Rich Cardona Media

158. How to Build a Network in a New Industry with Travis Chappell

August 11, 2021 no comments

Article featured image:158. How to Build a Network in a New Industry with Travis Chappell

“There is true freedom when you’re truly committed to something, because there’s no decisions to be made.” – Travis Chappell

On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with Guestio creator and founder Travis Chappell about networking and podcasting. Listen in as Rich and Travis discuss dealing with rejection, the power of confidence, and why there is freedom I commitment.

Travis Chappell is a direct sales consultant, real estate investor, and professional connector. He is the creator and host of Build Your Network, a top-rated business podcast dedicated to helping entrepreneurs cultivate genuine relationships, grow their inner circle, and leverage a powerful network the right way. He is also the creator and founder of Guestio, an app that allows podcast hosts and guests to connect with each other.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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  • 00:08 – Introduction
  • 07:03 – Travis’ history in sales
  • 08:27 – Dealing with rejection
  • 10:44 – Travis’ experience growing up in a closed religious community
  • 12:54 – Travis’ networking podcast
  • 14:01 – Self-awareness and success
  • 20:23 – The benefits of podcasting
  • 21:22 – Patience and podcasting
  • 26:30 – Why there is freedom in commitment
  • 28:30 – The power of confidence
  • 30:26 – Networking and podcasting
  • 34:18Guestio
  • 38:19 – Where to find Travis online
  • 38:51 – Rich’s closing thoughts

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How to connect with Travis:

Website

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

Spotify

Apple Podcasts

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

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Rocket Station

brooks@rocketstation.com

Transcript
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Welcome back to The Leadership Locker or, or, or if you are here or the

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first time you're in the right place.

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If you're an aspiring entrepreneur, a new entrepreneur, if you are a

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veteran entrepreneur and I mean, veteran as in entrepreneurial space or

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a veteran, someone like me who said.

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It's been a career in the military and are now looking into, or in

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the middle of that small business.

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I hope you're doing well.

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I hope you're thriving, but today's conversation is

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really, really interesting.

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And I didn't know it was going to go this way.

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And it was.

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30 minutes to do it.

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I did it in 29 minutes and 57 seconds.

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It was baller in my opinion, but it's with Travis Chappell and there's no irony in

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Nat because there is it's it's because you are going to hear his upbringing

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now really quick on, on Travis he's Castro, who's approaching 700 episodes.

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He is part of this very.

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Selective and exclusive $100 million mastermind ran by Dan and Joel

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Marianne, if you don't know them, it'd be probably a good idea to look them up.

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But they, they have their hands in so many different things.

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And, and, and the reason I even mentioned that is because you don't get into that.

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Unless you're doing something special and you can't afford to get into

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it unless you're doing something special, in my opinion, as well.

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And more importantly, he's the founder of the guest DEO app,

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which he will talk about now.

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I thought we were going to talk about it a lot, but we got into to a lot of different

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aspects before we could even get to that.

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And the aspects that I feel like.

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Going to be really, really important for you to listen to our, you know, just how

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our upbringing influences not only, only our decision-making and our work ethic,

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some of our entrepreneurial skillsets.

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And I'll just give you an example, not of his, but a mine.

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And that was look, I was a first generation American.

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Yeah.

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I didn't have played clothes.

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All I knew was that I needed to start working and working early

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on in my life and my sister and I both worked under the table.

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I had my first job when I was 12.

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And at that point I was responsible for getting my own

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clothes and things like that.

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I worked at an apple orchard.

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I was always the youngest kid in my grade, by the way, just because of

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one of my birthday sits in September.

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So did that for a couple of years.

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Then I was in high school.

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I think sophomore year I started working at a deli and then junior and senior

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year, I worked in a coffee shop in hospital that my entire family worked at.

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And I may have mentioned this before.

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I'm just letting you know, both sets of my grandparents worked.

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They're both immigrants.

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My parents worked there, immigrants.

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My sister worked there first gen American.

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And she worked in radiology and I worked at the coffee shop.

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And why I'm mentioning this is I was always customer facing

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all of those jobs, actually.

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No, I wasn't at the deli.

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I was responsible for taking out all the fat and throwing it in the dumpster.

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It was disgusting, but at the.

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Orchard and the store at the orchard and the hospital cafe, I was service-oriented.

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I was you know, waiting on tables, working the register, those types of things.

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And I would deal with people from all different backgrounds, people

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with different upbringings, people, different religions, people with

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different, you know, sexuality.

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People with different everything.

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More importantly, I was dealing with people who are in various emotional

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states, you know, happiness from having a baby girl, you know, maybe relief that

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maybe someone got some test results back.

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And they were a couple hours from being discharged and they

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needed another cup of coffee.

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Maybe it was someone who got bad news.

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Maybe it was someone who had a cousin that passed away.

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I'll never forget this time.

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I was trying to.

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Really up upbeat and charismatic with a gentleman I was waiting on

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and he, he ultimately just said like, look, man, like, I think he said,

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my cousin is dying or going to die.

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Like I'm not in the mood.

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And then Jersey people say shit like that all the time

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people get right to the point.

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Now that experience certainly plays a part in the way I interact

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with people on a general basis.

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And I believe it fast-forwarded the way I'm able to communicate

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the way I'm able to receive.

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And it doesn't mean I don't have my own drawbacks and all these other things,

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but I would say there's a certain amount of emotional intelligence that

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was built fundamentally back then.

