Rich Cardona Media

173. 70K to 7 Figures with Jaime Villalovos

September 15, 2021 3 comments

Article featured image:173. 70K to 7 Figures with Jaime Villalovos

“When you’re focused on where you’re at, the law of attraction states that you’ll stay where you’re at.” – Jaime Villalovos

On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with the founder and CEO of Revolution Financial Management, Jaime Villalovos, as she shares her amazing life story. Listen in as Rich and Jaime discuss personal growth, gender bias, and Jaime’s relationship with her mentor, Ed Mylett.

Jaime Villalovos and her husband Shawn created Revolution Financial Management in order to revolutionize the industry and help families around the country develop their financial literacy. For more than 20 years they have supported thousands of families in bettering their financial positions, and they are now an organization comprised of approximately 3,600 associates with over 100 offices in more than 30 states and Canada.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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  • 00:09 – Introduction
  • 03:32 – Jaime’s upbringing
  • 08:48 – Jaime’s move to California
  • 10:24 – Jaime’s decision to not finish school
  • 12:17 – Gender bias in corporate America
  • 14:41 – Jaime’s journey to financial freedom
  • 26:51 – Having a positive influence
  • 30:54 – Business plans and motivation
  • 32:20 – Jaime’s advice for female entrepreneurs
  • 38:49 – Personal growth
  • 43:29 – Jaime’s mentor, Ed Mylett
  • 49:13 – Jaime’s upcoming book
  • 52:23 – How to find Jaime online
  • 53:13 – Rich’s closing thoughts

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How to connect with Jaime:

LinkedIn

Instagram

YouTube

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

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Rocket Station

brooks@rocketstation.com

Transcript
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Hey everyone.

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Welcome back.

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The Leadership Locker.

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It's Rich Cardona.

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Yes.

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And you're in the right place.

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If you're a new entrepreneur, aspiring entrepreneur, if you're

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seasoned entrepreneur, if you're a veteran, is thinking about starting

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a business or has a business.

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You're in the right place, Mondays and Fridays.

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You're going to hear me talking about something, the things I've learned

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that I want to make sure you hear, I'm documenting the journey on Wednesdays.

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I'm going to have an industry expert or an influencer.

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Okay.

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Who's going to share very specific knowledge.

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Not today.

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You are going to hear from someone I met in the ROTC syndicate, which

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is a, it's a group, it's a community buy and my leg and Andy Frisella

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and it's not easy to get into.

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And everyone in the group is essentially, it makes you feel like you're

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eight steps behind 10 steps behind.

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And that's exactly what you need.

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If you want to level up, right?

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You can't be surrounded by people who are doing less than you.

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You need to be surrounded by people who are further ahead than you

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is exactly why this podcast is.

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Now I discovered her because she wants to start appearing as a guest on podcasts.

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And usually I'm like, dude, I pick who I want.

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But with Jamie, the response, when she put that in the Facebook thing

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was overwhelmingly like, I'll have you on I'll have you on I'll have you on

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I'm like, whoa, what's going on here.

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So I ask a couple of people and they told me her story.

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And then I looked up.

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And there was so much that I found out online, but it wasn't until we were

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in person in one of her offices in Torrance that I learned so much more.

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Now here's what I could tell you from the interview, whether you could

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detect it by listening in a little while or by the promos that I put on

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Instagram and Tik TOK or whatever is.

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She's locked the fuck on.

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I mean, she is locked on and locked in whether it is personally, whether

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it does a mom or whether it's in business or whether it's in mentoring,

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but not in an intimidating way.

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Like she's extremely personable.

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I detect just a ton of humility and the sincere desire to help

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people, especially women now.

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Are in this conversation and we are just talking, talking, talking,

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and if you listen close, you can't really see it, of course.

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But it's like, she left the podcast during the interview a bunch of

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times, cause she just went to another place and she took me with her.

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And by that, I mean the vividness in which she details her motivators, her

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drivers, her pain points, her successes.

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Is is something she's really in tune with.

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And you just don't see that a lot from people, people really gloss over things

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and podcast interviews, and she did not.

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And I'm super, super grateful for that.

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But look, she's been in the financial services industry for 20 plus years.

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She started out at the gym.

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She came out of a very, very small town in a state that you've probably not been to.

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And you're going to hear all about it, but here's what you need.

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She's a beast.

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When I walked out of that office, I was like, what am I doing?

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And that's what happens when you interview someone who's been mentored

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and, and very close with ed my leg for 20 years, she's relentless.

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And she reminded me.

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That sometimes when you think you're running a business, you're just

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playing business, let's get into it.

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We just introduced you.

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So thank you so much for joining me.

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You have a lot of things going on right now and I can't wait to dig into all of

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them, but I love to begin at the beach.

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And when I heard you interviewing someone else, it came up that both of

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you came up in poverty essentially.

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And I was kind of really want to know about that because that's going to set

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the tone for where we go on this, but can you tell me about your upbringing?

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Yeah,

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well, I grew up in a Northeastern corner of Montana.

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It's a little town called medicine lake Montana, but it's.

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Small, small towns, small thinking 225 people.

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So yes, it's a very, a farming community and there's just, no, not a lot of hope,

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big thinking, you know what I mean?

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And so I grew up in a very poor household as the oldest of six kids.

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And we grew up in a little trailer on the kind of the edge of town.

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And we grew up on welfare and WIC and, you know, government help and those things.

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And I grew up knowing I was poor.

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I hated it.

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I hated like doing the back to school, shopping at the thrift store or going

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to the, the line at the school lunches.

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And everybody had tickets and I had this punch thing that I had to turn in.

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And so I, you know, I, I, I would hear my parents down the hall at night, kind

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of at the kitchen table, arguing about.

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Which bill can we pay this month?

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I knew growing up, I didn't want to be poor.

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I didn't, I didn't like it.

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Again, I'm the oldest of six and there's a big age gap between me

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and the, the ones in the middle.

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And then there's another big age gap between the middle ones and the twins

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that were the, the, the last three born.

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And so I always kind of had this responsibility to feeling like I have.

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Do something else, do something more, set an example and help them the

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first one comprehending everything that was happening.

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So did you feel like you had to kind of explain that to your siblings?

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Like,

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I didn't want to, I remember one winter.

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Happened a couple of times actually, but I remember waking

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up in Northeastern Montana.

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It is cold in the winter.

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So you get the Alaska winds that kind of cut right through there.

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It's like 30 below with the windshield factor.

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And I remember waking up and I could see my breath and thinking, oh, we can't

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even afford propane to heat our house.

