Rich Cardona Media

155. How a Team of VAs Will Transform Your Business (And Give You Time Back) with Dennis Yu

August 4, 2021 no comments

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“The bigger your audience becomes, the more you have to delegate to other people.”Dennis Yu

On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with digital marketing and personal brand expert Dennis Yu about how outsourcing can help take your business to the next level. Listen in as Rich and Dennis discuss finding help overseas, task libraries, and apprenticeship. They also discuss delegating your social media, and Dennis’ Dollar-a-Day Facebook Ad strategy.

Dennis Yu is the Chief Technology Officer of BlitzMetrics, a digital marketing company which partners with schools to train young adults. He’s an internationally recognized lecturer in Facebook Marketing and has spoken in 17 countries, spanning 5 continents, including keynotes at L2E, Gultaggen, and Marketo Summit. Dennis has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, LA Times, National Public Radio, TechCrunch, Fox News, CBS Evening News and is co-author of Facebook Nation – a textbook taught in over 700 colleges and universities.

He’s a regular contributor for Adweek’s SocialTimes column and has published in Social Media Examiner, Social Media Club, Tweak Your Biz, B2C, Social Fresh, and Heyo. He held leadership positions at Yahoo! and American Airlines and studied Finance and Economics at Southern Methodist University as well as London School of Economics.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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  • 00:09 – Introduction
  • 04:20 – Outsourcing overseas
  • 08:59 – Dennis’ task library and checklists
  • 13:01 – Documenting your processes
  • 14:59 – Handing off minor tasks to a VA so that you can focus on the important stuff
  • 26:48 – The value of creating reusable social media content
  • 28:25 – Delegation and apprenticeship
  • 31:53 – Delegating your social media
  • 37:05 – Facebook ads
  • 51:54 – YouTube Shorts and other short-form content
  • 57:19 – Where to find Dennis online

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How to connect with Dennis:

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

Website

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

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Rocket Station

brooks@rocketstation.com

Transcript
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Welcome back to The Leadership Locker.

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It is your host Rich Cardona.

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You're in the right place.

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You are here in the right place.

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If you're a new entrepreneur, aspiring entrepreneur, if you're

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in the thick of it as a seasoned entrepreneur and you're encountering

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new problems, this is a place to be.

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If you want to hear about the journey from me or lessons, I've been learning

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currently in year two on Mondays and Fridays and on Wednesdays, I have experts

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like Dennis Yu, who is my guest today.

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Now Dennis is the CEO of blitz metrics, digital marketing company.

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They partner with schools to train young adults.

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He's a CTO chief technology officer at Cairo revenue, digital marketing

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company that helps contractors with their online marketing efforts.

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Obviously very niche, just 50,000 chiropractors in the U S so he's kind of

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got that shit cornered, you know, and.

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Incredibly driven by mentorship, but not only that, he has worked

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with some of the biggest brands.

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You can imagine.

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Nike golden state warriors, Rosetta stone.

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He's worked with grant Cardone.

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He's worked with all the big names.

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He's spoken 730 times in 17 countries.

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I mean, he's featured in every major newspaper, every major publication

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he's been on news multiple times.

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He's like the go-to guy.

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And he started at Yahoo with this guy named Seth Godin a long time ago.

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They worked there together.

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So now you could listen to all that and immediately know this guy's qualified,

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but here's what I can tell you.

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I've seen him at vid summit.

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I've seen him at VIT.

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Some of the following year.

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I've seen him at the military influencer conference.

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I've seen him at all kinds of different little conferences

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and he's extremely humble.

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He's extremely approachable and he's extremely helpful.

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Like this is literally like the ideal guest.

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Okay.

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Dude is not coming on here to just blow you away with how awesome he is.

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He's here to blow you away with knowledge and an understanding of digital plumbing,

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social media, digital marketing efforts.

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But most importantly, today, he's going to talk about what I've talked about many

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times, which is the importance of health.

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And he's going to talk to you about virtual assistants, how he

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has a ridiculous army of them.

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So to speak how they all have playbooks and systems and processes

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and levels to them, their capabilities and roles and responsibilities.

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And this is a shit everyone sleeps on and I'm completely and really

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ready to start building my team out.

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And I'm in the process of doing that.

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And you'll hear about who I work with and who am I, who

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sponsors a show in the middle?

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Yeah.

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But look like, listen, close to this first 20, 25 minutes, we go deep into

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the importance of that help, what that help can afford you, what that kind of

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help costs, what that kind of helped us in terms of time-savings all of it.

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And it's all, it's all things you need to know as a business owner.

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And here's the thing.

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It could be a small.

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Or it could be a big business and you can use the virtual assistance for yourself.

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Personally, if it's a small business like mine, then I can have four to five of them

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doing all kinds of things and I can start eliminating half the shit I don't need to

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be doing, but listen, close to that part.

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And then obviously we're going to get a little bit deep into social media

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and kind of the digital landscape about where things are going.

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So I only bring industry experts and influencers on people who can help

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you become a better entrepreneur, a better business owner, a better

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mentor to the people in your company by deepening your knowledge.

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So we're going to get right into it with Dennis.

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Here we go.

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All right, Dennis, first.

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Thanks man.

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We, no one knows this, but he just had some tech issues, which is complete irony.

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But this is a Friday it's six over here on the east coast and Dennis

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is on his fourth podcast of the day.

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So thank you for that, Dennis.

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But I am really pumped.

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Get really deep into a bunch of things.

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Let's do it.

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All right.

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So look, here's the thing.

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I just went on my Instagram stories and I was like, oh wow.

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When I met you at Vita summit, I saw you at military influencer conference.