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Even though I didn't realize it or I couldn't acknowledge it, but it, it,

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it was kind of inherently happening.

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Travis is going to talk about his upbringing.

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He's going to talk about an element of seclusion, so to speak.

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And then when he and his wife made a decision to kind of live a little bit of

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a different lifestyle, he leaned on some of that upbringing that I think to many of

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us would be like, you would imagine that he would probably be at a disadvantage,

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but it was actually advantageous.

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Fantastic sales career.

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And then like many of us, he decided I'm, I don't want to do this anymore,

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whatever this is for you, or just the time has come for that thing to be over.

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And when that happens and you want to start a business or you.

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Boss or you don't want to work for anyone or whatever it is

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then that's when it all begins.

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When you actually take action against that, right?

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Like when you don't want to do something and you're like, well, now I'm going

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to put myself in a position where I am completely relying on myself.

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So you'll hear him talk about that.

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You'll hear him talk about you know, the confidence and

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the lessons and the mindset.

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And obviously the most important part is building a network.

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The also the name of his podcast build your network.

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This is huge.

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This is huge.

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And it was, it was so timely because we were at a podcasting

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conference and networking is an intrinsic part of these experiences.

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Is it not?

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So.

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We ended up talking about that at length.

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Of course.

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And then we talked about a couple of other things, but Travis was phenomenal,

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super laid back, amazing guy responsive.

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And like many of the people I'm actually able to meet in person

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just humble, really humble.

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So there's that.

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And.

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Also got to meet mark Cuban briefly.

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I got to meet one of my past guests, Mike Kim whose book is out

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and it's called you are the brand.

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So I just felt like I should mention that because it's actually

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now a wall street bestseller.

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So that's awesome for him.

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I love when I have a podcast guest on that eventually hit some sort of milestone.

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So I got to meet him in person, which was always cool.

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And yeah, it was just a fantastic time.

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So I.

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But that's, that's where I was.

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That's where we executed this podcast and look, stay tuned for the mineral.

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I want to tell you about a special discount code.

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You could apply to a company that is sponsoring this episode,

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which is rocket station.

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And I'll tell you about it.

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Once we're about halfway through.

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Let's get it going.

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So you just got the awesome

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intro and

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I don't like to dig too much into backgrounds, Travis, but you started

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off in sales and we'll get into the podcast and everything else.

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But tell me about sales and do you, or did you.

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That's a loaded question.

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I enjoyed the learning process and I enjoyed the paychecks is really the answer

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to the question, because at the time I was in college to be a full-time Christian

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minister, essentially like a youth path.

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So while I was in college, I was making double like more than double what I was

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planning on making after I got my degree.

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And so I, I enjoyed the paychecks.

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It's really the, is really the real answer to the question.

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And it just became like, when I realized I didn't really want to

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be in ministry after I graduated.

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Now I have a useless Bible degree, doesn't really help me get a job anywhere.

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And you know, the, at that point it was like, well, what am I gonna do?

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Am I gonna just go sit on a desk and make 28 K a year and work my

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way up some corporate ladder and hope that in 10 years I can make

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70 grand or something like that.

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Just do 100% commission sales and work when I want and just

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crush it and make some money.

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You know what I mean?

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So I did enjoy, I did enjoy that aspect.

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A hundred percent commission thing.

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I enjoyed being able to kind of work when I wanted to.

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I didn't like people telling me what to do.

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I still don't obviously.

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And so I just kinda liked working on my own schedule, doing my own

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thing and sales set me up a lot, I think for, for everything else.

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That

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was literally going to be my followup.

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A lot of the entrepreneurs that we know a lot of them always say you should have

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had a sales job, just to understand, to feel the rejection, to understand the

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rejection, to develop the thick skin.

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How was that for you developing the kind of thick skin and getting rejection?

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I mean like literally your paycheck depended on it.

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Yeah.

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Did you find yourself ever trying to take shortcuts or you're like,

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no, I just got to get better.

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Yeah.

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I mean, that's the bottom line, man.

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She's got to go hit the doors.

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You know, the one thing I miss about doing door to door was the simplicity.

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Yeah.

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Well right now running a software company.

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Sometimes you don't know which lever to be pulling on.

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You know what I mean?

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You have operations and you have sales and you have marketing and you have hiring

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and you have all these different things and you gotta like, kind of be playing

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with all the leverage all the time.

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And others always balance.

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You have to put work here, put work there with door to door managers.

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If I'm in a funk, the answer, the solution is go knock on more doors.

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You know, it is just super simple, which I, I, I kinda

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miss that simplicity those days.

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You know what I mean?

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It was just, I go out, I sell, I come home, you know what I mean?

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It's super easy.

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Well, not easy but simple.

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And so the rejection part, man, a lot of people ask you know, about how I did that.

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And I don't really remember it being something that was

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like insurmountable to me.

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I think that I.

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Like I said, I, I enjoyed competition.

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Yeah.

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I was always, I always played a bunch of sports growing up and I I'm a competitor.

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I don't like to lose and door to door brought that part out of me.

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And so, especially because when I first joined, I was in college.

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And so a lot of my friends were working at the same place that I was working.

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And so I just wanted to beat everybody, you know what I mean?

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And so I would just put more hours in on the doors or I would do some more

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training when everybody wouldn't do it, because I just wanted to know.