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And I got gathered my sisters out of their rooms and I brought him into the bathroom

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and I plugged in one of those little ones.

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Space heaters and it was doing their hair and singing songs with them.

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And I remember thinking, I, I don't want them to know like that this

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is, this is happening right now.

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So yeah, I mean, we were always as positive as we could, but you

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know, my dad would say, well, these are, this is kind of how it is.

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And life's you know what, and then you die.

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It's the most motivating that way.

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And I always hear them complain about, yeah, Their boss or their

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job or the whatever situation, or if we didn't have food that winter

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maybe, and had a friend had given him, given us a pig, one winter as a.

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Just to help us out.

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And I remember thinking like, why don't we move?

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Why don't you go where you can get a better job?

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You know?

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I just didn't understand it.

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So, yeah.

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So I just I didn't want that for my, you know, my children, my family.

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I didn't want to have them hear us fight about money.

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Both my husband and I, our parents divorced mostly because of

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arguments, financial situations.

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And

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if you can.

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At what point did you say?

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I'm not sure what the expectations they have of me are, but I know what

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I want and I'm going to actually start working my way towards

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that.

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So I would come out to California here and there when I was younger and

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vacation because my parents had divorced.

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And then I was back in Montana with my dad and my stepmom, but I'd come out here

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and It wasn't much different here, but, but it still, there was more opportunity.

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Yeah.

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So I thought, gosh, you know, I'm going to have to pay my way through school.

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I'm going to have to work hard, you know?

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And so as soon as I graduated high school, I came out to California with

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the idea of I'm gonna get a good job.

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I'm going to pay my way through school and you know, be able to hopefully

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at least send money back home.

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What did you want to do?

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At that point?

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I didn't know.

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I mean, growing up, growing up without one high school English teacher were

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people, you know, I just, I don't ever recall having a conversation with an

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adult or a teacher or a counselor saying.

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You know, think about college Jamie, or what do you want to be Jamie?

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I just don't ever recall ever having those conversations.

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So my idea was I was going to work.

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I was going to, I was going to work hard.

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I was going to, again, just go to school, find out.

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So find something I enjoyed passionate, you know?

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But really also by that point, when, when I was moving out.

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And those twins were born.

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My step-mom had become really ill and she was on I be narcotics and,

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you know, couldn't get out of bed.

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And so I really wanted to be able to get to a position, to help them, to support

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them, to send money back home, to get my sisters out of a negative situation too.

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So that'd be kind of became a driver.

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It's interesting because I don't feel or detect that you were angered as, by

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any of these situations, as much as you felt inclined to do something about them.

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And that seems to like have transcended into your professional career,

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which your first, your first job

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was what?

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Well, when I first got here to California, I went to everywhere.

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I could walk, you know, it just to get a job.

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Yeah.

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You know saving money.

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And so my first job was a blockbuster video and similar to like a

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99 cent store next door to me.

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And I was whatever shift they would give me.

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I was just working all the time to be able to save, to buy a car.

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Better job.

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I just in shock.

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And as soon as I had a car, I bought this horrible 89 Dodge Daytona use card.

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It had like, I think they were like bullet holes on the side of it.

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Got me from point a to point B.

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So then I S I got a job at a gym.

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Yeah, well, there was another gym before that, and then I got a job at Bally's and

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it quickly, I got promoted to management.

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I, I, based on work ethic, I guess I, when I think about my second month, I was

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promoted to assistant manager and then manager then got my own club very quickly.

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So with that, it went from.

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Working, you know, minimal hours to typically 11 hours a day with my schedule.

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So less and less time I could spend in school.

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And it wasn't, that school was hard.

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I just, I just didn't have the time I was working sometimes

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six, sometimes seven days a week.

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Did you

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finish school?

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No.

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No, I, I, the decision then I mean, were you about to disappoint anyone

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when you decided that for yourself?

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Like I'm not going to go to school any longer.

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There was no one, like, you know what I mean?

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There was no conversations about that.

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That was just something I thought I should do, you know, but again, it went from

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minimum wage to at least 40,000 salary.

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I was 20 years old.

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And and again, I felt like I needed to do that.

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I needed to be able to pay my bills and to help family and those things.

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So I again kept getting promoted.

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And, but again, my hours didn't, they were still those long hours.

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And I worked there for about four and a half years.

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What did you learn about yourself in that four years?

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Well, I, I learned to, yeah.

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I was working as like a self-employed person, the effort, the energy I was

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putting into it, I was on commission.

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So I was working like a self-employed person, but

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being treated like an employee.

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So I learned, I didn't, I didn't want to be an employee.

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I wanted control of my time.

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You know, I also had developed great work ethic there, but I learned

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how to deal with people at the gym.

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It's a very unusual environment.

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You know, you people go in there and they like lose their minds.

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So I would have to break up fights.

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People body slamming each other in the, in the weight room.

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In other times I remember little old men would try to pick fights with,

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you know, big guys over a treadmill.

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Like, come on, let's go.

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I'm like, you really want to do this it's so I, I had to, even though it's young,

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I had to manage people way older than me.

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So I had to learn how to lead, not just manage.

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And I had to just learn people skills.

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And so I was grateful for that, but.

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Yeah, because after a while I had hit an income ceiling.

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I couldn't make any more money.

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Yup.

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In this first stint for that four years.

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The other question I want to ask and I ask this because I've heard you talk about

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it in some of the interviews you've done.

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Were you noticing at that point, any indications of a gender bias or an

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inequality in pay or anything like that?

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Not to just kind of like start something, but just, I want to know.

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I mean, I think

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in there is that in corporate America, in general, for me, I just thought it's

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like, you know what, I'm going to outwork everyone here and I'm going to earn it.

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And typically I did it just, it was a very unusual moment.

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It's, you know, I thought at first.

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You know, the gym, this is a great environment.

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People trying to improve themselves, people trying to,

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you know, trying to get in shape.

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And it wasn't that environmental.

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It was a very high pressure.

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Sales environment.

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And so what I noticed was yeah, we worked hard, but it was also high

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pressure, high stress, high quotas.

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And so even though I was number one, my, my reward for that would be to raise

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my quarter to hit, you know, higher.

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They called it budget.

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But I started noticing co managers that they'd been there

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for years longer than I had.

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And they were just so stressed out.

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They didn't get to see their kids, but one of the gals, she was 29.

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She had war heart.

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Her doctor had her wearing a heart monitor because she would

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have constant anxiety attacks.

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That's so ironic being at a gym, especially.

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Yeah.