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I've seen you a million times times, and you've always been incredibly helpful.

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So I'm like how, you know, way too much I could go into so many rabbit holes.

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It's very different.

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But the first one I want to talk about before we get into the technical

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stuff is obviously you know, the importance of building a team and

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obviously in your case, and what I'm trying to do is a virtual team.

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And it's really odd because I used to be of the belief, like two,

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$3 an hour, like that's horrible.

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You know, all these people in the field until I saw a video that you posted of

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your team and how thankful they were and how much how grateful they were

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that you gave them, you know, a capacity to live the life they want to live.

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And what are your thoughts on people who have the mindset of like, yeah, I,

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I can't, that's too cheap or I'm going to keep it over here in the states.

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Look, I want to create jobs, create opportunity for other people.

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And because I want to hire more Americans than every American, I hire creates

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another three jobs in the Philippines.

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Right?

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So we're growing hand in hand.

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Now you, as an American, you don't want to do things like video editing.

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Do you, you don't want it too crappy.

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The, I don't want to say crappy, but just like lower level things that I

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could graphics designer could do or simple WordPress editing or taking

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content chopping up in different pieces and pushing it out across LinkedIn,

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Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Tik, TOK, Snapchat, all that kind of stuff.

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Those can all be done by people who are following a checklist driven process.

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Step-by-step and thus, it's not that we're hiring people.

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For $3.

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This is not McDonald's right.

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This is not some low end, low wage dead-end MC job kind of thing.

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No offense McDonald's was a client for a little while and said, we're

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creating an opportunity for these folks.

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And the video I think you were referencing was when one of our VA

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say, I'm, I've been so, so happy.

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The last few years growing from, you know, I started with blitz a few years ago.

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I had no experience in digital marketing and I went from $2 an hour, and now I'm

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at $6 an hour, which I know in the United States doesn't sound like a lot, but

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that's actually a lot of money over there.

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Totally.

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And you can live, you can live well, you can have a family, you can do

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all the kinds of things that suburban families are able to do on $3 an hour.

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You know what?

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The average wages in the Philippines, $380 a month.

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Right.

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So they're not living in poverty.

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That's just how it is over there.

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And before COVID, I would go over there twice a year.

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And it's awesome.

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Can you imagine rich, if you went into like, what's your favorite restaurant?

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There's one called here.

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Floriana is here in Wilmington, North

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Carolina.

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Okay.

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So you go to Floriana and you rent out the entire restaurant, you bring

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a hundred of your friends and you say, you know what order anything you want

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drinks order the most expensive steak.

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You know, you have a hundred of your friends at Floriana

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and, you know, celebrate your birthday or something like that.

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And then at the end of the whole gala or whatever, the way to brings

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you the check for the entire.

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But how much would that cost?

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Who knows?

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I mean, I, there's no way I could even fathom that.

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There's no way there's no cost.

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Yeah.

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Awesome.

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So now imagine you do it, you're doing this in the Philippines and

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then the waiter brings you the check.

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You've got a hundred of your team that folks who have flown in,

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drove in, bust in, you're having a celebration at a fancy restaurant and

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the Bill's $300 for a hundred people.

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Yeah.

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How do you feel about that?

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Do you want to do that more

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often?

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I would go two times a year, like you.

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And so we're now doing this in other countries as well.

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So we're going to do one in Nigeria, right?

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Nigeria has got a huge opportunity for digital marketers.

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Guess how much money is life-changing money for someone in Nigeria, $200.

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If you can pay, if you can get someone $200, that is

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life-changing money now for you.

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And I $200 is what's that going to do buy a couple of nice meals, you

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know, whatever, buy a couple shirts or something like that, right?

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$200.

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Can you imagine the kind of impact that you and I are able to make in

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other people's lives across the world?

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These are real people.

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These, a lot of people think our VAs are basically like software programs.

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These are real humans with families, and I just love seeing them do

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stuff that we just don't want to do that it's great for them.

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And it's great for them.

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Right.

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So that, that post you saw, I think it was the VA's were so happy that

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one of them made a video compilation that they, they went to a bunch of

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other VA's on the team and said, Hey, what do you like most about Dennis?

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If Dennis was an object in your room, what would he be?

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And somebody said, oh, he's your cell phone?

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Because I can't live without him.

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Or he's a Frisbee because when we were in Manila, we were playing Frisbee

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out on the grass or so they had some, this is of their own accord,

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just, they organize it on their own.

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And then they sprung it on me on my birthday.

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And they had a whole bunch of each of them making a little thing, saying

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this is what I love about Dennis.

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And it made me.

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Yeah, look, here's the thing I've seen.

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Like I said, I've seen you many times.

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You've worked with ridiculous brands, ridiculous personal brands.

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And I don't know how to say it's like, you don't flaunt.

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What you do.

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Flaunt is the people that help you build what you want to build is they're awesome.

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It's ridiculous.

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Like you're people person like you really?

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And I remember when I saw all a video, I do video for a living.

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Like I know when it's like, kind of put on, right.

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This was not that at all.

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This was the real thing.

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So what you guys didn't see when Dennis was talking, was he

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flipped through this huge book.

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And actually, if you don't mind that as if you could pick it up,

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you've mentioned checklists before.

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Yeah.

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I used to be a pilot.

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We live off checklist and I know you've mentioned doctors,

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pilots, like this is a checklist.

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Yeah.

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What is that you're holding and what can it do for someone who's reluctant

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about VA's not reluctant, but maybe yeah.

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Now ready to go and say, I think I could assemble a team.

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What do you have in your hand and what have you made since hiring your first VA?