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And then in this case, you know, in sports, growing up winning is great,

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but it doesn't result in money.

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You know what I mean?

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And now I'm playing this game of sales and it's like, oh, I win.

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And I get to feel good because I won.

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But also I got a fat paycheck from it too.

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You know what I mean?

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So it was like a discovering a new thing.

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And so the, the rejection to me.

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You know, I think it gets to you after a while, which is why I, like, I saw

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the writing on the wall after like my third or fourth year doing it.

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And I was like, I don't want to do this.

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And when I'm like 35, so I need to pivot now with I'm going to, you know, end

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up in a different destination later on.

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So I just kinda got out of it.

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And when I, when I felt like I was, you know, done, I like to like

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unraveled as the podcast goes.

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And this is my first thought, is that a lot of people in college who

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weren't doing what you were doing were doing what normal college people do.

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Just working enough to drink, you know, or working enough to go parties,

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hanging out, sleeping late missing classes and all these other things.

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And it seemed like you were like, no, like there's some sort of

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responsibility or lifestyle I could.

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Better.

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And you were thinking ahead.

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So it seems like that's going to be a pattern that evolves.

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You have to go into it and to be fair like for me at that time in my life, I

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grew up like the, the, the religion that I grew up in was very, I never call it

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a cult because I think that disrespects people, like my buddy has like literally

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27 brothers and sisters and three moms.

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And then he was in a actual cult.

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You know what I mean?

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So.

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This is the call I got for him.

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If I call what I grew up in Nicole, but yeah, it's very, very, very similar, like

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a small, tight knit religious bubble is the way what's the, what is it called?

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The religion?

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Yeah.

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Independent financial Baptist is what we were so like, we didn't

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even associate with other Baptists.

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Like Southern Baptist were too liberal for us.

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We were, you know, over here, further on the right from Southern Baptist.

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Yeah.

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So when I was coming out of all of that, you know what I mean?

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Like, I, I was conditioned to think a certain way about life.

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And so I didn't, I, there was never the, like, it wasn't even a question in my mind

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about what I was going to do this weekend.

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Like, should I go drink or should I go work?

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Like we literally, I never, like, I didn't drink alcohol

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until I was in my mid twenties.

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I didn't like do any of the other party stuff I graduated.

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So I finished a semester early in college.

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I got married the next month.

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And then walked and graduated.

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Got my diploma in may, like five months later.

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And then moved to Fresno, started my first job and bought a house right after that.

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So like I was 21 married with a mortgage, you know, so there wasn't really

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any, like, that was what I was doing.

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My 21st birthday is like having a wife and like paying bills.

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You know what I mean?

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So there wasn't like a lot of room.

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Doing what I wanted to do, or just kind of messing around or partying or whatever.

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Like I was always focused on, on what I had going on.

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Life is a lot better

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without distractions.

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So I, when you have your eye on the prize or eyes on the prize, like,

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it just obviously seems better.

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So then obviously, you know, I saw some of your history and you were working and you

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moved up, but at some point a podcast came along and it's called build your network.

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And I'm like, why did you come up with that?

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Did you notice?

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Wow, I have awesome networking abilities.

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It's time

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to share.

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Or opposite of that.

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It was like, I need to build my own network and I don't know how to do that.

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So yeah, no, that is legitimate.

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That's what it was because I was at that point where I had the first full-time

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year that I was in door to door and my number one goal was make six figures.

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And I was like 22 or 23 at the time.

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And I hit six figures and it was one of those like weird moments in

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life because it was counterintuitive to what I thought would happen.

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And what most people would think would happen.

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Like if you're 23 and you're making six figures in 20 hour work weeks,

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you know, you'd think it'd be like stoked on continuing to do that.

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But like I said, I just kind of saw the writing on the wall was already bumping

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up against the ceiling of where I was.

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And at, you know, it scared me at 23 to already be kind of

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like bumping up against that.

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I knew that I had more in me and I could probably do more with a few

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more years, but I was like, if I do this for another 10 years, I'm not

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going to see exponential results.

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I'm only going to see.

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Results.

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And that's scary prospect to me as a 23 year old.

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Let me interrupt

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for a second.

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Why is it so hard for people to think that far ahead and kind of have that

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self-awareness like, you know, there's someone who's 33 who would be completely

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happy with what you were doing at 23 and be like, dude, I'm halfway home.

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Yeah.

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But like, why do you

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think people are that way, dude?

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That's good question, man.

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I spent a lot of time trying to think about those things because

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you know, I have kids now, you know?

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Yeah.

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Two little kids.

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And so I'm always trying to think of like, how can I, how can I help them

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have that drive and have that ambition and have that motivation to go out and

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like do things and, and think that way.

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And I, I'm not a hundred percent sure where it came from.

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I think probably my, my parents, there was a lot of delayed gratification growing up.

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My, my parents were extremely strict.

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With, with the money that they made and, and made smart financial decisions.

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And so that probably is where some of that came from.

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But I was always a future thinker.

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I don't know.

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I don't know where I really got that from, but it was always just kind of like, yeah,

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this is cool and all, but like, I want to be 33 doing this, you know what I mean?

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I don't wanna be 43 doing this.

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And so I would look around at the people around me that have been doing it for

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a lot longer than me, and look at the way that they were living their lives.

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And I was.

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This guy's like like I love this guy, but he's like 48 knocking doors.

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Like still going out, drinking, partying on the weekends and like,

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you know, on his third wife and I was.

