

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And it wasn't really making me any profit.

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I had another transcriber who was basically doing it all and I wasn't

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making any profit, but when something went wrong, it was me that did it.

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And I was like, I'm not making enough money to be bothered with this.

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This is.

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And that was my plan, a all along LinkedIn with my plan B and then LinkedIn

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became my plan a, I kept my plan B the minute I dropped my plan B I flew, I

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went from earning, like I ended about 60, 50, 60 grand last year in the

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first, like the last half of the year, kind of made a hundred grand sense.

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If you've got to let go of the Deadwood for you to be able to really fly.

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Yeah,

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it's so hard to convey that.

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And I know what you're saying to be true, that once it has all of your

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focus, it's, it's just your mind never stops with what you can do, how you

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can improve, how you can serve better.

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Uh, the dreams get bigger.

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You start envisioning, like you're saying, speaking on stages across the

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world and bringing your son along with you and, and all these great things.

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The last thing I kind of wanted to cover.

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You know, here you are clearly on an ascent.

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Okay.

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Things are looking well and you are happy.

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What would you say to other people who are maybe on the come up to be like, dude?

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Watch out though.

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There's still plenty of obstacles and plenty of barriers.

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How do you keep yourself grounded?

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Um, too, even though once you, cause you know, once you taste

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that success it's addicting, right?

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It's like you could be on a golf course and you suck for 17 holes and you have one

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good hole and you're like, Aw, but anyway,

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My son, my son, my son keeps me grounded all the time.

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I posted on LinkedIn today.

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So a couple of days ago we were in the supermarket and he'd made

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a superhero potato from some TV show, super potato or something.

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It's a pepper pig thing, but.

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Potato into a superhero at school and brought it home with him and insisted

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on bringing it into the grocery store.

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And we're standing there in the grocery store with all these people around us and

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there's some power ranger toys, and he says, mommy, can I have a power ranger?

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I said, no, you've already got power Rangers.

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And he looked down his potato.

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He looked at all these other people.

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It's not fair.

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You only let me play with potatoes.

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And obviously I'm like, oh God, all these people just think I

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give my son vegetables to play.

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And those sorts of things keep me very much grounded.

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I'm still tidying up when my puppy rips a toy apart, I do all

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of, you know, I'm, I'm deeply.

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Deeply awkward with new people quite often, especially in person,

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I'm a lot more comfortable on zoom calls and out then than in-person.

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I started being approached by people in the street who recognize me, which I find

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very hard, very, I mean, they were always very polite, but it, for me, it's a very

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odd experience that it's, you know, it's not some, not that happens all the time,

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but it's happened about a dozen times now.

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It's like, oh my God.

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I don't find it hard to stay grounded.

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I think if I'm speaking to anybody who's on the come up, I would say,

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check your ego, stay in your lane with what you're giving advice on.

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There are some influences that you see out there that are very quick to give

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opinions on things that they have.

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Absolutely.

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No.

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Experience or expertise in, and you've got to be careful and, you

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know, they might argue that we've got to give everybody the respect that

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they can make their own minds up.

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But we live in a world where people eat laundry detergent and

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carry Petrel in plastic bags.

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So.

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I don't think sometimes when you've got a huge amount of influence that

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relying on people's intelligence is generally the best excuse.

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I think we have a certain amount of responsibility to not, not inflate

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situations or comments on things that could be dangerous, or, you know,

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in some way, damaging to people, I would say, check your ego and be

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careful of who you surround yourself.

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That's something that I am really facing at the moment.

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Everybody wants a piece and that's not me being arrogant.

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That is, I am from all angles.

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People want me to be on podcasts or to advertise their products or to be

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involved in their brand in some way.

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Or they want something from me all the time.

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Even if it's just free advice and there's no, self-awareness, they don't

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sort of think, well, actually she's probably had 200 of these messages today.

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Should I really be asking for more?

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She gives away all this stuff for free and I'm quite outspoken about it on LinkedIn

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to try and say, to have a bit of respect.