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So we have made literally thousands of videos and thousands of articles

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that are in something we call the task library and everything

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that I've ever learned how to do.

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I've made sure to document it every time we have a zoom call with a

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client, we're recording it to pull out the snippets on how we do something.

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Anytime another team member has learned how to do something.

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For example, submit a disavowal report to Google.

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When we see spammy links, when people are trying to Google bolus or hurt our SEO.

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And so here's how you submit a disavow link to Google and get it through.

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And here's how you SEMrush.

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And here's how you build a click funnels landing page using this template.

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And here's how you edit one video.

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And here's how you use a camera when you're on site, you know, filming stuff.

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And here's how you wear a GoPro to, while you're doing that, while

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you have your cell phone and what we've literally recording how we do

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everything, because we know that we're paying it forward in an apprenticeship.

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Learn do teach way.

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We also call it this content checklist software.

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So everything that we're learning, how to do, like how do we set up this microphone

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here, which is actually in view, we've known I go like this and make it out.

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Yeah, no, it's not.

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It's it's well, yeah, kinda, but it sounds

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fantastic in Alberta, you can see it's here.

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Right?

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And then I have this, this road NTG five here.

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Right?

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I learned how to do this from, from other people that are

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experts and digital marketing.

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Doesn't have to be some mystery.

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So we like to say like Richard, when you get on a plane, Are you, is there

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any concern that the pilot's going to crash or not know how to fly the plane?

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No.

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No.

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So with digital marketing, why is it?

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Can you imagine if Russell Brunson wrote pilots secrets, the 10 secrets

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on how you can fly that, you know, you don't know as a pilot or whatever,

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how to be a great pilot, the 10 secrets, like, why are there all these

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secrets there's checklists, right?

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When you go to a surgeon, God forbid, and you have to get some sort of operation.

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Maybe you went skiing and you broke your collarbone, right?

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Something like that.

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Do you, do you think that that surgeon study the secret, the

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secret to repairing the collar?

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Do you think it was a secret?

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So why don't we publish the things that we know?

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So literally I've gone to, and it's not because of me, I just set the example by

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publishing these things, but I've gone to all the people that I know that are

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good at doing something, not because they talk about the thing, but they

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actually are practitioners currently.

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And we say, okay, we're going to point the camera on you.

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And you're going to record how you did the thing step-by-step as a recipe, then

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we're going to have our team of VA's or whatever, go through it and cut it up

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into different pieces and then have other people go through it and see if they

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can, if other people can successfully go through your training three times.

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And achieve the result without needing to talk to you without getting

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stuck, without having questions.

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Then that's a mark of some of a task that can live now in the task library.

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So now we've assembled thousands of tasks in this task library,

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and we've just been adding to it and adding to it and adding to it.

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And I happen to like, this is a prop, but there's actually thousands of

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videos and thousands of things in inside our learning management system.

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Like just literally how we do everything.

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And because I'm lazy, I don't want to do the same thing

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over and over and over again.

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I'd rather just define if I can document how it's done.

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Have it be put in the content library, a task library.

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I don't have to worry about it.

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Yeah.

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I only have one VA and I'm in the process of getting two more right now and they're

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in the field and she's in the Philippines and she's a rock rockstar, but I can

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tell you in the times I experimented before it was completely my fault.

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Cause I didn't document anything.

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And I was just like, you'll figure it out.

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Like I didn't give them a chance.

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And somehow I was like, you'll figure it out.

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It's like, that's not how it works.

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Right?

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Like, and so I learned the hard way, but this is for the audience, Dennis

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is dead on just document everything and until it's right and that way they're

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going to have a fighting chance and then just improve upon those skills,

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especially for VA's do not make assumptions.

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So you might say, okay, this is how we set up a meeting, you know, record the

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zoom meeting and, you know, download the files and make sure you have these

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items in the beginning and whatnot.

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That's not.

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You can't make any assumptions.

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You have to break down every single little step.

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And when you see that the VA is failing, that's actually your fault

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because you didn't train them properly.

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They could be the most amazing VA they're working hard.

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They really, you know, are on your team.

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They're, full-time dedicated to you, but then when your training sucks

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or if you're not there to manage them, because most people don't know

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how to manage, especially managing virtually where you have someone

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on the other side of the planet.

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Who's not in your same time zone.

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Think about this, right?

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Rich.

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So you, you and I know from having VA's that it's, it's a multiplier.

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It can multiply good or multiply bad.

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So multiply bad is when you fail.

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Imagine if you're, if you're not a good manager, you don't know how to manage.

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And your VA is sleeping when you're working and vice versa, and you're not

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able to coordinate, or the only time, you know, how to coordinate is via

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Skype or texting or slack or whatever.

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And you're never going to be able to, or you're too busy doing meetings.

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Meanwhile, your VA's they're sitting there wondering like, gee, I wonder what to do.

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And then you tell them, I'll go Google it and try to figure it out.

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And then they get frustrated, but they're so polite.

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They don't want to say anything about it.

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So eventually they sit there quietly until eventually they just leave.

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Right.

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And then you, Hey, my VA disappeared.

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Why are these Venus disappearing?

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It's because you didn't have a process.

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You've been there.

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I mean, it's, it's the truth.

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So I want to, I'm going to shift from people and some kind of the,

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the people processes to something I wrote down when I was listening to

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some of the podcasts you've been on.

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And you're obviously very, very big on data, but if we don't have a dentist

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type of mind, and we are simply a solo preneur where the veteran entrepreneur

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and like, we finally got kind of like Google business op and we're like, okay,

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I think I got something figured out.

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Like I got Yelp, that's something, you know, like we just have things

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out in the matrix in our minds.