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Dude.

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I love you, but I don't want to end up there, you know?

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And it scared me enough to be, yeah, just like I quit cold Turkey because

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the thing is in door to door, a hundred percent commission door to door sales,

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you can't half ass it and show up to work and still collect the paycheck.

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You know what I mean?

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Like, you know, like a lot of people can just kind of keep doing their job

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while they figure out their side hustle, just like show up to their cubicle,

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input their data, grab their paycheck and they're there and they're gone.

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But for me, it was like, I can't half-ass this, if, if I don't want

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to do it anymore, I'm not going to do it because like, I, I'm going

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to waste my time on be frustrated.

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I'm not going to make money.

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I'm not going to close deals.

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And so I just, I quit cold Turkey man, which was just like, I gotta

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do something else like that.

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Just, I didn't know what I was doing, but at that point, you

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know, so six months, eight months.

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First time in my life that I, that I, that I looked to outside sources for knowledge.

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And I started reading and I started, which was a huge thing for me.

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Like my family was so surprised because I was always the kid that hated reading.

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Like they tried to get me to read all the time and I was always

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like, no, no, no, I hate it.

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I hate it.

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And so I started reading books and listening to audio books and, you

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know, watch some YouTube videos.

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And the first time I ever got into listening to podcasts and and so I

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listened to a few podcasts, thought this would be a really cool idea.

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I don't know what to talk about.

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Let's do sales looked up sales in iTunes, and there was like 30,000

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podcasts talking about sales.

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And I was like, all right, well, I don't know much about this world,

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but I know that I shouldn't do that because it's too saturated and I'm

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not gonna be able to stand out as a 24 year old kid with no credibility.

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So what else can I talk about?

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And so the, the one thing that I thought was why did I think that I

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was pretty good at sale at sales?

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Like why did I think that I made six figures selling door to door at 23?

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And the answer to me was I got around people who were way

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better than me at doing it.

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And I learned how they did it and I reverse engineered it and

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I applied it and put the work in.

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And that to me seemed like a really good path to learn or do anything that you

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want to do is go get around the people who are doing it at the highest possible

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level and learn directly from them.

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And your ex your results are always going to be accelerated and exponential.

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Just trying to figure it out on your own.

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And so that's where the idea of build your network came from.

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It was just like, oh, I'll do a show on networking then.

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And so I looked it up, I thought it was going to be super saturated,

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like sales cause everybody talks about networking and it was nothing.

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Man is crickets.

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There was, there was no show out there that was specifically like, everybody

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talks about it in an episode, but specifically talking about networking,

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there was no show that existed.

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And I was like, all right, cool.

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That seems like a blue ocean.

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Start the show, build your network really, as a way for me to build my own

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network, I was starting from scratch, man.

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When I left that religious bubble, I grew up in, you know, like a lot of people have

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like, oh my friend from college, you know, his dad is this VP of blah, blah, blah.

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And it was just like, Grew up in this small Baptist community.

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So when I left that my entire network existed there, cause I went there

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from the time that I was like, we went to the church from the time that

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I was three until the time I was 22.

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And then they had a school on the campus of the church that was closed enrollment.

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Like it was not like nobody from nobody that was not a

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paying member of the church.

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Nobody like outside of that could join the school.

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And so I went to that school from kindergarten all the way through

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12th grade, and I went to college on the same campus as well.

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So literally bro, like from kindergarten through senior year of college,

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almost seven days a week, I was there cause we had church on Sunday.

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We had soul-winning Saturday and I had school Monday to Friday.

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So, you know, coming out of all of that, I didn't, I didn't know anybody.

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I didn't have a network because they were all over there.

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You know what I mean?

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If I want to do this thing and I want to be successful in life.

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Like I got to go find some people, man.

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I gotta go see like how people are doing stuff and, and learn from them.

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And so it was very much a kind of a, almost like a selfish message

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for myself where I was like, I gotta learn how to do this because I need

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to surround myself with better people.

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If I'm the average of the five people that I spend the most time with and I need to

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go boost my average man, because yeah,

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that's crazy.

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Cause like to someone from outside looking in, I'd be like, well, this

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dude's clearly in over his head.

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Like if he was in that kind of bubble for that long.

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He doesn't even know it's like going to Vegas for the first time.

Speaker:

You're like, what is happening?

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Right.

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So it's like the whole, it's like a whole new world.

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So for you.

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I would imagine that it would have been a challenge, but it

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seems like you were after it.

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And now you're almost here at 700 episodes.

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Talk to me about your podcast journey.

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And it was a challenge, you know, it definitely was a challenge,

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mostly because we were really coming out of that world and changing

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belief, structures and systems.

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And we were doing that as a married couple, my wife and I, you know,

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cause she grew up the same way I did.

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And we, we, you know, started dating our senior of high school.

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And so, you know, that was a very challenging time.

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In those regards, you know, sometimes I look back on and I was like, I wonder how

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I got anything done because we were in such like just kind of con like confused

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states about like our own morals and values and hierarchies in life, you know?

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And so to get anything done in that state, And I don't know how,

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even how I compartmentalized it back then, but got it done somehow.

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And, and and just kept kind of pushing forward.

Speaker:ah, man podcasting started in:Speaker:

So who were here at podcast movement right now and it's August, I launched

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my show like two weeks after.

Speaker:Podcast movement:Speaker:

So it was literally, probably probably this week will be four years.

