Rich Cardona Media

143. How to Use Rejection to Make Millions with Dariush Soudi

“People bye people before they buy their products or services.”Dariush Soudi

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On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with speaker and CEO Dariush Soudi about rejection, resilience and prosperity. Listen in as Rich and Dariush discuss reputation management, effective networking, and the difference between “hunters” and “farmers”.

Dariush Soudi is a well sought-after international speaker. His real, from-the-heart, true stories, take the listener through an emotional rollercoaster. With no formal education and no one to guide him, he has built several businesses worldwide. Born in a low-income family, he had to use his creativity and hard work to achieve growth in his business. He is the CEO of the Be Unique Group and the author of the upcoming book Monkey Business.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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Rocket Station

brooks@rocketstation.com

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00:09 – Introduction

03:27 – Dariush on storytelling

06:24 – Rejection, resilience and prosperity

14:28 – Living on your own terms

17:41 – Dealing with setbacks

19:56 – Reputation management

22:19 – Sales and rejection

27:10 – Knowing when to expand to different businesses

29:35 – “Hunters” and “farmers”

33:06 – Finding the right employees

34:53 – Confidence and sales

36:14 – Effective networking

39:31 – “The further you can see, the more you can imagine.”

43:07 – Rich’s closing remarks

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Here is how to connect with Dariush:

YouTube

Instagram

LinkedIn

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Transcript
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Welcome back to the leadership locker.

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I am your host Rich Cardona, and you are in the right place.

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If you are a new entrepreneur, an aspiring entrepreneur or an

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experienced entrepreneur who knows that the learning never stops.

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Uh, the purpose of the leadership lockers to have industry

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experts and influencers on here.

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I'm talking, Andy Frisella is I'm talking to Patrick bet.

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David Gary V Kendra hall.

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People who have a lot to give you.

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Okay.

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And on the days people aren't on the days, I don't have guests I'm on here talking

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about some of the things I'm encountering during the journey, document the journey.

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Right.

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So that's what we do.

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Well, today's guest is Derek . I found him on the dropping bombs podcast with

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Brad Lee and I was just mesmerized by his ability to tell stories.

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Clearly, I did not want him to revisit any of those stories while we had our podcast

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together, but I did reach out to him and I just was in touch with his wife, Angela,

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who was such a pleasure, uh, coordinating with, and then I got him on and we did.

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So, what is he going to talk about now?

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The title of the podcast is talking about how rejection has made him millions,

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but what, what do we do with rejection?

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Like what does that mean?

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What does it do to our mindset?

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What does it do to the way we position ourselves?

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What does it do to the way we sell?

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What does it do to the way we approach relationships rejection?

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It's so hard to swallow, but dare you.

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She's one of those people who sees the opportunity in it, he sees

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the opportunity to serve others.

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He sees the opportunity for self-improvement.

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He sees the opportunity to make his dreams come true.

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And to start another company and to employ more people, he is fascinating

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in his takes and his stories.

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And I really hope that you enjoy what he's got to say.

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If there's anything you take away from this, you're just

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going to see what a humble man.

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Sounds and it looks like, and we're going to get right into it.

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Here we go.

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All right, everyone.

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You already heard that TRO.

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Uh, so I'm here with Mr.

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Derry Sudi and it's evening for him and it's morning for me, but

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we are making this happen and I'm thrilled to have him on and there,

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you shall need to tell you this.

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I met you on Instagram because I DMD you because you were on Bradley's podcast.

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And I had them on.

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These clips like blew me the fuck away.

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I was all I could write was O M F G.

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And I don't even write weird stuff like that, but your

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storytelling abilities attracted me because I could feel the truth.

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I could feel the vulnerability and just the delivery.

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And I was like, I have to get them on the show.

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So thank you for coming on.

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I'm really, really excited to talk about business and life.

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Well, thank you so much for being in touch now.

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I've had honestly, probably, yeah.

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Six or 700 invitations by DM.

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And you would have first.

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So congratulations for being the first one.

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And then I really loved, uh, loved your principles.

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I loved your values.

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And I thought, you know, I don't give a damn how many followers you

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have or how many, I don't even know.

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I just, I've got to be ready for this guy.

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And here I am, and it's my honor to be on your podcast.

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Now, just as a point of reference last I checked.

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I had the highest viewings on any of Bradley's views.

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I had 16,000 views on one of my, I was like, so proud, so, so

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proud.

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I'm not surprised there was something about the manner

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in which you delivered it.

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And I actually mentioned when I was coordinating with your wife, Angela

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for the podcast, I was like, I might ask about storytelling, but let me

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ask you this straight off the bat.

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And, and again, like I taught, I told you it wasn't.

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These are just stories or did you, do you practice how to tell stories?

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Because the way is just, this is

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different.

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I think it's, I don't practice anything.

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It's just natural and it's, I've been unlucky, I think in other ways,

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blessed now where my bad luck came is I lost my father when I was three.

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I lost my grandfather who took care of me at seven, or my mum was 23 when she was.

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She had to fight my father's family for my, for my, um, you know, who

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looked after me and my sister.

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So all I saw was fighting and wars and deaths and the such a young age.

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And I train myself to forget about negativity.

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So I could have an argument with someone today and tomorrow.

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I swear, I'll be looking at me.

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Did we have, did we have a conflict somewhere along the way?

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Because my wounds been trained to just forget about bad things in the past.