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Before you asking for something from people, give something

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first because that's how I do it.

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I think those are the biggest things, but just be careful who is around you.

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And when you find someone that you can trust, hold them close and invest

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your time and energy into them because that's a big one for me is that I've

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been people around me that I've gone.

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I can't trust you.

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And you're definitely not around before the right reason.

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You're off to something and be careful of the people that want to see you

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fail because that's going to happen.

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And that's a very unfortunate side of it, but there have been people around me that

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they're not happy that I'm succeeding and that's just a painful truth.

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Yeah, I forget where I heard or read it, but it was something along the lines of

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just the people who want to see you fail.

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Like it's not, it's not implicit, it's not over.

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Right.

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But I, I forget that.

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I think the analogy was like, just look around at who's

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clapping when you're rolling.

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And whoever's not clapping actually wants you to fail is like it's, it's,

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it's kind of like a subtle signal, but yeah, that, that's a hard,

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uh, detector to kind of pick up.

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Uh, but I, I do, I do know what you mean that, you know, it's also hard

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to miss, uh, once you recognize it and, and it's difficult, but, um,

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look, I, I want to make sure people know where they can find you for all

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things, LinkedIn and for branding and just, just really good fucking content.

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But, uh, tell, tell everyone where they can find you and where they should fall.

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Um, so they can follow me on Instagram at Leah does LinkedIn, which is Lea no H

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on the Leah, um, Leah Turner on LinkedIn.

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Obviously you'll probably find me with the rainbow Leah turner.co.uk.

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You can see all of the services and products that I offer, including my

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digital course, my content resources and the different trainings that I offer.

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But I am now fully booked until September.

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So that's what eight weeks away.

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I'm fully booked for the next eight, eight weeks.

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Yeah, which is always nice.

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You forgot to mention that you were in the e-commerce business, but your

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mug, I now have a limited edition Liam,

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because we have some problems with the delivery and I went, you know what, it's

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not worth it cause I'm not making much money on them, so I'm not going to bother.

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So they got, I'm going to buy a stock of them when I have a house.

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So I'll have them to give them.

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As

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I use it pretty regularly and it always minds me of what

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an awesome person you are.

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So thank you for being on the leadership blocker and thank you

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everyone who listened, please just make sure you go follow.

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I can tell you from personal experience.

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I actually think Leah's, she said she's openly naive, but she's

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also open about how much she could still learn from other people.

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Um, and I feel the same way, which why.

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I had zero hesitation when Leia offered me, uh, one of her products that just

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kind of helped me with a couple of things.

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And here I am someone who thinks I know everything about LinkedIn and some of

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those posts as a result of the prompts that she gave me fucking exploded.

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And I'm like, thank you, Leah.

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She just has a different mind, a creative mind, and just really,

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really knows what's going on and how to just help brand yourself.

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So check her out and Leah, thanks again.

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Thank you for inviting me.

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It's been an absolute pleasure.

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It's been good.

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Catching up.

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All right, everyone.

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Thank you so much.

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Go follow Leah right now.

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Go follow her on Instagram.

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Go follow her on LinkedIn.

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Learn from her.

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Enjoy her.

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She's just a down to earth human being.

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Who's has her heart set on number one.

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Elevating, uh, her and her family status to just enjoy life to the

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fullest and to go do what they want.

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But she also wants to make sure that you are able to amplify your inbound leads.

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She wants to speak to you.

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She wants to help your company not be boring.

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So go check her out and if you enjoyed it, please leave feedback.

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Please write a review, leave us some feedback for the podcast.

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Um, we are on a tear.

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I want to continue that.

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And one of the ways that is able to happen is through your selfless 60

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seconds of just saying this podcast is.

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Or I learned from this, or I'm sharing this with a friend

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because they need to hear this.

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They need to hear stories of a 35 year old who had a major career pivot.

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And at 36 is completely redefining everything about what she's

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been doing up until this point and crushing it by the way.

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Thanks for listening.

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Share it review it, rate it, and we will see you next week.