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Another guy, he was when he started, he was in shape.

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He was a football player.

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And by the time he left, his doctor said you can't work here.

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He was like 200 pounds overweight and it was just a really kind

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of stressful environment.

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And again, you know, I was young, it wasn't a very hard job.

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It was just a stressful job.

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I was making about 75,000 when I was there, leaving there and.

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And I thought, well, you know, this is, this is not that bad.

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But then again, after four and a half years, I realized, you know, these

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co-managers of mine who had been there 14 years, 10 years longer than me still

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didn't get to see their kids still had those crappy hours, still had no control

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of their time and they're stuck there.

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And I felt like, you know, every, every day when I would go into that

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gym, that I was wasting my life, I felt like I'm wasting my time.

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I could, if I could put my heart into something that was mine, I put my passion

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and my energy in something that was mine.

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I could be successful, but what, you know, I'm 22 at that point.

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And I hadn't finished college who was going to give me a shot.

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Ideally I would love to have my own business, but what, yeah.

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Yeah.

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Well, you've talked about your why and, and having, you know, passion for

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what you're doing when you knew then at 22, even if it's 22, it's still like.

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That we look into it.

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How did you start to look around to determine like,

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what, what do I want to do?

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Like, what does drive me or who do I want to serve?

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What kind of thoughts did you have or have?

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So

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I remember I remember being at the gym and going upstairs to go to, there was

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a Western bagel upstairs and I wanted to go get a bagel and I remember.

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Them calling Jamie, come down here, come down there.

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There's this going on?

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That going on?

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And I'm like, I can't go upstairs to get a bagel.

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You know, sometimes I'd have to go to the bathroom and

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they're like, where are you at?

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Where are you?

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And I'm like, really?

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I just thought I have zero control of my life.

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You know what I mean?

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And no matter how hard I work, there's no other reward.

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This is it.

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You know?

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And so at that point it was around the time they started asking me to kind of

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fix bad problem areas, you know, like, Hey, there's a grand opening of this gym.

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Can you go there?

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This Yemen's on the tank.

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Can you go there?

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So I grand opened a club in LA west LA and when I got there.

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You know it was, it was, it was a dirt, it was dirt.

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It was a huge hole and a wood plank that I'm walking across

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trying to sell gym memberships.

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And I'm like selling, this is gonna be beautiful.

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There's going to be roads of TVs.

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And the, you know, the treadmills are going to be here and I'm

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having to sell this club.

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Right.

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And I'm having barbecues parking lot just to kind of get people to show up and.

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Every single day for two months, I was number one in the

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company and pre-sold that gym.

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And what happened was when I got my paycheck, I just got kicked

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into a higher tax bracket.

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Oh yeah.

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And I thought so stupid.

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This is a total rat race.

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There's no light at the end of this tunnel.

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This is not what I want.

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What do I want?

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So I just started realizing I was very dissatisfied and that there,

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there has to be something better.

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And so you know, I started asking people like, Hey, you know,

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do you know anybody in this?

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And don't you that my schedule was so hectic that it was even hard just

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to even try to put out a resume.

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That's kind of how you did it back then.

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There wasn't monster.com or those things.

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So I had a friend, he was a commercial real estate broker

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to get your real estate license.

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I know a lot of people in residential, you do amazing.

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I'm like, well, I, well, that sounds better than this.

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I can at least have my own schedule.

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Right.

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So I went and got my real estate license and started doing real estate.

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And I literally would go to a real estate company from like eight to 11 and then

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11 to 11 to the gym and trying to learn.

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But honestly, there was no system.

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There was no support.

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My broken for my entire training on the real estate side, there was no training.

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There was no support.

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So he said my entire training was.

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There's a stack of closed loans over there.

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You can learn how to put the paperwork together.

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There's the computers of there.

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You can learn how to read rate sheets and you can listen to

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the guys, make phone calls.

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Oh bye.

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By the way, write a letter to all your friends and family and let them

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know that you're in the business.

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So in case.

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Refinancing or something.

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So I did that and I, and I was like telling people to be known

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anybody, you know, I won't charge them that much, you know?

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And so I was learning realized real fast that even though that's,

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self-employed, it's still a rat race, you're still looking for, you know,

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filling your pipeline all the time.

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Still have no freedom.

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That's not what I wanted.

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And so I started doing mortgage and thought was a little bit

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more control of my pay, you know, with the real estate sales.

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There are so many things outside of my control, you know, appraisal

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could come in wrong or whatever.

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So I was learning the mortgage and and then I actually met a lady at the

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gym who had just had her second child and she had never worked out before.

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So I was super intimidated here.

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I am like trying to meet my quota for a membership and she's like,

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oh yeah, So, you know, good with people, you should meet my husband,

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you know, he's looking for people.

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And so I was introduced to the business that I'm in now and fortunate to

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have a lot of great mentors there.

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But for me, I think it was always, I was always driven by, and it's so funny

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because years ago, We were already, I was already seven figure earner.

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And I told my husband, I'm like, when we're rich, we should do this.

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He's like Jamie, you're rich.

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And I'm like, no.

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And so I think in the beginning, and I don't, it's probably not good,

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but I did that fear of being poor.

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Again, it's that fear of, you know, not knowing if you know, what's next.

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And so I wanted to get to a situation where.

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I had savings.

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I had a lot of savings.

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I had no matter, you know, no matter what the economy did, I didn't

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want to be at the mercy of a boss.

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I didn't want to be at the mercy of the economy ever again.

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Things like COVID and you know, I didn't want any of those things to

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ever have to face me that the decisions that I make are best for my family,

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no matter what's going on around me.

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You're the third successful entrepreneur I've interviewed today.

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And autonomy has been said, literally, every interview today and autonomy seems

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like something we all want so desperately.

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However, in entrepreneurship and high pressure, it seems obviously

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you're more than cut out for it.

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But.

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There's a different threshold for others where it becomes too much or the

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rejection becomes too much or whatever.

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And all of a sudden autonomy and all of these things seem out of reach.

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What would you say to these people who are thinking like, you know

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what, I'm just going to go back and just get a bullshit job.

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Yeah,

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I think it's hard.

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I mean, it's when you're starting as an entrepreneur, it's, everything's

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outside of your comfort zone.

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You know what I mean?

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Like, to me, it was a completely different industry that I started in.

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I didn't know anything.

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Why am I know she's financed?

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I didn't know anything about finance.

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When she, when this girl asked me like, Hey, you should meet my husband.

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He's looking for good people.

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I said, you know, inside I'm like it had been discovered or something.