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How can someone like us just extract the data that we need?

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Or what would you suggest to just make it not completely overwhelm.

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Well, the thing that's creating overwhelm is the fact that

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things are stacking up on you.

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And you're the only outlet.

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So it's like Tetris where the things get so high.

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And pretty soon you get overwhelmed, right?

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You know, like level 99, the blocks are falling so fast.

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You can't, you got to kind of like turn them and make them fit.

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Right?

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Like that's, that's what I see most entrepreneurs would like.

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But imagine if you're playing Tetris and you could go every, do

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everything at one 10th, the speed, if you could slow everything down.

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So you can take like matrix, bullet time, you know, where you can, you

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can arrange things the way you want.

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Then the way I think about things, the way you could have a dentist in your

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pocket, like a micro minion, yellow banana Dennis, it is what are the things that

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you're doing that are repetitive, right?

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Let's break.

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Let's literally track, you know, here I woke up, I did my exercise.

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I did a conference call.

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I did this, I did this.

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Let's see where you're allocating your time.

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And for things that are repetitive, everyone's got two or three hours

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a day of repetitive things, right.

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Or things that they've done many times.

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And document how you do those record looms and zooms.

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We, every one of these things, we're always recording every time we're with a

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client or with a partner, or even like we were at dinner at my favorite restaurant

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in Las Vegas, they serve Peking duck.

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Is this crazy Chinese guy, but it's in a super hole in the wall kind of place.

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And we recorded some training because I was with two doctors that were

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just, they had so much knowledge.

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I said, we need to record this, even though we're in a Chinese restaurant

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and it's busy and we're eating duck and all this, because I don't want to lose

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that opportunity because anytime someone can document how that's being done

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and it's recorded, then it can be run.

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It can be turned into a step-by-step checklist.

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So we're at the point where we have people that specialize in taking a

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video, like, like people like me I'll show how to do something on a zoom,

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but then I don't want to spend the time to chop it up and turn it into

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documentation for other people to follow.

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But I'm good.

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I'm sure you you're good.

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Rich.

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You're good.

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And everyone watching a listing, you're good at demonstrating something, but.

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But the other, you know, for every one unit of doing it, there's 20 units of

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putting all this stuff together and editing it, just like producing a podcast.

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Right?

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How much I like, it's fun to be on camera, but how much for every one,

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one hour of effort on camera, how much effort is there in producing and

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editing and all that like 20, right?

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So that's how an entrepreneur is spend the one hour where you have

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excellence in relationships, in the expertise that you have, and then sub

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out all the rest of that other stuff.

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Don't be so proud where you're like, you know what?

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I'm going to learn to edit the video myself.

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I'm going to learn to make this stuff in Canva.

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Click funnels look so easy.

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I'm going to learn to do that.

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Or, you know, in Kajabi or WordPress, or this guy told me they have this tool.

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It's so like, I'm a technology guy and I'm telling you, I don't have time for

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tools because tools actually create more issues, create more confusion.

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They don't save me time.

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They cost you more time.

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Don't they?

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Right.

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The more tools we have them.

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So the way I think about it is document the thing, you know, how

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to do the things that are repeated.

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Just sub it out.

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But if you don't document it, you can't hire a virtual assistant.

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I have a maid who comes over here and some people may hate on me, but she

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comes over here three times a week and she cleans, she does laundry.

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She goes to Costco.

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She will deliver food to friends of mine.

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She'll she'll do anything.

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She'll go to the post office because I just don't have time for stuff like that.

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Right.

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And I just want my time back and you as an entrepreneur

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decide, what's your time worth?

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Is your time worth at least three bucks.

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I hope so.

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So just delegate that out, right?

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So you don't need to have me just literally follow this process.

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We call learn, do teach, right?

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If you're in a new area and you're just starting your business, we're

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like learn from the best people.

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Who've actually done the thing multiple times.

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So you don't have Dunning-Kruger then do the thing.

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And as you're doing the thing, document it.

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So then you can teach other people.

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So if you keep following, learn, do teach your life will constantly be doing new

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things instead of doing the same things over and over again, if you have clients

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and you have to repeat the same thing about who you are or explaining your

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products or services or an onboarding process that you have onboarding

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employees, onboarding clients, guess what?

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That's stuff that you can recall.

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For example, let's say there's a new employee and I could record it.

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And you know, I have to explain to them here's how base camp works.

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Here's how we organize our projects.

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Here's where the, here's how you get access to these different

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tools that we have and all that.

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And here's who you contact for this issue.

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Instead of doing that every single time we have a new person, I would have video that

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says, Hey, Dennis, here, I'm so glad that you are a new person in our organization.

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There's a ton of stuff here, but let me tell you what the three

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components are of what you need to do.

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This is how you get access to systems like your email.

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This is how you get access to the training.

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And this is how you manage your time and, you know, get paid and things like this.

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And I'm going to show you, you're going to click here.

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You're going to click here and click here.

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And if you have any questions you can reach out to Juan and Juan is our

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operations manager and blah, blah, blah.

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So then that video will play every time we get a new person in and

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I'll, I've taken it a step further.

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You might appreciate this.

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Cause you're more, you're also a systems and leader guy.

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So we ask our people to complete their three by three goals sheet.

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So when they come and join us, they have to lay out their personal, physical

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and professional goals, short, medium.

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Long-term right.

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So it's nine boxes because we believe that people should be imbalanced.

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So it's not just making money.

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It's your family, it's your health, all these things.

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Right?

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So we have them fill out this three by three goals.

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And maybe 20 or 30% of the people will fill it out.