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So I always associated that my story in my head to memorize it because I've

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probably forgotten 90% of the things I I write about or talk about, but the

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stories made it easy for me to remember.

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You know, and I'm dyslexic also.

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I'm not one for, I'm not definitely.

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If you ever get a text message from your email, you know that I'm, I'm very good

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at Mandarin, but you'd be like, this is not English, but, um, so storytelling

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just came natural to me, uh, is the way of remembering things and people have come

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and I'll tell you how I going to speaking.

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It was just an absolute coincidence.

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If I may share it.

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Please please seven and a half years ago, somebody heard about my story

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in Dubai and said, Hey, listen, I did some coaching with them.

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And at that time I was doing personal coaching and he said to

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me, look, I really love your story.

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I'm doing an event in Dubai, in a place called knowledge village, and

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it's a Friday and a Saturday, Friday, and Saturday is our weekends in Dubai.

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We don't, we work on Sundays.

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So I've got a slot for you.

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Five o'clock on Sunday.

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Great.

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I've never spoken before.

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You know, I think of a challenge and I didn't realize it's like a grave man slot

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it's the last slot of a two day event, you know, and everybody wants to go home.

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I think it was three o'clock actually.

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So I prepared a couple of sheets that I was so nervous when I was holding the

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sheets for shaking like this in front of it's about a hundred people there.

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And I started talking.

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And I was given like an hour, what was that?

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Two and a half hours.

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And people were dancing, dancing, they were crying.

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They were jumping up and down and somebody opened up a Facebook page for me.

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And today I have a 350,000 followers on Facebook and people came to me said,

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right, you're a great storyteller.

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You make me cry, you inspired me.

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And I thought, you know, this is really good.

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And after that, you feel amazing because you're getting some

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positive feedback and just, maybe I've got some, something to share.

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This is like music to a lot of people's ears.

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And I also want to set expectations like after you listen to him,

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you'll realize why that happens.

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I don't just think it's that easy, but what did you talk

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about when you went up there?

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How the hell did you stretch it out that long?

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I'm writing a book called monkey business.

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Okay.

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When I've been to many seminars and thank God to my first wife and she

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introduced me to personal growth because otherwise I was just a very good salesman.

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I can talk about that as well, but realized whenever I went

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to the course, I wasn't there.

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Most attractive.

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I wasn't the strongest.

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I wasn't the most disciplined.

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I wasn't the prettiest.

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I wasn't anything special.

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You know, there was some people who had like the ACEs and the

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cogs in the pack when have a ball.

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And I, I was, I was thinking there must be lots of people like me who don't have a

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particular gift, but they have to desire.

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Okay.

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So I started learning what my, within my capabilities or skills,

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um, how to actually process.

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You know how to prosper in life.

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And, and when you do that and you learning your own way, you put

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your head on that guilting block.

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A number of times, you know, if I worked, if I worked in a bank, my days will

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not be as exciting as an entrepreneur.

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You know, I can share with you a hundred thousand different ways.

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I've been rejected.

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I can share with you 500 different ways of interviewed people.

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Who've let me down.

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I can share with you how many times people have asked me for money.

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I lent and I lost them as friends and never got my money.

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And the stupidity is to make the same mistake.

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And often I've done that because again, my mentality is, forget the past, right?

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So I tend to document things and make sure I remember when somebody asks for money,

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how to say no, without upsetting them.

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Very honest.

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So everything I share and I'm going to share with you today with my

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pleasure is just my own expense.

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So I heard about the monkey business being in the process.

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And I, I really resonate with that because in my military career, I always felt like

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I was the guy who had to study way longer.

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I was a guy who had to stay away later.

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I was the guy who probably shouldn't be out partying with the rest of the

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guys because I was behind in my head.

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I'm like, I'm fucked.

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Like this is awful IO.

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I felt like that in school, I felt like that in the Marine Corps,

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sometimes I felt like that at Amazon.

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And now I'm kind of at a place where I accepted so much.

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And like you said, you put your head on the guilty unblock.

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It just becomes muscle memory.

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Like your ability.

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Unfortunately, you know, as a young child to begin to have a short

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memory, seems like it's benefited you.

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It seems like it's something a lot of entrepreneurs should match.

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It has

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an FIS childhood.

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It was like, so what, it can't be worse than what I've been through, you know?

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So I take that risk.

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So what I moved countries is just pack a case and book your flight.

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So what somebody says no, to me, it became the fear wasn't so big anymore

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because I had so much pain at the base.

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It's so funny as you were telling me about the, all the times you've been rejected,

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I immediately am thinking of one of the X-Men movies where the juggernaut is

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just like running through these walls.

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He's just like, doesn't care.

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It doesn't care.

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It doesn't care.

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It doesn't seem like you have a chip on your shoulder.

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Some people use that chip on your shoulder from being

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ignored or rejected or whatever.

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As a motivator, Tom Brady is a perfect example, right?

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Like a draft pick way, way late.

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There's other people who like Coby, for example, who are just like, I

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don't think anyone ever doubted him.

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I think he's just like, it's just what I want.

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How would you talk to people about having a different mentality than a

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chip on your shoulder versus I want one.

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I hate being rejected.

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I hate coming second.

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You know, and one thing I do know that whatever's got me going just hard

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work, hard work, hard work, hard work.

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No matter how many times I got rejected.

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I I'll tell you a little bit about my mom.

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Okay.