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I'm like, yes, it, what is it?

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And

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. And as you said, what she goes, well, you

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And when she said securities, no idea what security is.

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Home alarm sales, like a security guard.

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Now it doesn't make sense.

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So what I was so hungry for change.

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That I said, sure, when can I meet your husband?

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And you know, and I came in and I found out it was finance.

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I'm like, oh my gosh.

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Like, and it was at the end of 99.

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And if you remember.

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Everyone was day trading.

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There was the.com bubble that was about to burst.

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And so it's just seemed like everyone knew all about this stuff.

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And I knew absolutely nothing.

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And I was 22 and I was a female, you know?

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And so I was, it was a very male dominated industry, you know?

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And so I walked into an office where the men, it was all men and it was much older.

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Most of them had come from the industry and, and and so.

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Again to me though, I thought, well, you know, this seems like a great environment.

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It seemed like there was system and mentors finally, like I've

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been looking for someone to help me and hold my hand through it.

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But also that it was a very high paying industry.

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Right.

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So I thought, well, I'll give it a shot.

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You know, long-term, it's going to be better than this, you know?

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And so I kind of always looked at the alternative.

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I remember, you know, starting out and it was a, it was a Saturday morning

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and I'm kinda like training my guys.

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I just felt like I'm talking to the wall, like no one's listening and that.

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We were stagnant.

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And I was so frustrated and I left, I left my guys when they were doing their

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thing and I left and I went to that bagel shop above valleys, and I got myself

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a bagel and I ate that big along the steps right there, looking at Valley's

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watching all these people walk in and out.

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And then I walked in because no one really cares and I just walked out.

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Walked around the gym, which I had to do all like every single day.

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And I just walked through the gym and I could smell the smells and I

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could hear the waits being rewrapped and I could hear, you know, the, the,

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the clanging and the treadmills and the TVs and just the, literally I'm

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watching you go there right now in your head.

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So vivid

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and I just brought myself back.

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Oh, my gosh, it is what I'm doing is so worth it.

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I don't want this.

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I don't want this life.

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I don't want this job.

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So I always thought of the alternative, you know what I mean?

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So there's a job for the rest of my life that I'm making someone else

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wealthy, that I'm at the slave of, you know, the bosses whim or the

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economy changing the industry shifting.

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I just didn't want that anymore.

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I wanted freedom.

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And so yeah, success demands.

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You pay a price.

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That price is you're going to be uncomfortable.

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Most of the time for a while.

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And, and you're gonna have to do things that you just maybe just not

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used to, and you're going to have to work really, really hard, you know?

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And it's

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more than

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you think, you know, honestly, you, but I remember telling myself like,

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Hey, you know, like there was a period where we were going through for.

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Promotion or just kind of a certain goal.

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And it was, it was a big one and it was almost almost impossible.

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I felt like so excited.

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And like an elephant was sitting on my chest at the same time, like, oh my gosh.

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And we were working so hard and I was, I was literally in the office by 8:00 AM.

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Didn't leave till after midnight, most nights for like 90 days.

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Right.

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But honestly, that time in my careers, I look back and it's probably.

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Fun time, you know what I mean?

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But it was the best time because that's, when you find out what you're made of,

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that's when you find out like, man, what are you really, really willing

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to do to make your dreams happen?

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So I grew, I grew so much if I didn't do that, I wouldn't be here.

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The leader to others that I am today.

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So but it was fun during that time we'd be in the office late and, you

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know, just eating whatever and having these great conversations and, you

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know, and just challenging ourselves.

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So so I dunno, I don't regret any of it again.

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I think success demands.

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You pay a price.

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I would rather pay that price upfront and in full versus the price of

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regret and being an employee forever, you know, dealing with that type

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of crap for the rest of my life.

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Yeah.

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All right, everyone real quick.

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I want to talk to you about our sponsor rocket station, who helped

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me get my first virtual assistant, who is actually my obsolete.

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And she just runs circles around so many people.

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I know in terms of how much he accomplishes on any given day.

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But look, I'm going to tell you some of the things that my team does.

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Okay.

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Who are comprised of contractor virtual assistants.

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If you want to call them that, I call them different things.

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Onboarding documents, document audits, process audits, documentation.

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The podcast tracker setting up, clarify, setting up our project management system,

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onboarding, creating lead magnets, daily, weekly, monthly responsibilities,

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coordinating a flight for me, doing a little bit of prospecting via email

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for me, responding to comments for me on social media that are one line.

Speaker:

More reaching out to clients, emailing clients, send proposals.

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These are all the things virtual assistants do.

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This is what my team does.

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I don't do any of that stuff.

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I have input on it, but I usually stay out because I don't have time for that.

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And it doesn't mean I'm too good for it.

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It just means I know where I need to focus my time.

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And that is why I did it.

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And it hadn't not been for rocket station.

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I'd be up shit's Creek without a paddle.

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Rocket is going to help you level up by getting an adding people to you.

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Okay.

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They're based out of Dallas, they're international, virtual assistance.

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They're unbelievably affordable.

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They come with oversight and a team that is going to help you.

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Okay.

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It is not just you in the virtual assistant, which

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is what's going to happen.

Speaker:

If you just go look anywhere else for freelancer, there is support.

Speaker:

There are reminders, there is streamlined manners in which you deal

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with each other and which you pay, you know, the monthly rate and all that.

Speaker:

If you want 25% off your process mapping, which is a documented all the processes

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that you want to hand off, then you've got to listen to the end of the episode, and

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I will get you who to email, how to get in touch with them, just set up and talk.

Speaker:

But if you're listening to this, think of five things that you've done

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did yesterday or today already you know, you don't need to be doing and

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imagine what you would do if someone else was taking that over for you.

Speaker:

Let's get back to the show.

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So you were 70 K and then you eventually got to seven figures

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and you're thrilled about it.

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Your husband's thrilled about it.

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Can you talk to me about when you are now in a position to influence

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others, you are leading men and women, but particularly women showing them.

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And, and this is important to me cause I'm a girl dad.

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And like, I want them to know.

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Whatever it is like, I'm not going to be that dad.

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It's like, whatever you want to do, you could do like, I mean it, and there's

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people like you, I want to have these conversations with, but tell me about

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the influence you started to see you

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yourself having.

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Yeah, definitely.

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I, I feel like that's what leadership is.

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It's just, it's just influence, it's being able to influence

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a cause or a people for good.

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But I remember that was kind of my, why coming up when I,

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when I started as entrepre.

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You know, quit my job, $70,000 a year.