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Exactly.

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That I, that I launched my show.

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And then we're coming up on 700 episodes now and been able to

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interview some of my personal heroes.

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Really.

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Yeah.

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And I can't wait

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to talk about it.

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And what that led to, obviously there's a pain point that you identified

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and then that led to what you're doing, what you're pushing on now.

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For the podcast.

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I have the same approach.

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I like to interview people who inspire me.

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I've been following you for awhile.

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And then like the Gary visa, Jocko's all those people.

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I'm like, I just want to get in front of them.

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And I'm going to figure out a way how, because I want to purge

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some of that knowledge, not only for me which do you understand?

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Of course, like we're learning dude.

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Like that saves me reading a book,

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the reason to do a podcast.

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I tell people all the time, it's my number one, education accountability partner.

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Because like I'm always talking to people, having good conversations.

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Asking the questions that I want to know the answer to it's literally like

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free mentorship and coaching session.

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Yeah.

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You know what I mean?

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Like, yes.

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So yeah, I mean, it's been an accelerated learning curve and you feel like you

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owe it to your audience, which if you're a semblance of a good host

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at all, you should feel that way.

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You should feel like you need to give your audience the

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best content you possibly can.

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So I'm always reading the top industry books and listening to the top audio

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books and listening to podcasts, like trying to perfect, you know, our ability

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to bring value to our listeners and.

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So that's really et cetera.

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So like accelerated learning for, for me.

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So you're looking back and it's 700 episodes.

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Podcasting is tough.

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It can be very simple and it can be very easy, both, but there's a lot of times

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where plenty of people I know even myself were just like, dude, I don't know, like

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this, this is just getting too much.

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Did you ever have those and talk to me

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about them?

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Yeah, definitely.

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Because at the beginning, man, nobody, nobody listened.

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You know what I mean?

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Like that was.

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We probably 18 months before we started seeing like some decent traction and

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18 months of three interviews a week that I was doing at the time and three

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interviews a week is a lot of work.

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You know, when you don't have a network, this is like, you have to go find people

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and then pitch them and then book them and then interview them at three per week for

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that entire period of time without making money, it was just like, what am I doing?

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Because I know I could go out with sales and I can make a lot

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of money if I spend this time.

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Selling stuff.

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But but from the beginning it was basically just a long-term commitment.

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I knew that going into it, it was going to be like, look, I'm going

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to give this a minimum of two years.

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And at that, at that at the end of two years of nothing comes from it.

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If I don't make any money and I haven't learned anything

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or I haven't met new people.

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It just wasn't worth my time.

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Then at two years, I'll reconsider what I'm going to do next.

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I'll either can keep it going, stop it, do something different, but I'm

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gonna give it a minimum of two years.

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And I think that everybody, everybody that I coach anybody that I teach, I

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tell them the same thing you have to commit because there's going to be a,

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so many times where, where it doesn't make any logical sense to keep it.

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You know what I mean?

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And but the, the only people that end up getting really big in this

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space are the people who pushed through those times and do it anyway.

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And so that, that was what it was for me.

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It was two years consistent quality content, and then I'll do

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some reconsideration after that.

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If it doesn't go well,

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All right.

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I'm going to read a list of things to you that my lead VA

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or my obsolete texted me today.

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I didn't want to check slack because I was about to have a

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really important conversation with a prospect and I go, Hey, can you just

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text me everything that took place?

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And I have no idea where I just put my phone.

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But it was one of the longest texts I've ever received.

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And there was a couple of hours left in the shift and it varied,

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it varied from executing payroll.

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It was sending invoices, invoice reminders to a couple of people that

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are delinquent in their invoices.

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It was content planning for next week.

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It was assignments that I needed that she put as tasks

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for me that I needed to execute.

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There were some podcasting things that she took care of.

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So, you know we've covered accounting already.

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We've covered payroll already.

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We've covered client-based work.

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So there's that.

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And then she told me about a couple of emails and DMS received from people

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that I met at podcast movement that are interested in doing some work.

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Then she talked about what was the other thing?

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Oh, she talked about some of the screening for some of the new hires.

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That are coming on board or the two finalists.

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She screened them and then she set up the meetings for them

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that I'm going to have next week.

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Oh.

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And then she sent me all her notes from a couple courses.

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I asked her to take from Dennis Yu from blitz metrics who was a,

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I guess, I guess not long ago.

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So that was some of it.

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And that's just off memory.

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If I had it in front of me, like I'd still be reading.

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So what does that tell you?

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That's all shit I don't need to do.

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That's all shit.

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I delegate.

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Those are all things that I was unable to do, and that would not benefit me.

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You know, she is a conduit and the others that are coming on board are going to

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be conduits to just getting more done.

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And the more that gets done, the more I'm able to focus on what I need to focus.

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And that's building the business every week.

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You can't be down in, in, you need to be up and out.

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And that is exactly.

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Oh, and yeah, our newest clients on the podcast production side,

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she made some graphics for them and send them some graphics.

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And she also was in touch with the podcast team and realized that one

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episode needs to be rerecorded because someone's Mike wasn't on in one.

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These are all things she's doing the job of a million people and

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she's doing it in a phenomenal.

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Okay.

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All that is just to tell you that I got her from rocket station.

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Okay.

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So rocket station.com.