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My mom was brought up.

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Because she, she became a widow at 23 and everything was bad.

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Everything was going to end up bad.

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You gotta be careful with this and be careful well with that.

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And this is in Iran, in Iran.

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Yes.

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She used to abused me physically and mentally.

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Okay.

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And she used to put my head in the toilet and flush it and say, you worse than shit.

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She used to put pins in my fingers.

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I'll put this, put me in the car with her, beat herself up and said,

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I'm doing this to me because of you.

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And all I could remember thinking.

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I just want to be 18 and get out and I just want to be 18 and

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get out and have my own life.

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But somewhere along the way, I always thought, cause I lost my father three.

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I always thought there was something in his DNA.

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Something in his DNA that kept me going that it was, he was his inspiration.

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He was an entrepreneur.

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And constantly, I was thinking he was my inspiration.

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But having said that five years ago, I was in a seminar where with Tony Robbins,

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Tony Robbins instructor in, in tenor reef.

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And I was listening to Tony and I just got it.

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I thought, hang on a second.

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It's always been my mum.

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Who's been my inspiration.

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Not my father.

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It was my mom telling me I couldn't do it.

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I just want the insight, show her that.

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So instead of avoiding her for 50 years, I picked up the phone and I said, mom,

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what are you doing this Christmas?

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I invited her around.

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And every time she said something opposite to what I was thinking, which is I found

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pessimistic, suffocating, draining.

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I thought, thank you.

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Thank you for the inspiration.

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Thank you for inspiring me because it was because of you

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rejecting me every single day.

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I became whatever I am.

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I'm not saying I'm only a big deal, but I became successful.

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I became comfortable.

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I

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love to have podcasts because it's just a conversation for me.

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And I'm never worried about offending anyone.

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And I know, I know when we're having a good conversation and this is a good

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conversation, but let me say this, what you just said to me that will power

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in, in, in being the bigger person.

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So to speak is like a cell phone.

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Willpower is finite.

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I just listening to you.

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I feel like it'd be exhausting trying to, to really reframe how are you?

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Do you know,

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I really, it's still a source thing.

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I could be in her presence.

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And by the way, I've never ever shared that with anyone.

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I've never shared it because my mom's thank God she's still alive.

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And you know, other ones, this thing that I've repeated this in public.

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So it's draining is every day is exhausting.

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Now what really, because I used to go through, when you have people who

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have those of highs, they have lows of lows, higher highs, the lower,

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the lows that won't happen to me was when I was 43, had a heart attack

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and I felt it was so premature.

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I felt it wasn't my time.

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I felt I had so much music within me that this is not my time.

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And since then, I can honestly tell you.

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Every day, every breath is a bonus because I saw them operate in my heart.

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When I was awake, they put the stents in my heart that was showing my heart.

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I was like, God, I'm not Superman anymore.

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You know, I want me to just flesh and blood and, and it was

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incredible, incredible experience.

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And, you know, just to give you a funny story, they shaved my head.

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When I had, they put me on morphine, which was floating on

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the bed and they shaved my bowls.

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So I'm like, what the hell?

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I've had a Hawk today.

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Thanks guys.

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Honestly, as soon as we'd stand to put the, this is the archery

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that goes straight to the heart.

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So I was like, oh my God, I'm dying.

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Anyway, just shave them.

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So there was just messing about why have you shaved his

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bullets, but we could use it.

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That was on morphine going, this was embarrassing.

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So, but the speed, they put this, this old cable up your wrist into

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your arm and into your heart.

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And you're thinking, oh my God, it's so simple.

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You know, getting into your heart.

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It's just so simple.

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And we are all flesh and blood and it will all come to an end and we

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see the majority of people walk around, like they're going to be

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alive forever, and it's just not good.

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I

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want to switch a little bit into business then thank you for that.

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I don't think anyone's ever talked about getting their ball shaved on my podcast.

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So another first or we're going in the right direction.

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You said something on a podcast that was unbelievable to me.

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And it might seem so simple and trivial to you, but you talk about.

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Sometimes how you don't necessarily network enough yet here, you

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already have social media.

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You're giving speeches that make people cry.

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You're starting multiple businesses and succeeding and multiple businesses.

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You're clear, charismatic and animated, but you said there's times

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where you have client meetings where you will cancel the day before.

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And I'm here to tell you I've done the same thing.

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I don't know what it is that comes over me.

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Interacting on your own terms, feel so much better than when you have

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to, but I want to dig into that.

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Like I resonate with that, but what is that all

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about?

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I'll give you, I'll give you an example.

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Um, about six or seven years ago, again?

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No, maybe about nine years ago when I just came to Dubai.

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There was a client of mine who was a water purification company.

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They haven't paid this.

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I hadn't paid this stuff for six months and they're hiring

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me to turn the company around.

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And those days you could do that, you know, they didn't have much

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labor rights and stuff like that.

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So it's almost like slavery.

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It was.

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So they called me in to turn the company around and they said, whatever you do,

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when you come to the office, don't go to the warehouse because they'll kill you.

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They haven't been, they haven't been fed angry.

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And I think if you're part of the management, they're going to kill you,

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just go the other way to the office.

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So I started sending company around, try and hire salespeople.

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And then one day I was at a traffic lights one evening, and I noticed the,

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a rolls Royce convertible partnership.

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Tara was the onus sun company, almost sun in a rolls Royce convertible.