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And in our industry, you have to get licensed back

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then it took like nine months

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you had to wait nine months before you could make any money.

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I cut down all my expenses, moved out of the townhouse that I was in

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and, and just went like super lean and mean I wanted to be able to focus

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on my business and I'm ready to go.

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You know, in the office early, like what do I do at first?

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I felt like, wow, this is amazing.

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I can go get myself a bagel if I want to, without being, you know,

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nagged and, and those things.

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So I felt that freedom, but then I also felt the pressure of like,

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okay, I have to get this going.

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And.

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You know, eventually I started making money and that was great.

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Started making money more money than I was making at my job again.

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Great.

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But then you, you want influence, you want to be able to really be

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able to help my family back home.

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And, and one of my biggest why's was kind of what you mentioned.

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I wanted to be an example to my younger sisters.

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I remember one time being in my first office and things were going all right.

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And I was making about a hundred grand a year, you know, again, control my time.

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Things are good.

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And I actually, I had, my feet had never happened.

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So I had had my feet up and we were kind of talking about the guys in the

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office and my sister called and she was about nine years old at that time.

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And she called and we're having a chat and all of a sudden she's.

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Well, I, I heard it in the background.

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I heard mommy's dead, mommy's dead.

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And my sister said, hold on a second.

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And I heard all this chaos and I heard my sister kind of doing

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some rumbling things around.

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Finally, she gets back to the phone.

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I'm like, well, what's going on?

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Why were the twins screaming?

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Well, my nine year old sister was the mom of the household.

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At that time, my step-mom was too ill to take care of him.

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She was too old to get out of bed, but I guess she had tried to get out of

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bed and she had passed out on the floor and she said she had to like smack her,

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pour water on her, drag her back to bed.

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And my nine-year-old sister.

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Taking these twins to, to daycare.

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She was going to the grocery every single day, had you at the grocery store to get

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groceries because she can't carry two twins and grow, you know, full groceries.

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So she had to go every day, she had to make dinner for the rest of the kids.

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And so we were talking and I said, why didn't you call 9 1 1?

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She said, oh, no, they said not to, because they don't want us to be tired.

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And it was so like, it hit me so hard.

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I got off the phone and I walked to the office to the bathroom,

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down the hall, in the office.

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And I looked at myself in my house.

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I was crying and I just said, you're wasting your time.

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You're wasting time.

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I am right now.

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Get it together.

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Like they are counting on you.

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Like, you're the one there's no one else.

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There's no one else that's going to come in and say, there's no one.

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There's no one else.

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It's all up to you.

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And I was so mad at myself at that point.

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Like.

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There there's so much more you could be doing.

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And at that point, like I worked, like, I kind of had a vision of

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what I wanted for my life, for my kids and my family for my sisters.

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And for my business.

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And I just started working on all these, all the things that might be

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our mentors teach you, you know, all the things about having clarity of your

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goals, having them written, reading them everyday, reading them out loud in

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the business plan.

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You said before.

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When you wake up, when you go to bed, I heard you talking about

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that and I severely underestimate the power of a business plan.

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And I was listening to you and reminded that you have to just be completely in

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touch with everything you want to happen

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and being able to see it and touch it.

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And so I just got really clear on what the end zone is, you know

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what I mean, what I really wanted.

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And so every day was with that in mind.

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I, I worked every day, like people said, well, Jamie, how many

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phone calls do you make in a day?

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As many as I can.

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How many appointments you do, as many as I can.

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I was just trying to move that vision closer to today.

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And so I, I would have my business plan and my, you know, wise and all stuff.

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But I remember during that time I had on my computer cause I'd sit at

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my desk and that was kind of like the first thing I would see taped.

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If you hit this goal, you're getting your sister, I'll have the time, the money,

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the resources, the influence, to be able to go and get her out of that situation.

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And so that was just having my goals attached to something that

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was like SU like super emotional.

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So my business plan became like an emotional game plan when things were

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tough, you know, it was my emotions that were so strong, pulled rank over

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my fierce or over my doubts or over my just not wanting to do something.

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You know what I mean?

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So, and that just drove me.

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This

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is unbelievable.

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I did not know all this prior to coming, but the funny thing is.

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You know, when you're on an airplane and they give you the brief, like

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put that mask on yourself first.

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Like if you hadn't done that, then you wouldn't.

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Put yourself in a position to be able to help to begin with, like

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you took, you took control, you left you, you started school side,

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it wasn't for me, you were working.

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You you're like, not for me.

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This is what I'm going to do.

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So then you have your own family.

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You have, you're a mother of four.

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I want to, we're going to switch a little bit because you know, I,

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I saw a couple posts about that as well about the kind of guilt.

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Now here you are.

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You know, providing, but I see how unbelievably in touch you are with your

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family, for someone who is as successful as you it seems like there is a balance

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and everyone's balance is unique to them.

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What would you say to some of the women out there who are maybe in

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this position or maybe approaching a trajectory or add that trajectory

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being like, here's how I do it.

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So yeah, being a mom mompreneur you can get, it can get tough.

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I think you know, I have four, I have my youngest now, six, my oldest is 16

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and then I have an 11 and a 13 year old.

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And so I've kind of been in all those stages.

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Like I have two teenagers now, but I remember when I was

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single starting my business.

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I could be in there at eight.

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I could beat, you know, be there until 2:00 AM.

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And you know, sometimes we're so focused on my goal that I forget to eat.

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When you have kids, you can't forget to feed them.

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It's different.

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Like you have to, you have to like, the family has to be first.

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And so I've seen so many entrepreneurs fail in that area.

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You know, they're successful in business and they have, you know, all the money,

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but then they're divorced or their kids don't like them, you know, I've

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seen over and over and over again.

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So what I did was I went and just like I do in every area of my

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life, I went and found mentors.

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I found role models.

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I found associations of people.

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That, that proved to me that you can win big time.

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You can chase your biggest dreams.

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You can, you know, have all of these things that you really want in, in, in

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leadership and, you know, in success and the stream life and travel the world and

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have your family and your faith come from.

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So I knew that it can be done if they can do it.

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That means so can I write just like, just like anything else?

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So I studied the ones that I thought were great at that.

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And, and then, you know, again, I had this ideal life.

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I mean, my business plan, I was going to hit this, you know, certain level

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then get pregnant the next time.

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And I did and I did.

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Yeah.

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But when I had my baby, my first baby, my daughter, it

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was like, I didn't miss a beat.

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I just, I just brought her to the office with me.

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And I, I had her in a little swing next to me.

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I would, I would do appointments.