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And the other, they were just too busy or they didn't know what to put in

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it, or they're just, they didn't think it was important or whatever it was.

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So imagine you have, you know, 20, 30% of the people are filling it out.

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And then every quarter we come in and we say, Hey, rich, your

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goals from last quarter, this is what you said you want to do.

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This is let's now take a look at how you did against your goals.

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And then let's try to conspire together.

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We're using the resources that we have in the team and our connections

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to, to help you achieve your goal.

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So you're happy.

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So you see us as on your team, we're working for you,

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you're working for us, right?

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It's a great partnership, not this employee factory kind of right.

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But 70% of the people don't do it.

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So you can, we try to set up auto responders like an infusion soft.

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You could try to have their manager get an alert saying, oh, it looks like rich,

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didn't complete his three by three goal.

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Then it becomes like a TPS report cover.

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Right.

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Then no one wants to be based on TPS.

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So then here's what we did.

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We said, okay, We know that processes and training and all that are important.

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What do we need to do well?

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So I asked my buddy grant Cardone to make a video and he it's a triggered video.

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So then this video is sent to them only when they didn't fill out the goal sheet.

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And the video goes like this he's.

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So he's riding his bike, he's on the Peloton.

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I could even probably pull it up and play it for you.

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And it says, Hey Dennis here told me you didn't fill out your three

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by three goals, sheet, shame on you.

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You know, I fill out my goal sheet every day.

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I check out my, you know, keep myself accountable every day and I write

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down my goals for the next day.

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So, you know, uncle Grant's watching you, whether you're full on your goals or not.

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Right.

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Can you imagine though, like you're, you're going through your train and you're

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doing stuff and all of a sudden get a text message and it's as a grant Cardone.

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This obviously just takes it a step further in terms of how these

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are not just, VA's like my VA's now, to me, she's an obsolete.

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Like she's not, she doesn't just manage email and all these other things.

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So you're taking care of them by even looking at their goals.

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So like, if you're getting the wrong impression that the labor is

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cheap, just because it's affordable, he's actually treating them cheap.

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You obviously got the idea at this point.

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Now I have a follow on question to that though.

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We have you offering and it's podcast production.

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So we were walking them through the publishing the, the distribution

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channel, and then I, this river.

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And I was recording it and I was like, why didn't I just record this before?

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Cause we have all these people asking and they want to sign up and do it.

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Is there anything wrong with preparing a video like that for clients?

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Because all of a sudden it's going to seem less, less customizable.

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Like it's not about me anymore.

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I'm not special because it's not a personalized video.

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It's actually the exact opposite of what people think.

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So people who say that say, oh, I don't want to do this

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canned robotic kind of stuff.

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I'm all about the one-on-one relationship and customizing and

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really getting in there and also okay.

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If you want to have the time.

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To spend like that with the client, you've got to automate all the

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other sort of like set up, you know, administrative clerical kind of stuff.

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Cause if you're stuck, look, I've, I've looked on the inside

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of a lot of entrepreneurs houses.

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Like, you know, you go to a friend's house and maybe they didn't know

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you're coming and they're quickly like trying to move stuff around.

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It's like, oh, they don't want rich to see that our place is actually dirty.

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Right.

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I've been on the inside of a lot of entrepreneurs houses, and it's a disaster

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and they spend most of their time doing administrative and clerical stuff.

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So VAs help you do all that kind of stuff.

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Like laundry, like basically in your business, there's laundry and washing

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dishes and like mopping the floors so that you actually have the time.

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Because I want to spend quality time one-on-one with key relationships,

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I outsource everything else.

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You see, it's exactly opposite.

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I have to tell you about my sponsor rocket station.

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The show started to take off.

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I got approached by a few companies.

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I was really thrilled, but I approached rocket station.

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I'm like, let's work together because I work with you already.

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I love what you guys are doing.

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I love how you guys have transcended my business with your system to help

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find and place VAs and companies.

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And we worked something out and I was thrilled about it.

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And I want to do everything in my power to help you by just letting

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me tell you a little bit about them.

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So, first off, you've heard a little bit about what Dennis has said, and there

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are absolutely an unbelievably affordable VA's out there, but the difference between

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rocket station is there's a complete and full fledged screening process.

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There's a process mapping, meaning they're going to help you map out all

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the things at that first VA or first couple of VA's are going to be doing.

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Okay.

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I have not seen that anywhere else.

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Okay.

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When the VA is placed there's check-ins okay.

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So I believe for the first 90 days, there's an ops manager.

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Who's directly overseeing them.

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And throughout the year and almost a half, I've worked with my, my main one

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Ellie I'm constantly in communication with different people on the team.

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They check in on me the entire rocket station team.

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So it's not just kinda like Ellie's out there alone and unafraid, and it's not

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like I'm the business owner alone and unafraid with, with her, you know, we,

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we monitor progress, we monitor goals.

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She's already gotten a raise.

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And I mean, it has helped me in ways that I can.

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Even explain.

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So if you listen to anything Dennis had to say, and you are interested

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in looking for virtual assistants that can turn into solo, social media

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managers, ops leads, you know, your finance associates, whatever the

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hell it is, you need rocket station.

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We'll have you covered.

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So check them out.

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There's two places you can check them out.

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And you have to mention that you talk to me, you have to mention

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that you talked to me or you heard about them on the leadership locker.

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You can emailBrooks@rocketstation.com.

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Okay.

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That's brooks@rocketstation.com or you can go to and set an appointment

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at landing dock, rocket station.com.

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And that is going to get you $500 off your process mapping.

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And trust me, the entire thing is completely and beyond

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reasonable and affordable.