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So I followed him to his house, got dinner, where they lived and

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had about four or five Supercars outside and he repulsed me.

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It repulsed me.

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And next day I was going to the offices.

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Yeah.

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I didn't.

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I was in a car park and I didn't want to go in.

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I hated them.

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I hate to them.

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I think everybody has a coach and I phoned, my coach has said,

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listen, I want to return the money.

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And I don't want to, diss guys are not honorable people that

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have really shitty values.

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And he said, look, Doris, who's your customer, these guys who are

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paying you, or this are the people who haven't been paid six months.

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And I thought, oh, wow.

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Wow.

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Okay.

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I turned the company around, they all got paid and I left and

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I never spoke to the guy again.

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That time I was poor and I need the money now.

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Thank you, God.

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I can pick and choose.

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I can pick and choose, you know, when rent needs to be paid,

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school fees needs to be paid.

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Sometimes you take you out the ass, you know, just that's the way it is.

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But if you're in a privileged position that you can pick and

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choose some, you know, who you work with, but it takes time.

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It takes time.

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And, you know, honestly, I'm about 3% of where I want to be.

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I see people very successful people and they might walk straight past me.

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Do you know what I think one day you'll be chasing.

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One day you becoming to me and I'm not going to kiss your ass because

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you're rich, you're successful.

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I have values that I'm very proud of and one that you come

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after me and they do, they do.

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Yeah, it's incredible.

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But you just have to too many people watch.

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America's got tired and we watched a little people winning, winning the

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have the patience, it just takes time.

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Well, I once interviewed the president of a publishing company and he talked to

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me about how he lost a million dollars.

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You've lost 50 times that, uh, and there's anecdotes that stories that you have, uh,

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where you were down to virtually nothing.

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And, and you were just putting yourself out there trying to make

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ends meet, and you've been able to research, uh, and then multiple ways.

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And you said the higher, the highs, the lower, the lows,

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and that is unbelievably true.

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But in those moments, how are you able to withstand maybe all the mixed

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emotions, the guilt, the fear, you know, just the shitty clients, all of it.

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How do you collect yourself to be able to deliver?

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Do

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you know?

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I was never going to be defeated.

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I was never going to be defeat I somewhere along the way, I made a

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decision that this life was gonna be.

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I'm not going to be another fucker.

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Who's going to be born and dying.

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Nobody will remember.

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So whenever even now, today I'm in an appointment.

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Do you know what?

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I always think my children are my judges.

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So when this, I pretend they're sitting in a meeting looking at me and I'm

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thinking, if they're looking at me now, holding this meeting with this guy,

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would they be saying I'm proud of my dad?

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Or would it be.

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If they embarrass us, shouldn't be behaving the way I have done.

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If they say I'm proud of my dad, I've done a good job.

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And at that time, at that time, not that I didn't, I had nothing, the people, it was

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on the podcast or not the people who were putting house arrest for attacking me.

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They actually started building websites against me.

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So I was meeting people.

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We had no money and these guys were saying, daddy, she said,

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Peter follow he's got seven wives.

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And even my children were obsessed by it.

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You know, they were like, oh daddy, there's another website.

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It was, I cannot tell you how hard it was.

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I agree with someone agreed to start tomorrow, the phone up in the

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afternoon and cancel, you know, and, and they wouldn't give me the reason.

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And then it was these websites and it was just very, very difficult,

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but I was never going to get there.

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Ever.

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I just knew it was just a matter of time.

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Yeah.

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People support me.

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Um, my partner left me, called me a loser, you know, and I

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just said, just wait, just wait.

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And here, here's the thing.

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When those people come back into your life and you think, oh, you've done good again.

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I step up again and again and again and again and again, never, ever stop.

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Now

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you did mention that story.

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And you talked about how reputation management is actually one of your

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most lucrative pieces of your business.

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I'm in personal branding.

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I mean, my media company revolves around personal branding, which in

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another way you could put it as is your reputation, but how do people

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enlist your help in that regard and how, I mean, I could imagine why it's

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lucrative, but can you dig deeper into it?

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Sure actually it's word of mouth now.

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I don't even advertise it anymore.

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It's a long, long process because it depends if the bad news, first of all, we

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don't work with anybody with bad values.

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We check them out to make sure they're good people.

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They've just been hard done too.

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Right.

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So, um, again, that's really, really important that we protect the right.

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I got so far that I got into the human rights courts within Europe to

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make sure we actually fought Google.

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And we won that you have there as a human being.

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You have the rights to make sure your history disappear.

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And Google photos.

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So we can go as far as it got to the stage where I was calling people in Bermuda

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who had a server, and I'll say here's a court paper, these are lies about me.

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Please take my website down.

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I say, screw you it's worldwide.

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Bev is a free speech.

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I said, this is, this is so unfair.

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So once you go to the human rights courts around the world, and then,

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and then they can uphold it, then you think I've done something.

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And I contacted my minister of parliament.

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He said, he's been, I found people all over the world being stoked.

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I didn't have a clue because of the political beliefs.

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So whatever, you know, you type it, bill gates, God knows how much

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bad things are said about him, about the virus and the vaccine.

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So these people can stop trading.

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They, these people can stop blooming because somebody put a dislike to them.

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However things have changed slightly because 10 years ago,

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when you saw something, a website, do you tend to believe it?

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But now people make 30 checkpoints before they make the decision.

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So the consumer is a lot smarter.