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I would, you know, breastfeeding and I'd pass off the baby to like,

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she had lots of ants in the office.

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But then when she became about 18 months old, That was the first time, like in

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my business that I felt distracted.

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And I, and I know, I just know, like, if you're mentally you're distracted.

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That's destruction, you know, in, in business.

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So I had to figure it out.

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I had to figure it out quick.

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And so I, again, just kind of went to mentors and different people and

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I said, okay, you know, when you went through this, when you started having

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kids, how did you make that transition?

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And they were very supportive.

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Hey, you can, you're making enough money, residually, Jamie,

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you can quit if you want to.

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And, and, you know, they were just there.

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This extreme of like, you know, you can do this or if that's not what

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you want to do, you know, you can, you can just make some tweaks here.

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And so I, I, that made sense to me.

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I had to tweak my schedule.

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I had to tweak my list, like how I was doing things, because I

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think a lot of, especially moms.

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I coach so many people in the guys feel the same way

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they're feeling out of balance.

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They're feeling torn too.

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And so the feeling is when I'm at work, like, am I spending enough time at home?

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Am I spend enough time with my kid?

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Am I doing this right?

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Am I going to screw them up?

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Or if I'm at home, am I, am I neglecting my business?

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Am I still on, on it?

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Am I still competitive?

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Am I still relevant?

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You know, so all these thoughts come into this, you know,

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distraction in your mindset.

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And so what I did was I kind of sat down and so.

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How can I make my schedule different?

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How can I delegate more?

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How can I get, how can I get more develop leaders in place.

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To pass some of these things off to how can I maybe even get some staff

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now that I'm making money, you know, to, to handle some of these things.

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And I know sometimes, sometimes people can be control freaks and

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they're like, oh, I got to do it myself, but it's not necessarily true.

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And so I got much better at delegating and, you know, developing strong leaders

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that I can trust and all my offices and to run the show with her without me.

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So,

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yeah, like you went to the office with your dog.

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You're still going after it for many.

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Oh, I did that though.

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Mostly is because I do coach a lot of women and I didn't, if I, if I say, oh,

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I'm going to stay home and, you know, take my maternity leave and just do nothing.

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Then it gives them an excuse to, so I wanted to show them that they can do it.

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And honestly, if you build the right environment in your business,

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I liked my kids being around it.

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You know, they're around leaders, they're around positive people.

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There are lot of people that are challenging them to become

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better versions of themselves.

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They're hearing good stuff constantly.

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So I don't mind that my kids are there and I like the environment

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to be a family environment.

Speaker:

Even if you felt the tugs of the family, it seems like you were so vested in

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all the effort you put to just get to where you were, that it wasn't even

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a possibility for you to walk away.

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No, I love what I do.

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I love what I do.

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I, I think all the time, like what, what I want to just stay at home and

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be a Pinterest mom or something, and it doesn't sound appealing to me.

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And again, it's great.

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If you want to do that, I think.

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That stay-at-home moms are the hardest working people.

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They deserve the most recognition of anybody, but I love what I do.

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And I, I love mentoring, you know, in our business and, and

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the leadership role that I have.

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And they're like my family too, but I just, I just adjusted things.

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So, you know, with, with my daughter coming in and then the second one, the

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second one, wasn't a hard adjustment or the third was a hard adjustment.

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Three is the hardest.

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And I felt like, oh my gosh, I'm out.

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And again, had to go back to tweaking things.

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How can I, you know,

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you write everything down and when you explain it, it just seems like you

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work out problems on paper really well.

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Well, what I'll do is if I feel like I'm plateauing, or I feel

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like I'm in a rut or, you know, distracted I'll work on my vision.

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So many people try to work on the problem.

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They focus on where they're at, when you're focusing on where you're at,

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it's just this big problem in your face.

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But if you can focus on where you want to go, You get excited about it

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again, you're like, man, I love this.

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I love the life.

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I want to create you fall in love with that.

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And so then you gravitate towards it because that's what you're focused on.

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And so it kind of becomes like, oh, that's a small thing to a giant, like this is

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not a big deal, but when you're focused on the problem, it's a big thing that

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you're, and it, and when you're focused on where you're at, the law of attraction

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says you stay right where you're at.

Speaker:

So I guess it's putting on paper of more.

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I just, I just did a recently have created a business plan.

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That's a hundred years deep after I'm passed away for my posterity,

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you know, things that we want to do contribution wise and charity wise.

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So and I'm excited about, so why would I want to stop, you know, and here's

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a thing when there's that tweak or that shift of, okay, now I have one

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kid to three kids to whatever it or going from employee to entrepreneur,

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all it is is personal growth.

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It's increasing your capacity.

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Right.

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So I had this gallows employee and she really wanted to do the business.

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And she was all excited about she's like, I love this, you know, helping people

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and, you know, I love everything about it.

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But then when it comes to getting the work done, she was like, Jamie,

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I don't know if I can do this.

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And people tend to grab it, grab on excuses, grab to excuses when

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things get tough or uncomfortable.

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And so she said, Jamie, I don't think I can be an entrepreneur because it's

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taking too much away from my face.

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I said, well, you're doing it wrong girl, because this should just

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enhance every area of your life, your family, your fitness, your faith.

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It shouldn't have all of it.

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And she said, well, I just feel like I'm getting I'm spread too thin.

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And I'm just not being able to do it enough church stuff.

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And she's, she's, she's young.

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She didn't, she didn't have any kids yet, but she did have a boyfriend that

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they were about to get married and they were talking about having kids.

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And I said, well, think about when you.

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Let's say you're starting to have kids.

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You have one kid, you have two kids.

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Would you say man, kids, this is a lot of work.

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I didn't know it was gonna be this much work.

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It's taking too much time away from my faith.

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I think I'm going to get rid of my kids.

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No, do that.

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What would you do?

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You'd have to increase your capacity.

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You'd have to personally grow right as a parent.

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So same thing.

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Entrepreneur.

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Yeah, you're going to have to continue to grow.

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And and I love that.

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I think that's what we all should be doing.

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Just constantly, never ending personal development.

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Do

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you think that personal growth adding to your bandwidth or your

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capacity means decreasing elsewhere?

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Like what are the types of things that you subtract from your life

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in order to increase your capacity?

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I think increasing your capacity to me is more on personal growth.

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So I have to grow in.

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I have to grow in all these different areas of life, but there

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is also, it's not necessarily the same as capacity, but let's say

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I just have too much on my plate.

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So.

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We can feel guilty if we're not in the kids' classroom all the time.