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If you actually give a shit about your business and are willing to invest

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in it, and I'm talking far, far, far, far more affordable and seamless

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than anything you would do over here.

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All right.

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Hi, I'm living proof and the team's growing.

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So check them out.

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Let's get back to Dennis.

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So I'm going to make a sharp right off of VAs and that kind of stuff.

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And I want to talk about social and I mean, there's plenty of things.

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There's a zillion things.

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That's a loaded question, but so the Simone Biles, for example you know,

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she, she kind of tapped out, so to speak for the Olympics, mental health,

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mad respect, no issue there when people want to take a break from social.

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And let's just say, they've been posting consistently for a year, year and a half.

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They've built up the following, they've built up their Instagram or whatever, and

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maybe they just literally want to break and maybe you do outsource some stuff and

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maybe you could continue posting, but what would your advice be to people who the

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creator themselves or the, I don't know.

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I don't like the word influencer, but what would you say to that person?

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Who's like, look, I need a 30 day break.

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I'm going to do an absent August or a disappearing December.

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What would you say.

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Great.

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Take it.

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Just like if your body's tired sleep, if you don't feel like working out, don't

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a lot of pressure where people feel like they have to keep up with the Joneses.

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I think it's not like Instagram is necessarily evil, but certainly there's

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a lot of comparing going on and it's the high school cafeteria basically.

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Right?

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And so anytime you feel pressure, whether you're a Simone Biles and

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people think that, well, you need to, you're a gymnast and you need

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to do this and you don't have to.

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And with things like content here's, here's the key insight

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that I had that significantly reduced the amount of pressure.

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I realized that by having reusable content and storing our greatest hits and turning

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those into ads and having VA's repurpose that content, I did create the content.

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So it's not ghost written content.

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It still is my content, but it's being chopped up in different

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pieces and being distributed.

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Then I could take three months off and create no content and feel zero guilt

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engaging though, like, I mean, so I guess this, this is a perfect

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segue into, you know, VA's helped distribute and cut and edit.

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What about on the engagement part?

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Some people will be like, dude, are you nuts?

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Like it's gotta be you.

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And then there's other things where I would argue that you're going to get a

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lot of common comments that are easily replaceable and repeatable by a VA.

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What's your stance?

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Well, look, you're meeting Simon Sinek in a couple of weeks, right?

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You're going to record some stuff with him.

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And some other friends we have in common.

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Do you think that Simon's replying to every single person

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on Twitter and Instagram and Facebook and Tik TOK and all that?

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Nope.

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The Nazy not authentic.

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Of course he's authentic.

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You know,

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maybe he'll spend 10 or 20 minutes a day doing that.

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So let's say you're in a Tony Robbins coaching program, right.

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Or, you know, add my lead or add my let's of client.

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Do you think that he actually was there on Twitter and Instagram?

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It was costing him a lot of his sleep.

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And I said, dude, we need to have, we need to put a VA on that.

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He said, no, no, it needs to be me because I care so

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much about this guy.

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I'm an hour, a day syndicates.

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I was like, yeah, I know, I know you mean he's like really

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tries to be dedicated, like

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cares.

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But when you have that big look, the bigger your audience becomes, the more

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you have to delegate to other people.

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So Jim Senegal runs Costco.

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He's a CEO of Costco and he still tries to visit every one of the what 300 Costco's.

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So there's a crazy number of Costco's.

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Okay.

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And he tries to visit all of them, but do you think he can talk to every single

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Costco employee across the nation and then they're even international too.

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So what he does is he delegates out and he creates teams of other people that are

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there to do coaching there, to manage.

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So the larger your organization grows, the more you need to start bringing in

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other people as number twos, number three.

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So what we have.

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A nine level system.

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So even if you're an, you're a sole proprietor, you're a solopreneur

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that this still works for you.

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And she's still thinking about this.

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Cause I, I lost a lost a lot of by making this mistake, listen to this.

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So when we have our nine level system, so when someone comes in as a level

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one and they learn how to do some very basic things, and then he learned

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another skill, their level two, then they learn how to optimize level three

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and then become a team lead level four.

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So we have these different levels.

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The minute someone becomes a level three, they can start to train up a level one.

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And when they become a level four, they can train up a tour,

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one, a level five, they can train up a three, two or a one, right?

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So as we get more people into the system and they level up, then

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it's their obligation as part of an apprenticeship model to train up other

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people that are two levels below them.

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No, I'm a level nine in the system.

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So technically I could train a level seven all the way down to a level one, but if

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a level one is trying to get training from a level nine, the distance is so

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high that it's hard to relate, right?

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So the best train, the best person to train a level one is a level three,

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because that level three is just slightly ahead of what that level one is.

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So it's not MLM.

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There's, there's no like downline where you're getting paid for.

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Bringing more people into the program is because you believe in the idea of

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learn, do teach and systematizing and, you know, study where you study the

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training that was done by somebody else.

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You do it yourself.

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And then you document how it's done so that as the screenshots change in Google,

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my business or Google analytics or Facebook ads, or what, as the interface

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has changed all the time, they can come in and update that core training.

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So all the other people that continue to come to the training

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are working with something that's.

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This is like the Marine Corps, like lands core roles of teaching privates.

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When I was a pilot, you know, you know, the operating

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manual, like our, our, the SOP.

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Yeah.

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The SOP is, and the read and initial board, like someone's updating it.

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And then we mark up, we've read it.

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And initial, I mean, it's, it's a great, great system.

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And I love how you've replicated that.

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Now we know.

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That you know, and are an expert in allowing your team to create a lot

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of content out and be everywhere from everything that you're doing.