Speaker:

If you want to set an appointment to learn more, go to landing dot

Speaker:

rocket station.com, or you can emailBrooks@rocketstation.com and tell

Speaker:

them you've listened to the leadership locker that, you know, rich Cardona

Speaker:

that you've heard about them from me.

Speaker:

And they will go from there.

Speaker:

If you mentioned that they're going to give you 25% off your process mapping,

Speaker:

which is before you even get your candidates that you're going to interview.

Speaker:

They are going to map out the processes that you're going to need them to execute.

Speaker:

They're going to do that for you.

Speaker:

They're going to, you're going to talk through it.

Speaker:

They're going to document it.

Speaker:

They're going to present it to you.

Speaker:

And then you're going to say if anything changed or if it's good to go.

Speaker:

So 25% off that mentioned the leadership lab.

Speaker:

Look, if there's anything, I just said that appeals to you.

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Okay.

Speaker:

At a very, very affordable rate.

Speaker:

Full-time part-time your hours, wherever you are your hours,

Speaker:

then you need to reach out.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

That was long as hell.

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But I just want you to know, I want you to get a feel for it.

Speaker:

Let's get back to the show.

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One of 'em someone that used to work with our company said to me is like our first.

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And she's like, there's nothing non-negotiable to you.

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Like everything's negotiable.

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And this was a you know, a weakness in the beginning entrepreneurs.

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I mean, like we, Ida we think we see shiny objects and I was like,

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okay, year two is a different story.

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Niching down, focusing on certain specific things.

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And like that kind of thing.

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That, what you just mentioned, if you're listening is incredibly important.

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If you say to yourself, like it's non-negotiable for the next two

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years, no matter what happens, that's literally those moments.

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You think you're going to have a breakdown that breakthrough happens.

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So obviously the two years worked out and then you started getting

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ridiculous guests and there's freedom and commitment, which

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is totally counterintuitive.

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You know what I mean?

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Like commitment sounds like the opposite of freedom, but there is true freedom

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when you're truly committed to something because there's no decisions to be made.

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You know what I mean?

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Like people burn out because they try to make, they make too many decisions.

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Every day is a decision of, should I quit or should I keep going?

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And then.

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You know, after a while their will gives out on them and they're

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like, you know what F it I'm done.

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I quit.

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If you commit fully, the option to quit is not on the table.

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The only option is move forward.

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And which makes you have to be resourceful because if I want to move forward

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and be successful and what I'm doing currently, isn't working, then I like

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the only option is to keep going and figure something else out because I

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already took the quit option already.

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Like I know that that's not possible for me for two more years.

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And so you gotta make that commitment.

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You gotta keep that coming.

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People's biggest mistake.

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I think in life is they make too many commitments to

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themselves that they don't keep.

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And they have a horrible reputation with themselves.

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They don't like themselves when they look themselves in the mirror

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and they can't figure out why.

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And it's because they don't even trust themselves, you know?

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And then it comes across in their sales.

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It comes across in their marketing people.

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Don't like to do business with them because they can't

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quite put their finger on it.

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But it's because that person is portraying a version of

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themselves that they don't even.

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And they don't even trust.

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How are you going to spec somebody else to know, like, and trust you

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if you don't even like, and trust yourself, you know what I mean?

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And so that energy is tangible, man.

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Like you're you're so, and I'm telling you from personal experience and

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maybe you've been there too, where you're just like this isn't me.

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And then all of a sudden, when the switch flips, it's it becomes

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easy and you're just like leaks into your confidence, man.

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Like confidence is built on your reputation with yourself.

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Like how much do, like, what opinion do you hold?

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Yeah.

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You have to have an impeccable relationship with yourself.

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If you're going to exude confidence in a way that doesn't come across

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as arrogance to people, you know, confidence is just being yourself.

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Strongly and not really, you know, caring about what other

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people think about you context.

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And that's the reason that I can go through rejection.

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Like you take any person that goes through rejection a lot, and I

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promise you, they have a strong relationship with themselves.

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Oh, you can get through that much rejection, like rejection pains.

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You, because it's a confirmation of your own inner thoughts

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about who you perceive yourself.

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You know what I'm saying?

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Like, if you know that that's not true, that like, oh, you know

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what, I'm not a piece of shit know, like, I I'm good at what I do.

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And and when I make commitments, I see them through and I give it my all.

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And you carry that confidence with you when somebody rejects you, it's

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like, yeah, that hurt a little bit.

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But like, I'm gonna find someone else.

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Yep.

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Because like, I know this is going to work, you know what I mean?

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But if you always have these enters, these self doubts and all these,

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these, this inner talking to yourself and this language that people use

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for themselves, it's incredible.

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The way that we allow ourselves to talk to us.

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If anybody in our lives talked to us the way that we sometimes talk to ourselves,

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they wouldn't be our friends anymore.

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A hundred percent.

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I mean, but for some reason we just let ourselves like beat ourselves up

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all the time and then expect it to not affect the way that we live our life.

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And it's like, you can't talk to yourself like that.

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You don't allow yourself to say things to yourself that you wouldn't allow your

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best friends to say to you, you know, Yeah, going to continue to be poison

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in your confidence, which is going to leak into the ability to overcome

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rejection, your ability to move on to the, you know, from a setback and have

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a comeback and your ability to like keep pushing forward, you know, so

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that confidence plays a key role now.

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So you

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establish obviously a great deal of confidence, podcasting, you had

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massive guests and that goes into what a lot of entrepreneurs deal with.