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Or I've been asked to be like the head of the PTA.

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It's like an automatic, like me being the head of the PTA is not going to

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help my kids learn more or be happier.

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Well, that's cool.

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It's not, it's not going to, but I have a script for all that stuff.

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So when they asked me, can you be the head of.

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I said, oh, you know, that's so honored, you know, that you would even

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ask me, let me talk to my husband.

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And then I send them an email saying, oh, you know, thank you so much

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for asking, but he thinks I have too much on my plate right now,

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which is pretty much always true.

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So and so I said, but, you know, let me know if there's any volunteer

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opportunities throughout the school year, you know, be in the classroom, help out.

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And the kids love you to be in the classroom.

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You don't have to be there as a PTA president though.

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Sure.

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And so here's the thing I've learned too.

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As, as a mom, as a business owner, I have, you know, 4,000 people that I have

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to mentor at least on a monthly basis.

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And I have my four that I have to nurture as well.

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You know, so if I'm going to take on a new.

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A big new project or a big new goal.

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I typically will try to see what I can take off my plate if I'm

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going to add something big onto it.

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So to me that's different than capacity.

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Like, you know, capacity is personal growth to be able to still get the

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job done and get the goals done.

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You've know there's stuff going on.

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Yeah, that's a great

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distinction.

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Yeah.

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I didn't, I never really thought of it that way.

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So the difference between capacity and growth and speaking of growth,

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you've mentioned mentors a lot.

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Obviously one of them is at my leg.

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Can you talk to me about yeah, like about your relationship and how he's

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kind of helped you guide through all this and it helps you get to work?

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Yeah, it is.

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I've had, I've been lucky.

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I was so lucky to have.

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Amazing mentors.

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But you know, I think that most of these guys, guys like ed, they're looking for

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leaders, they successful entrepreneur, great guys like ed, they're looking

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to raise up the next generation.

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And so a lot of times it's just looking for them and asking,

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you know, asking for the help.

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And I've seen so many people make the mistake.

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They'll say I had a thing at my house and one of the guys came up to me.

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He's like, I didn't, I didn't want to come.

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Cause I didn't think I deserved it.

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Big enough yet, or I'm not, I haven't earned it yet.

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I say, Hey, we're supposed to be here.

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I wouldn't have been buying it.

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It's supposed to be in this mentoring session.

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Yeah.

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But a lot of people think that way, they think, you know, when I'm,

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when I'm bigger or when I'm more successful, then I have earned his time.

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Then I can reach out when I'm on his level.

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Nope.

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See these, these big leaders, like an editor.

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It's like he has there's leverage there.

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It's like he has a job and crane to pull you up.

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Right.

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There's there's power in proximity.

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There's power in, in know this associations.

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So I've had great guys you know, others besides ed.

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But when I was new, I had a guy that was a great guy.

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He's a executive producer of the movie think and grow rich

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Napoleon hill foundation asked him to make the movie of the book.

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The great.

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And so he was the guy who coached me in the beginning.

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And he made everything look easy.

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So I thought, oh man, I can do this.

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And then and then I had guys like ed, my let and others.

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And you know, ed was far, he was a few hours away, at least.

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Yeah.

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And he would have this Monday morning, he called it his full-timers meeting

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and he'd have it like once a, a month.

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And I would get up at, I don't even know what time it was still dark out.

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And I would drive down there and I would sneak into that meeting.

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And ed will tell you, like, I'm sitting there like fighting people for the front

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row, like at the edge of my seat, taking notes, like taking notes on everything

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he said, but then also how he said it and like, wow, I was on a speaker.

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Like, like ed is a very, you know, he's a great public speaker, but I'd watch

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like when he'd walk into the audience or how he would use his hands and stuff.

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And I just take notes of everything and then I would come back.

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And try to give that meeting my little, my little agency, but I remember one

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time being at Ed's house and I was newer in the business and you know,

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looking at his beautiful dream home, and this is, this was years ago.

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So he was, he was probably just hitting his like first million income.

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But to me that was a, it was a big deal.

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And so we were sitting in the living room and I remember like everyone

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kind of just chatting and talking and I'm literally sitting at his.

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With my notebook, just waiting for anything to come

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out of his mouth, you know?

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And and he gave a great meeting and, and lesson.

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And then afterwards, we went to this restaurant and they were watching some

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MMA or boxing or something, and they were eating and I was outside in the

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cold pacing, back and forth calling every single one of my guys in my company.

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I don't know what time this thing's going to be done, but we're meeting.

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I don't care if it's one o'clock in the morning, we're having

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an emergency meeting tonight.

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We're going to implement everything that this guy just said.

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So to me it's, first of all, there's an interest.

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You know, you just have to find someone who is on your path, just

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further down your path, who is who, who is where you want to be.

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And I like them to have values, not just in they're successful in

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business, but they also are where I would like to be in other areas like

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a hundred percent, you know, family and those things that would be ideal.

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But then you have to reach out, you have to answer your questions.

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And then the secret of like guys like ed or these great mentors

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is when they do give you this.

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Implement like at the speed of instruction and because they do

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want to help, but they don't want.

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Waste their time either.

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You know what I mean?

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If they know you're going to be coachable, they'll keep giving it to you.

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Something to be said about when guys like him or, you know, other people that

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I know and I've implemented something, that's a victory for them, right?

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Like they're used to people not doing it.

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Right.

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Like taking great notes, sending them a DM saying that was

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amazing and not doing anything.

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But when I asked what a gentleman I was interviewing earlier today, I

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said, what can I possibly do for you?

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You know, What can I say for your business or the program to

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help he's like, you already are.

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He's like, you're succeeding, you're implementing some of the things.

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And I didn't even like put that together.

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Do you know what I mean?

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But yeah, I think that's amazing.

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I think you're right.

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If you want that information and you're willing to get up before the sun's

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up to, to get it and then implemented then of course you're going to win.

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Yeah,

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I remember this.

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There's this other guy.

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He's, he's a great guy too.

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That was a big influence on my business.

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And he's almost a billionaire now, but.

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I don't know how I even got his phone number.

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I cons one and giving you his phone number, but I called them up and I said,

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Hey, I heard you're doing a meeting in San Diego again with traffic three hours away.

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Right.

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And I said, can I, can I pick it from the airport?

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My husband, I will pick you up from the airport and I'll drive you to the venue.

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He's like, all right, no one else.

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Sure.

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So we pick them up, like literally drive three hours.

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To pick them up from the airport to take him 15 minutes to the hotel, set outside,

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wait for him to be done and take him back.