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And then before they ask

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you the good things, because there's so much bullshit.

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Exactly in fact.

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So the consumer's a lot smarter and I don't see reputation

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management to be much longer my most profitable side of the business.

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But then, because, because you know, when you look@thebooking.com

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or you want to book your hotel, you're going to travel advisor,

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booking.com and all sorts of things.

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You make your own decision about your travels.

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Now this is just believe in award of one weapon.

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We're talking about consumers.

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This is perfect segue as someone who sat here 10 or 15 minutes ago and

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told me you've been rejected thousands of times when it comes to or buyers.

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And you, you said, uh, somewhere buyers are liars.

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And then I love that, you know, whether it's prospects, clients, whoever it is

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with the rejections and the objections.

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There's obviously an element of having to build the thick

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skin, but it seems like you have mastered trying to get ahead of it.

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How do you do that?

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To put yourself in a position of confidence in sales versus, you

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know, weakness or, oh, I don't want to be another sales guy, you

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know, I don't want to be salesy.

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I don't want to pitch, how do you get ahead of it?

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Sure.

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The first thing is that this is, this is like the most number one

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thing is that sales is a number.

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Period, no matter how good you are.

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You're always going to get more rejections than yeses period.

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Now, if I knock on a hundred doors and two people buy from me, and if I go to Doris's

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this course and learn his buyers, Elias, methodology, whatever four people are

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going to buy still 96, people are going to say no, but you've doubled your sales.

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So an optimist will look at it, go, whoa.

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I learned so much I've doubled my sales, uh, pessimists was so that

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shouldn't have been worked cause 96 people still rejecting me.

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So sales is a numbers game.

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Sales is just a numbers game and secondly is unless I could never be a model,

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not the fact that I don't look good.

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It's just that I couldn't take the personal rejection.

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Okay.

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It's hard for me.

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But when you send a product to service, it's never personal.

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Yes, that is never personal.

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You can fix your skills, but they don't like the gadget you're selling.

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That's the way it is.

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You know, it's amazing how many people DM me since the Bradley podcast

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saying, once guy said I've got a.

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Fabricating fabricating company for building sites.

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I said, okay, tell me three USBs of your unique selling

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propositions of your product.

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And he said, blah-blah-blah, it was priced, which is rubbish.

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And then he said, one of them was 10 year warranty.

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So I said, do your contractors care about warranty?

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He goes, not really.

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So I said, why are you saying you it's your unique selling proposition?

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And it didn't have a name.

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So you're going to the market and you don't know what your

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consumers want your customers want.

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What are you doing?

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You know, if I go and get rejected, us, sits in the car and I'll

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think how could have polished that one a little bit better.

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Even after 35 years of selling, I get rejected on the phone.

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I'll put it, I reevaluate the call, you know, I, my ego doesn't

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blind me to think that I'm right.

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And they're the idiots.

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Right.

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But first thing is, how can I improve?

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I feel like this is something I've noticed and maybe I've done it as

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well, where we fall in love with the amount of effort that we've

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put into a service or a product.

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And we think like this shit is great blind.

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You know, the best ideas have formed in the shower or in the

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bath would be great in the bath.

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Right.

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But nobody's interested.

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So in my, my humble opinion is don't ask your friends and family what they

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think of your great idea, because they've always going to tell you what

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you want to hear, go to the marketplace.

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It's amazing how many people cannot be bothered, making 15 telephone

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calls, seeing 20 people to see.

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Before I remortgaged my house and put all my family's savings into this.

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Can I just ask 20 people if they're interested and if not, why they

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don't bother you just don't bother.

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Hey everyone, quick break to remind you that a virtual assistant is

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probably one of the key first hires that you need to make.

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Whether it's part-time, whether it's full time, you are looking to offer.

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So much of the stupid shit that you do on any given day that you know, is

Speaker:

not directly driving you towards your goals, whether it's administrative,

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whether it's operational, whether it's tactical, a virtual assistant

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can change the game for you.

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And that's exactly what happened to me, which is exactly why I wanted to

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tell you that rocket station is where I found her rocket stations, where I

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found Ellie, my ridiculous superstar VA.

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And if you want to look into rocket station, I highly suggest you do.

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You can email them@brooksatrocketstationdotcomoryoucouldgotolandingdockdiscoveryatrocketstation.com.

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And look, you have to tell them that you heard me.

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You have to tell them that, and you can get $500 off your process development.

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And what does that mean?

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It means that before you even have a VA, you have.

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Things that you were needing to take off your plate, documented and processed out.

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So that way the VA could jump right in.

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You're not going to get that on Upwork.

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You're not going to get that on Fiverr Craigslist.

Speaker:

I mean, whatever you want to use, just stop looking at rocket station.

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Let's get back to the show.

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Let me ask about multiple businesses because when I see someone like, thank

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you, and I'm like, I think you have nine companies or something along those lines.

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I'm just as, as a young entrepreneur and by young, I mean, you know, first

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business, you know, haven't cracked a million yet, that kind of thing.

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And you see someone with multiple companies.

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People probably think I aspire to have multiple companies.

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I want passive income or I want multiple revenue streams

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and all these other things.

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And ed, my lead is very notorious for saying, get to the thing

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that makes you a million first.

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And then, and then you can, you can look into other things, but how do

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you evaluate when it's time for you, someone like you to be like it's

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time for something else as well.