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And we'll kind of obviously keep it podcast specific cause of where we are.

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The big ask and the big ask for a lot of people, especially who do this, is

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like, I want to reach out to mark Cuban.

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I want to reach out to the rock or whoever.

Speaker:

And you realize that's a pain point, but because you were able to build

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a network, it wasn't necessarily as challenging for you and you

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wanted to make it easier for people.

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How did you do that?

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And what do we got?

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Yeah, man.

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So we basically started to, you know, when I started the podcast, my number

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one goal became I want to create the best quality content that I could.

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I wrote a quote from Steve Martin on my whiteboard.

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I had it there for like six months and it was be so good.

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They can't ignore you.

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And it's such a simple concept, you know what I mean?

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But he really embodied that and I was like, that's so true.

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That's so true.

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If I go interview Barack Obama tomorrow.

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People are going to pay attention.

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That'd be like, Hey, I don't know who this Travis kid is, but this is

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a good interview with Barack Obama.

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You know what I mean?

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Like, there's a, there's a certain point that, you know, the quality that you're

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putting out is going to demand that people pay attention to what you're doing.

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And so I was like, I don't know how to do that because I'm a 24

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year old door to door sales guy.

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Like I don't, I'm not a podcast or I don't know how to do this.

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So I just interviewed and you know, then that was really my, my, my thing.

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Yeah.

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I just kept reaching up to more and more people again, taking that

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rejection and thick skin, you know, mattered a lot when I was doing that.

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Cause at the beginning I got rejected a lot.

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I got ignored a lot and this time it wasn't just Joe Schmoe around

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the corner, who is a piece of crap that I didn't care was telling me

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to F off and get off his porch.

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You know what I mean?

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Like it wasn't that guy, it was a guy that I looked up to respect

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and thought highly of, and they were rejecting me and ignoring me.

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And it was like that hurt a little bit more.

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You know what I mean?

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That takes digs into your confidence a little bit more than some rando around.

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So I started reaching out to hire higher quality guests.

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And then that became the question that most people started asking me.

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It was like, Hey, you just started.

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How did you.

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The grant Cardone how'd you get, you know, Tilman, Fertitta,

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how'd you get John Maxwell.

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How did you get these people to say yes to interviews on your show?

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We would put out some trainings and stuff, but the end of the day,

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the answer is it takes months of persistence, reach out backdoor,

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entrances introductions here, conference here, mastermind, join this group.

Speaker:

Like there's a lot that goes into being able to get these

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types of people on your show.

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And and at the end of the day I kinda got lucky at the time.

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You know, I was still, when I started my podcast, I got back into

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door to door just to pay the bills.

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So I was just, I would sell one or two weeks every month, make enough money

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to like, do everything I wanted to do.

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Invest the money in my podcast.

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Still be able to pay our bills and everything.

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Hi, let me

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just say this man.

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I, this for the audience I'm literally potentially going to be.

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In a position to take a job that kind of was presented to me.

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I still have to interview for it, but like, they're like,

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Richard just really take this.

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And Heather here we were talking about it and I'm just kinda like,

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does that mean I'm a sellout?

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And then I kind of came to grips and like, dude, like that literally

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could fund the business and fund these podcasts trips that I do.

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And it's just like, it's not like it's actually a boss move.

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One of my friends said is because of your little.

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I followed it right into the business to make your business grow.

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I'm just saying for the audience, it's so good to hear that you did

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that because it didn't phase, you you're like, this is just what needs

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to be done.

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Right?

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Exactly.

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Exactly.

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And there's too much stigma, man.

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People, you can't, you can't care what those people think because

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a lot of times those people.

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Actual sellouts.

Speaker:

You know what I mean?

Speaker:

And they're just like, hoping that you were going to fail in

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your entrepreneurial journey.

Speaker:

Then when you go get a job, they're like, I knew it.

Speaker:

I knew that he couldn't do it on his own, you know?

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And it's like, all right, well, you're keeping, you're keeping track

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of time on too short of a schedule.

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You know what I mean?

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Talk to me in 10 years and we'll see what's up.

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You know what I'm saying?

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Like, it's, it's the longterm.

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And so that's the way you have to think.

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And, and you gotta do what you gotta do at the time.

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You know, I had a, I had a family at a mortgage to pay on bills to pay.

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I couldn't do.

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Do nothing, you know what I'm saying?

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And, and, and so I, I you know, made the money to be able to invest in masterminds

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and to be able to invest in my business.

Speaker:

And and then, and then at the same time was, was building up

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the podcast on the side of that.

Speaker:

So you had trainings and things like that.

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And I, I know.

Speaker:

I've been able to people I've got the same questions and it is a ton of work,

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but at some point you're like, I bet.

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And I'm just assuming a lot of people aren't going to

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do that.

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Right.

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Exactly.

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That's kind of what I was getting around to.

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It was like when I first started, I had the time because the only

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thing that I did with my podcast.

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Was research guests and interview guests that all of my time went

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to getting good guests on my show.

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So I had the luxury of doing that at that time.

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And I know a lot of people don't, they're starting a podcast.

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It's like they have three hours a week to do it.

Speaker:

It's not even just, they're not willing to put in the work.

Speaker:

It's like, I don't have time to do.

Speaker:

I can't reach out to that many guests like, Hey, how do I get in touch with

Speaker:

those people without I give people credit that it's not just laziness.