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I mean, you talk about how you record everything you've

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been on for podcast today.

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So all of it's going to get diced up chopped up and put in the right

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places now while that's fantastic.

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Do I really need a pulse everywhere?

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Do I need to be on Snapchat and Twitter and Instagram?

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I mean, I just, because I have the capability to be all those places, do I

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need to be, what is your take on that?

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Cause I get that question all the time.

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So I separate out the content production with the content distribution.

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So the fact that we're making video content here on riverside.fm, that's the

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production piece, but then we can cut out snippets that become Instagram stories.

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We can pull out little highlights to become.

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We can turn this into a YouTube segment.

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We can load it through all the different podcasts.

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I mean, you certainly know that because of what you do professionally,

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you know, better than I do, but you, you know, but most people don't know

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that the production of the content is separate from the distribution of

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the content and it's fine, you know, Twitter and Facebook and LinkedIn,

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these, they all have different formats.

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So you need a team of people to take that long form content and

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then chop it up and make it work.

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The way you're going to work in YouTube is different than the way

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you're going to work on Instagram.

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But it doesn't mean you're creating content separately for every

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single one of these channels.

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So then people are like, well, should I be on Google or should I be on

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Facebook or should I do LinkedIn?

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Or should I do whatever?

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And I'll say, would you like me to cut your left arm off or your right arm?

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How about neither.

Speaker:

I mean, I guess the question is how do you decide, like, what if your heart

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isn't in Twitter, you know, like, should you still be making the tweets?

Speaker:

I'm not even making the tweets look, I got a blue check mark on Twitter.

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I want to say 14 years ago, I have 71,000 followers on Twitter and I just

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kind of forgot about Twitter the last 10 years and did almost nothing on it.

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Right.

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I might tweet once in a while.

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And Instagram has a thing where, you know, you post and it'll auto post

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on Twitter if you select it, because I just didn't want to be there.

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I didn't have time.

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I only time basically for LinkedIn and Facebook and Google, those are

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kind of my three and everything else.

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I just don't have time for us.

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What I thought then I realized, wait a minute, if I have other team

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members that are there that know my voice and they're able to post it.

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They can handle that.

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And it's not inauthentic because it's, they're actually taking

Speaker:

my content and repurposing it.

Speaker:

That's the difference.

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They're not writing my content.

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They're repurposing my content.

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They're engaging as me.

Speaker:

And then they're going through things like chat bots, you

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know, Instagram has a chat bot.

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You can do chatbots now where people can have conversations.

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It's just like text messaging campaigns where, you know, Gary, your grant will

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say, yeah, you want to have a, you know, let's give you here, text me at this

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number and let's chat about whatever.

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You're not texting with grant Cardone.

Speaker:

Are you kidding?

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No, it's just a text message, right?

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Yeah.

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I want to say one thing about what you said about the voice.

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Like it's inevitable, even if they don't necessarily have contact with

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you that they'll understand your voice.

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I was so surprised the first time.

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She's like, Hey, you didn't have copy, but I put it in for you.

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I'm like, what'd you do?

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And I was like, wow, this is dead on.

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I'll tell

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you a secret.

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My LinkedIn, I've had a friend of mine manage my LinkedIn the last three months.

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He's done all of these posts.

Speaker:

He's driven higher engagement than I have.

Speaker:

Which is like, he's being more, how can someone be more dentists than dentists?

Speaker:

And no one has once said a word, right?

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We've driven probably a million views on my LinkedIn post.

Speaker:

Cause some of them will take off.

Speaker:

And if you just look, it's just consistently positive feedback, you know,

Speaker:

people like, wow, that's an amazing quote.

Speaker:

And what the, and the Sam Wednesbury, he's the one who

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would let the cat out of the bag.

Speaker:

Now that demonstrated the single it works.

Speaker:

But before he could come in and ever get my LinkedIn, he had to study the content.

Speaker:

He had to make sure that, you know, he was a practitioner of the things that

Speaker:

we preach by doing, by doing all these things, by having VA's, by building

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up a team by, you know, talking about personal branding, all of these different

Speaker:

things so that he was qualified to do it.

Speaker:

I saw some of his sample.

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I made him go through this whole Riggleman role to qualify, like really

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made him run through the gauntlet.

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He did really well.

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He produced sample content for me.

Speaker:

This looks good.

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Yeah.

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Wow.

Speaker:

This, this looks really, really good, right?

Speaker:

Or he took a podcast.

Speaker:

It could be our leadership locker podcast and pull out some of the quotes that I've

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made or you've made or condensed them.

Speaker:

So they can be turned into tweets or turned into Brightree, which

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is like one sentence paragraphs.

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Right.

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That's the only thing.

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And it's working super well.

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It's still my content.

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It's still my values.

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He's just kind of editing what I've been saying, but not

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coming in with something new.

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And so that's working super well on LinkedIn.

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So I only look at LinkedIn once in a while just to kind of see what's cool.

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And someone wants, I think it was Shaleen Johnson.

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Who said the people who are on social media the most are the

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people who are on it, the least.

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But you know what I'm saying?

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Like, you're on it all the time, but you're not actually on it.

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You

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want to reach Gary Vaynerchuk.

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You're not going to be on vain or medias that he's not there.

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And you might be able to get them on Twitter here and there.

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Yes.

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True.

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Same thing.

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He was like not to be political, but those, those tweets were

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tweet tweeted by other people with intentional spelling mistakes.

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Right?

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Yeah.

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That's crazy.

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You are a notorious for the dollar a day, not notorious, but infamous

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or whatever the appropriate word is for the Facebook dollar a day thing.

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And actually, you know what, let me hold off on that.