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I'm going to extend my reach into a different industry.

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How do you even think about that and conceptualize it?

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Mine started with fear because what happened was I was in a

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health and beauty industry.

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And when I lost that, I lost everything.

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And I thought when I came out of the stress of heart attack

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and losing everything, I thought, how can I prevent that?

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And for me to prevent that is to have multiple businesses.

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So just two things, one fails.

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I can fall into the other one that you would meet.

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So it wasn't like a choice.

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It just automatically did that.

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One of the things I advise my clients not to do is to the shiny penny, this shine,

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when you're on, when you're entrepreneurs, the shiny pennies everywhere,

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you see opportunity everywhere.

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So I have a book that I write all my shiny penny ideas on, and I

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look at it over and make it to.

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And then I think to myself, you know what, that's a good idea and I'm

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following through, but sometimes I'll look at it, go, what was I thinking?

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Right.

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What was I thinking?

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And I'll just put that away.

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So the way I see things is that as it's the lowest hanging fruit.

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Whatever it costs you the least amount of money and time, and it

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has the most rewards for it again.

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And you can see yourself doing this for six months a year down the line.

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It's the opportunity to take lots of people.

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Copy us.

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I've had eight people copy our agency.

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Three months later, they bought and they moved.

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They hurt us for about three months.

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It takes some stupid clients away.

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We send them in no hard feelings that the client comes back, you

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know, tell between the legs and embarrassed, but that's the way they,

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you know, the cookie crumbles, right?

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It's just in time, you know, what's going to happen.

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Now, if somebody leaves you and they have the same passion as you

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have that there could be serious competition, but often people leave

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for the money and not for the passion.

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And you never last because if you're passionate about what you're

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doing, as you constantly reinventing yourself and growing and changing.

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You're multiple industries, multiple businesses to the outside person.

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It could look like, what is his focus?

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People like the way.

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Yeah.

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I look at it as, uh, from a creative aspect, like having a media company is

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like, okay, like I want to be able to nail something like video content or

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podcasting, but maybe I shouldn't do SEO and maybe I shouldn't do Facebook

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ads and all these other things.

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Where's my focus.

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How is that able to happen?

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How are you able to, to really deliver on all of those?

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I'm actually really, really blessed because for some reason, my son was a

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great follower of me since the age of 10.

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Really?

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He followed every note.

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When you live your life through your son, the poor thing, he was a captain

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of his football team, rugby team.

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You name it.

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He was a captain of top athletes.

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Everything I couldn't be, I made sure he was.

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And since I was 13, he used to work for me.

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So, but the difference is that he's a farmer and I'm a hunter.

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He was cold calling for me when he was 16 in Dubai.

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And I was seeing people on his appointments that he was making over the

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phone with me, the really unbelievable.

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Now his character is like his mum, my first wife, that she's a farmer.

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She likes to see the same people.

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Look after them improve things.

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If I do a deal, I don't want to see the guy again.

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So I call myself a hunter, right.

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Unless there's a problem.

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I got to fix it.

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So I hunt.

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So that's what perfectly, he's got attention to detail where I have no

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idea on the bigger picture thinker.

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I'm a visionary, uh, I have standards that I want the farmer to achieve.

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So I'm constantly pushing him, but he sees the same people over and over again.

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I'm very blessed to have, uh, a team member who we constantly clashing

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by the way, constantly clashing.

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He should have been my dad.

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I should have been his son.

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Yeah.

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Well, let me ask this really quick.

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Sorry to interrupt.

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Like if you're the hunter and you know, you're the hunter.

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Well,

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I tell the client that I tell the client, so you never see me

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again, unless there's a problem.

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I'm in the WhatsApp group, I'm watching everything, but you're

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never going to talk unless this see an issue, I'll jump in and help.

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But I'm a hunter.

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You're not going to see me again, but you have the perfect

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farmer and the team will look.

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Yeah.

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Got it.

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Uh, cause I I'll, I was just going to ask like, don't you want to see it

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through, but it seems like you're able to not only build businesses, but build

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fantastic teams of farmers, so to speak,

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it's ongoing.

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My biggest challenge is manpower.

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It really is.

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I cannot believe the shit standards that universities.

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I cannot believe these graduates coming up with marketing to

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have never done any marketing.

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I don't understand how they can call themselves marketing experts.

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And it's really embarrassing.

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They don't teach emotional intelligence.

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They don't teach initiative.

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It's incredible.

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The passive con generalized once in a while, I get really good ones, but

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you know, it's, it's quite sad to see.

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And I call all my followers gladiators because I think as generations we've gone.

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They don't so soft.

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They get one, one resistance.

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They jumped ship because when you and I, when I was younger, I

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used to think about having two, three jobs, their lifetime, right.

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But now they're thinking about at least 25 to 30 jobs, a lifetime.

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So jumping ship is no big deal.

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And how can you invest in training people?

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When the first hurdle hurdle they get, they jumped.

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So when I integrate now, I have a seven to eight step interview

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process and I'm put them through.

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I'm putting you through hell to see if they've got the balls to stay.

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And if they do the rest is a holiday.

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I'm not sure if you're familiar with Andy Frisella uh, the real AF no.

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Okay.

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Well, he's got this podcast called real AAF and he's got

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a very big multiple companies.

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And he says that when he used to do the interviewing, um,

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he would make it as difficult.