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And that little 15 minute drive on the way back, like literally changed my life.

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My thinking, my vision of what was possible, just that

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association, you know what I mean?

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It's an association.

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They're either, they're, you know, I'm not going to my low little, a

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hundred thousand income at that time was not going to bring him down.

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He was going to pull me up and I actually, I wasn't even making

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a hundred thousand at that time.

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And I was living in a 600 square foot apartment, 60 grand in debt.

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And two months later I was making a quarter million and out of debt.

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So that was worth about 15 minutes driving all the way down there.

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I feel like we could talk forever.

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Unfortunately we'll have to wrap, but you do, you are working on a book and

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it was supposed to come out soon, but.

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Tell me a little bit about what's going on.

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So I'm happy and strong is my book.

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And I've been, I've been mentoring, a coaching as an entrepreneur,

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been working with ed for 22 years and, and in the financial industry.

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And I love it.

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And we've had a lot of success doing that, but I feel like the last like

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five years or so, what I've really been passionate about is helping.

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Coach the entrepreneurs to be successful in business.

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And especially like those couples, women, just entrepreneurs that are like

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striving to figure out how do you do this?

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You know, how do you do it all?

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It's like the number, number one question I get how to get, you know, be a mom and

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do all this philanthropy work that you do.

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And you know, the Stephan, Uganda, the charities and how do you do it all.

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And so I find that a lot of them are very frustrated or they're split.

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Is very frustrated of how long it's taking to get this thing off the ground.

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And, and, or they're not spending enough time with their kids.

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And so I was meeting with actually was with ed not too long ago at his home.

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And he said, Jamie, I want you to, I think, to think about doing this.

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And we, I created the happy and strong movement, meaning my idea of success is

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that, you know, yes, you achieve your wildest dreams and you have the money

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and your travel and the dream life.

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But when you get there, you're happy.

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You're strong that I've seen so many again, entrepreneurs that.

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Lost their business.

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Like they were wiped out.

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And so, because they weren't financially, they didn't have that

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strong foundation than fundamentals.

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And so, so I started doing the happy and strong workshops, which was teaching

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them and well, how do you have it all?

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How do you you know, have your faith, your fitness, your finance family, how

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do you balance it all as you teach them all the structure of it all and how to.

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To get the family stuff in.

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People always look at me like, well, you're, you know,

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you're, you're so involved.

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Like you said, if you're a family and as a mom and it's great to see.

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Yeah.

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So I did the happy and strong and then.

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If you, a few people had asked me to write books, I'm like,

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no, I'm focused on my business.

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I don't want any distractions.

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And so I just didn't want to, but then it just started nagging kind of

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at my heart, like that I needed to do this and kind of just the spirit

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telling me, like, you gotta do this.

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And so during COVID.

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Had a little bit more time.

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And my mom was in town and she could kind of help a little bit more with the kids.

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And so we wrote that we wrote the book and it was going to come

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out this fall, but I doing some things with John Maxwell right now.

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I love John.

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I love John.

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He's just, he's like the goat, you know?

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And and so we are going to do some things.

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He's endorsing the book and we're going to do some stuff.

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So it's launching.

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Amazing.

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And so I'm really excited about it.

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And it's, it really is a lot of how to have balance.

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Yeah, I know.

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There's like you said, there's no real balance.

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There's going to be times where something's going on in your family

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and you're going to be tipped this way.

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And then other times you're going for a big goal on your tip that way.

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But there is, instead of balance, you're striving for happy that you're fulfilled.

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You know, I think so many people.

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Busy and busy to them is chaos and stress and anxiety.

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I think that there's a difference of busy and fulfilled and loving your

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life.

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Yes.

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I completely agree.

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We will wrap up where can people find you online and yeah, we'll go.

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And then,

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yeah.

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Okay.

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Well I think the best place right now is on Instagram and I'm constantly posting.

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For women, for entrepreneurs of how to balance, how to do all

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these different things, how to grow your, and scale your business.

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So I think it's at Jamie dot Villalobos at Jamie dot Villalobos.

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Also on YouTube.

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There's some stuff on YouTube that they can find.

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Yeah.

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And then from there, the happy and strong website will be coming with

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the, with the information more about the book and teaser stuff there.

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Thank you so much for your time.

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I know I already know the audience got value, so if you did make sure

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you send Jamie a DM follow up.

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And just be on the look out for the fuck.

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Thanks again.

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Thank you.

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All right, everyone.

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If you're not inspired by Jamie or her story, then it's probably

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time to stop listening because that's the type of person I'm going

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to have on my podcast, always.

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Okay.

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I'm a huge, huge, huge fan.

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And I'm very, very, very excited for the delay in her book because

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of who she's doing it with now.

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So that is something we'll be on the lookout for.

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But look get in touch with her, follow her on Instagram.

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And speaking of Instagram, if you're listening to the podcast, if you are

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enjoying the podcast, take a screenshot and tag me on Instagram at rich Cardona.

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Underscore.

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If you're not following me, then follow me as well.

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I want to know who you are.

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I want to talk to you.

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You can always email info at rich Cardona, media.com.

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If you want to set up time to chat, I would love to get to

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know my listeners a lot better.

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That's something I'm going to be feverously working.

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And then lastly, leave a review, leave a review.

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If you've invested this much time in me, another 60 seconds is not going to

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matter if you've enjoyed it thoroughly than a five star, you would be awesome.

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And then you can just leave a few sentences that has some substance

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that's going to encourage other people that they probably should

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continue listening to this show.

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If they're a first time.

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I want to thank you deeply deeply for being one of the biggest drivers

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and continuing this podcast and getting the people that I'm able to.

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And that driver is to serve.

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I came from a life of service after 17 years in the Marine Corps, and

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it is my desire to continue to do so by helping you and interviewing

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industry experts and influencers.

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And that's what I'm going to keep doing as long as humanly possible.

3 comments

  1. That was so good! For myself, my wife, female and male friends, and any person that someone else depends on, Jaime Villalovos is a MUST LEARN from! She has a worldly view of what kind of mindset would it take to make life more fulfilling and raises the bar on personal development. Thank you Rich Cardona for interviewing Jaime, SO GOOD!

  2. Wow!!!! This is a great interview of a woman winning in all phases of her life. So glad to see that it’s possible because some of us get stuck in a career and think that we have to choose. Started from the bottom, now she’s here!!! Keep pushing Jaime!!! 👏 👏 👏 👏

  3. Loved this interview! Jaime is my mentor and still learned a couple of things by listening today! Great to hear there will be more interviews like this one!

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