Speaker:

It's just like, it takes a ton of time.

Speaker:

So, what we wanted to do was build a tool that made it easier for people to do that.

Speaker:

And so that's kinda what we came up with guest EO the idea for it.

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And I was trying to, I was trying to use this other thing called cameo.

Speaker:

And at end of the day, it's just not what the platform is built for.

Speaker:

It's a great platform by, you know, a 32nd happy birthday from

Speaker:

whole Kogan for your dad or what.

Speaker:

But it's all, it's more novelty.

Speaker:

And so I was like, man, if this existed for me to be able to interview good

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quality people for my show, and I could pay him a thousand bucks instead of

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having to try to find the gatekeeper and wait six months for a response,

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and then go to this event that I know that they're going to be at to

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hopefully get a chance to shake them.

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You know what I'm saying?

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Like, instead of doing that, I can just pay a thousand

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bucks and I get them on now.

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Like, yes, please.

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You know what I mean?

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So so we got, we got to work building that plan.

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About a year ago did a soft launch six months ago, just been collecting,

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you know, feedback from users, making iterations to the platform.

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And so we're gonna do a more of a, more of a serious launch this fall.

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And and that's basically what I'm spending all my time on now.

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Yeah.

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And

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I know you, we talked yesterday very briefly.

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You're working towards kind of scaling back a little bit on the

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podcast thing, which, I mean, hello, anytime you approached anyone

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approached 700 episodes, like, fuck.

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Yeah, you're going to scale back, especially if you have this going on,

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but what has the response been from users or if it's in beta or whatever, and how

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happy are they.

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Yeah, it's been good, man.

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I can't, I can't complain.

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You know, I've, I've heard a lot of nightmare stories from people, developing

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products that people don't want and they spend $300,000 developing a product

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and realized people don't want it, or they're, or they've spent $300,000.

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And then our development team, you know, F set up and then it's

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like, oh, we're out of money now.

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And now we just have a jenky platform that doesn't really work.

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And it's just like, there were a lot of nightmare stories.

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Like I can't complain, man.

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We we've gotten, we've gotten some great user feedback.

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It was one of those things.

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The the lean startup was one of those books that like really changed

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my perspective on the whole thing.

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And gave me a little bit more patience because when we launched the first

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product, you think like, oh, by next month we're going to have 10,000 users.

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You know what I mean?

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And it's just like, oh wait, they don't like this feature.

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Right.

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Whoa, that sucks.

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Cause we spent like a lot of time and like 15 grand to building out that specific

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feature and now they don't want it.

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You know what I mean?

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So I was like, what do we do now?

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You know?

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So you'd just have to bring on users, ask them what they like, what they don't

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like, make iterations, make changes.

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Figure out what act, what people actually want before you, you know,

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bring in a ton of users in that process is going to take a long period of time.

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So that's kind of what we've been working through, but overall, the

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feedback has been really good.

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We have some great investors that have invested into our seed round that are

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on board, like, you know, John Lee Dumas and Matt Barnes you know, Josh know, Joel

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Marion, a lot of top notch investors.

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I just reached out to Matt

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Barnes.

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Awesome.

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So I'll try and summarize this in less than, yeah.

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Because we're a little bit in a crunch for time.

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I'm interested in having John Lee Dumas on the show.

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I'm going to go to your platform and I'm going to expedite the process by

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paying for it, which happens a lot.

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And as entrepreneurs grow and realize that it's easier to invest

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in accelerating the process.

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That's what I'm going to do.

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I'm going to have him on the show and it's just going to be a completely

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different hassle-free email list

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experience.

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You know what I mean?

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Like it's not like a, oh yeah.

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I have time talk to my assistant and we'll talk in seven months.

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You know what I mean?

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That's when I add time, it's like, no, you're, you're paying me and we'll get

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it done in two weeks and it'll be done.

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Where can people find you and we'll wrap up there?

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Yeah.

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Travis chappell.com.

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Probably a good place.

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Just to check out everything I got going on.

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All my socials and links, podcast stuff is all over at Travis, apple.com.

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We are in the middle of construction on the site right now.

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So there's probably some outdated things on there.

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If you go there really soon, but should be updated.

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And then on the app store, it's Castillo just if you're a, so Google users,

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you know, depending on what, when this episode comes out, should be able to

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get it here in the next few weeks.

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But it's immediately available for you.

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It was users right now.

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All right, man.

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Thank you so much for your time.

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Appreciate it, bro.

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Thanks for having me.

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Okay.

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Everyone, no matter where you listened the leadership locker thrives.

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You letting other people know that they should probably listen to it.

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Okay.

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Travis shared a lot of personal aspects that I think a lot of us can relate to in

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our own way about what has been able to thrust him forward in entrepreneurship.

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And I want other aspiring and new entrepreneurs to hear these things.

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So please.

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Imagine there's a toll booth.

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Imagine you can't listen to another episode unless you share it, share this

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with someone, read it and review it.

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This is how it grows.

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And I just literally came from a freaking podcast conference.

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Okay.

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No matter what I do anywhere on social, there's nothing more

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powerful than a recommendation.

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Think of.

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You don't just go browse Netflix, man.

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People tell you what you should be watching on Netflix

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and this word of mouth.

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It's the same thing.

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So if the leadership lockers giving you anything, please share it.

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Get the word out.

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I'm trying to take this thing to the moon.