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As humanly possible, he would, he would literally try to make them quit

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the interview, not by being a Dick or anything like that by, by saying,

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you're going to work ridiculously hard.

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I don't care how qualified you are.

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You're going to start in the warehouse.

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You're gonna start in customer service.

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And through that, he's able to just get the right fit and, and the people I've

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talked to have entered the company.

Speaker:

Really see how that trajectory is able to happen and why it's by design.

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But that's very interesting that you say that and I'm going to have to

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make sure that that's something I emulate as, as higher start to have.

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Do you know what the problem is?

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You can explain it through a story.

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It's like, um, hairdresser, not, I know many hairdressers, but, um,

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some of these pastors, they right.

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Follow this hairdresser and serve these customers T for six months.

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Okay.

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And you wash their hair like this, the moment you give them a proper hair to do,

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they're going to absolutely shoot them.

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Okay.

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And it's the same in our company.

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Look, follow this guy and don't do anything.

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Don't talk to customers six months down the line, three months salary.

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We're going to put you under some pressure.

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You know what he's going to think.

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What the fuck you've been paying me for three months to six months doing this.

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Now you want the same more work for the same amounts of money and mean jump.

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So what I say is work them hard, work them so hard, teach through repetition.

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Repetition is the everything.

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And, you know, we send them, we send them to the market, good place.

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We've done no training or repetition.

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And we wonder why they demolish Christ or the, you know, why they

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fail so much because we didn't invest the time in our people.

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And then we wonder why they leave.

Speaker:

And then once that's easier, that's easier.

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I'm a huge believer in mastering the monotony.

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And I really resonate with monkey business.

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I can't wait to get it once it's out, because I feel like I'm that guy.

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I like the best thing for me is repetition, repetition, repetition.

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And then I feel kind of unstoppable at some point.

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There's an inflection point where the learning is easier

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and I could go past anybody.

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I don't feel threatened by anyone or anything.

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And I'm just on a,

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and what happens then?

Speaker:

Your confidence comes in right?

Speaker:

And then, and then the person in front of you feels the conflict.

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Before, is it feel the desperation, right?

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Because you're not coherence when your confidence, if it isn't

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the same wavelength, the client feels it and they buy from you.

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You never have to sell anything because you oozing with confidence.

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You know, you're going to fix their marketing.

Speaker:

You know, you've got to bring them results.

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You know, you've got to bring them profits.

Speaker:

So they're just buying into you.

Speaker:

And that's the first rule of sales people.

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No matter if the Zuma, what people buy people before they buy their products.

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People buy people who they like and trust and are like themselves.

Speaker:

So we asked to be comedians, you know, we have to be chameleons as well.

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When we are selling, we got to act like them, get they get it right.

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Feelings and vibes.

Speaker:

So you've, area's got to be constantly on paying attention to the other person.

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Yes.

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It's so funny.

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You mentioned that.

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I know you're just like.

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I'm not able to focus very well.

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And I'm 40.

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Before March of this year, I read probably five books cover to cover ever.

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And I mean, they were not groundbreaking books by any means.

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Like they were probably simple.

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And then this year, since then, uh, I've read, uh, I think I'm up to 11 books.

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I'm reading never split the difference right now with Chris Voss.

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And it's exactly that like the active listening piece is something I have faced.

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At many, many, many times, because I was so I thought I was being

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confident, trying to tell them how great my service would be.

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It was actually, the last thing I should be doing is shutting my fucking mouth.

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Exactly.

Speaker:

Nobody's interested in your business.

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Nobody's interested in my business.

Speaker:

All they want to talk about.

Speaker:

Somebody just phoned me about at half an hour before our podcast.

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I said, look, I want you to run my networking event.

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It's a hundred people coming and I want you to run my networking event.

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Now, would you speak for 15 minutes?

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I said no, if I'm going to do a networking event, I'll speak for the whole two hours.

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He goes, what'd you want me to do for 15 minutes?

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Cause we'll teach them the networking.

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And then I'll do my normal networking after an hour and 45 minutes.

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I said, can you tell me about your normal network?

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He goes, you have five people will stand up and talk about this business.

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I said, okay, so you got another 95 people watching these five

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people talk about their businesses.

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What's going, if you know the internal dialogue, what's going through their mind,

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because what, some of them are bored.

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Some of my, it, some who want to leave and somebody want to buy from them.

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I said, so when you like to have a networking event, when everybody wants

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to buy from that person, yes, of course.

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I said, well, let me run the whole two hours.

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I am of the belief now and will, and we we'll have to wrap here

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soon out of respect for your time and mind, but I don't believe

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elevator pitches are real anymore.

Speaker:

I don't know anyone who's got hired in an elevator.

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And I think if you are pre-pro I don't like meeting someone

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when I go, what do you do?

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And I hate asking that question to begin with and they spit it off and

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I'm like that rehearsed bullshit.

Speaker:

Like, I don't need to know any of that.

Speaker:

The moment they say, I'm an accountant.

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You think, oh God, get me out of the word lawyer.

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You think?

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Oh my God.

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Okay.

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This is what I would say.

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When you, when you're networking, you need to inspire people.

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Okay.

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I was so tight of money.

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Like I was shy.

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If you go into YouTube, you see one of my networking presentations

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called the three apples.

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I think you'll enjoy it.

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Okay.

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Everybody loves.

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And I only had 30 seconds to inspire people in the room to buy from me.

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Okay.

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And I use the all three senses.

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I use the sound, the smell, the noise, everything, the feel of things.

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And I did a 32nd presentation and I sold to 20 people in the room.

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Then I thought, what is, what is my elevator pitch?

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Okay.

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So when people used to do, what do you do?

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I said, I sell aspirin.

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I said, aspirin.

Speaker:

So what do you mean?

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I said, well, I find the headache of your business.

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And I think.

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Oh, yeah.

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When can I come and find out what your headache is?

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Ridiculous.

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I didn't tell him what I did.

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Who are my legal profession accounts, nothing.

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I'll just inspire them.

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I think that's a bit cheeky.

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I could have this guy in my office for half a day.

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Right because he'd be quite entertaining and I'll just go a memorable.

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So people on creative when they come to their presentations, when it comes to

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network and he go, how many accountants?

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I mean training for 15 years, would you like a knife to cut your wrist?

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Let me ask you this last question.

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When you mentioned you were a hunter.

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You mentioned, you are very much attached to being a visionary and your vision.

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And you mentioned in a podcast about how in Dubai, you could see

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out and out and out further, you could see the more you can imagine.

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Talk to me about that and how important that is for young entrepreneurs,

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you know, through trends all the time.

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When you again, meet pessimistic people, I'll give you.

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I'll give you an example.

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I used to have the fastest growing mobile phone in the company in the UK.

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And I noticed there was loads of mobile and phone companies

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who had shops and stores.

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And I thought, hang on, this is really expensive.

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What about me going mail-order okay.

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And at one stage it was selling like four or 5,000 phones a week, a month.

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And then.

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Okay.

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And there were so many fun, but I come to an often, it took me on prepared.

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It was boxes of phones in the office and people were connecting and

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sending them out by DHL and whatever.

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And then one day I was going up the lift at the elevator and I read an

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article and it said 97 or 98% of the UK population has mobile phones.

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Okay.

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And that's the, well, that's the end of that.

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Then I'm gonna shut my business.

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And I didn't think for one second okay.

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That people will buy phones because technology is changing.

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I didn't think that, you know, texting will come to surfing and

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chatting, you know, it's so important to be well-read, it's so important.

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We visionary.

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I mean, everybody goes, I go to anyone.

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I see the price of Bitcoin.

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Okay.

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Who gives it?

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Who gives a shit about price of Bitcoin, but what we should

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care about is blockchain.

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So the visionary will move beyond the marketing, the bullshit, the

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sizzle we look at how is blockchain going to change our world?

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And it is going to change our world.

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Like Bitcoin will not change my world.

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Like I could have bought $200.

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Everybody has a story story about the a hundred theories.

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It would've been $400,000 today.

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I lost my pen.

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In my wallet, right?

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So everybody's got this story stories and I have mine, but the fact is

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that I know I own an exchange.

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Okay.

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I own an exchange and in the first six months, last month,

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but the $300 million turnover in one month, because you know why?

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Because I thought to myself, hang on 200 years ago, when the Europeans were

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going from the east coast to the west coast, looking for gold, 99% of them

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didn't make money, but the people who made money, but the people that we hire

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in the, given the rooms, the food, the hairdressers, the bars, the people who

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provide the service were the ones who made the money, not the ones who went.

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So, yeah, these are the things that I, I would look at Luke, look at history,

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look beyond the sizzle, like inform your, you know, God's within us.

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Right?

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We've got the power of thought.

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Just utilize it.

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Don't listen to others.

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Limiting your beliefs.

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Thank you so much.

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Let's do this again.

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Yes, please.

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Where can people find you and when's the book coming out?

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Cause,

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well, I've been saying the same thing for the last two years.

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Just like Bradley, actually, he's been going to about four years,

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but I'm going to get it out.

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But by the end of the year, I'll get it out.

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By the end.

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I've actually written 17 chapters and 70,000 words, but I don't

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know if it's going to be a documentary or a story or a fiction.

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That's where I'm stuck.

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So thank you so

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much.

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Well, I, I certainly can't wait to read it.

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Uh, I will make sure I link to your Instagram and YouTube and all those

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great things in the show notes, but I am so, so grateful for you spending

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time with us and hanging out, uh, and just imparting a lot of wisdom on us.

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Cause that's exactly what I hope to do.

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It's my honor.

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It's my pleasure.

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And please invite me again because I loved every second of it.

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All right, everyone.

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Thank you so much for listening to dare you.

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Uh, you know where to follow him, you can check the show notes, where to follow him.

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Uh, he's definitely someone I'm going to keep in contact with.

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And once that book comes out, I don't see another way to not

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have him back on, but I will.

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So thank you for listening.

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Now.

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Look the podcast, especially after a week, like last week where you have Andy

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Frisella and Gary V and Patrick pet David on, I mean, it's kind of ridiculous.

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I want to keep these caliber of guests and the reason I can keep getting these types

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of caliber guests are number one, reviews.

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Number two.

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Are people sharing it with other people and entrepreneurs

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who could benefit from it.

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And number three is the fact that I want to interview the best

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people, because I want you to have the best information possible.

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So please look into those first couple of things.

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Okay.

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Reviewing the podcast five-star review.

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If you enjoyed it that much, leave a written review that always helps.

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And number two would be to share with someone who could benefit from it.

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That's how the word spreads.

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The little by little, the leadership blockers is just going to continue to.

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And it's going to be with your help.

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So thank you so much.