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The reason I actually reached out to you right away was when I saw you had

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a post, I forget where it was posted.

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It's probably posted multiple places about being locked out of Facebook.

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I'm like, so the guy who spent a billion dollars on Facebook

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is locked out of his business account, like has hell frozen over.

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And I know you so well, it feels like that.

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I was like, I got to find this out, cause this is what everyone preaches, right?

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Like that you don't actually own the content or your space there.

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Can you talk a little bit about that if you're at Liberty

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to and what the outcome was?

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Yeah.

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So Facebook is rented.

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And all social media is rented land, but the reason why we're there is because

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there's a lot of people that are there.

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And a lot of people say, oh, you need to be on your website

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because it's your property.

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Yeah.

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But you got to get people to come to your property.

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So you still need social media.

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You still need Google.

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You still need email.

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You still need to bring people to your property.

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So it's not that one is better than the other.

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So that's called owned, earned and paid Facebook happens to be

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the Google of social networking.

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They are the dominant social network.

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So you kind of have to be there because everyone is there.

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And there's so many sub-niches there that it doesn't matter what the niche is.

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It's on Facebook.

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And so we've run a lot of ads on Facebook for a lot of companies

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and we have a lot of data and.

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Sometimes we get ad accounts banned because algorithmically they're setting up

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these different rules and they took that.

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They tuned the rules to sometimes be more sensitive and sometimes they

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tune it back because Sheryl Sandberg who's the COO who's really the one

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that runs Facebook, not Zuckerberg.

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Zuckerberg is more like a figurehead hanging out with billionaires now.

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But Cheryl said, because she came from Google show around sales at Google, she

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said, we want to be able to grow Facebook without hiring 50,000 more employees.

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Let's try to automate it.

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Let's try to make the bot really smart.

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And so the global sales team, which has only a couple thousand people,

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that that's why you can't reach them because there's only a couple of

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thousand people you're trying to serve.

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I think they have 7 million advertisers now.

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Good luck trying to get through that one hole, but I spend $10,000.

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Yeah, good luck.

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That's nothing.

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Okay.

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Compared to Facebook made one $22 billion last quarter.

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So it's nothing.

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Okay.

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So, because they're doing it through automated means any one thing that gets

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you in trouble can ricochet or avalanche into multiple accounts being banned.

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And then the entire business manager being banned, which is what happened to us.

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So I use some of my contacts at Facebook to say, Hey guys, this is ridiculous.

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Right?

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Cause we I've been banned 15, 20 times and each time it's like, all right

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guys, you know, this is ridiculous.

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Just go ahead and fix it and they'll fix it.

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But they won't say anything and I'll say, okay, what, what, what role did I break?

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We can't tell you that because it's confidential.

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Okay.

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Yeah.

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But you unbanned means, so what I get banned for in the first place?

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Well, there was an error in the system, what error in the system.

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Right.

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And if I'm the one having this issue, like you mentioned rich, good luck

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for someone who doesn't have any kind of cloud or hasn't spent any money,

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some random dry cleaner in Minnesota.

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Good luck on them trying to get their account.

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Right.

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At least I know who the people are.

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At least the Facebook executives.

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They've seen me on TV talking about Facebook, you know, this kind of thing.

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So it, unfortunately, that's where it is now because it's, this

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is something we've brought upon ourselves because of the scrutiny

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from Cambridge Analytica and Russians and Chinese manipulating the election

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through the dollar a day technique, which is the one that we taught.

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Then there's been so much the government's by the way, going to

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come down real hard on Facebook.

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And the next year you're going to see Instagram probably be broken

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apart, just like the airlines or telecoms being deregulated.

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You're going to see this kind of thing happen because it's privacy.

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There's no escaping this privacy scrutiny data, you know,

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monitoring patient information.

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What are your you're never like the, it will come like Facebook

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has been so smug Senator.

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We run ads that they think that they could get away with it.

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Cause all we're smarter than the senators were, were Silicon valley.

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We were years ahead of them.

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Yeah.

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Well the government's slow, but the government will catch you eventually.

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So two

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questions.

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Do you still recommend the dollar a

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day method?

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Absolutely.

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It's giving you a little color just to show you kind of like what's bomb.

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No, I got it.

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But here's the deal.

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Whether you're big or small dollar a day is even more

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powerful today than it was before.

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Why?

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Because the cost of traffic is going up.

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The AI is getting smarter.

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So if you can put content 15, second videos, one minute video.

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Of people of you, of your clients, of your knowledge of you, you know, your

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favorite coffee place, like whatever it is, little moments of who you are,

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the system will optimize for you.

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The system will do the targeting.

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The system will do the bidding.

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The system will do the optimization.

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The AI is so smart and we can talk if you're a real geek, you know, we

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could talk about this later, but just, I can talk about the machine learning

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behind what the algorithm does.

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Basically.

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You just put content in there, let it run for a dollar a day.

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Anytime you have an interesting piece of content, don't make it only sales content

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have a mix of different kinds of things.

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Put a dollar day against it.

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And maybe in the first month you put out 10 little one-man videos, boosted for

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a dollar a day, do it on Twitter too.

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You can do the same thing on Facebook reuse the same video.

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I literally am doing this like yesterday.

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I had people in our private coaching group that you can see,

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they're making a bunch of these, these videos that are here, right?

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We're just making videos.

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And then I'm taking that video and I'm posting a Twitter and boosts.

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That takes a minute.

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It literally takes me one

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minute.

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It's just a boost.

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Like you're just saying, I want more people to see

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this.

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Yeah.

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I said, Hey, my buddy, Bruno's the top affiliate marketer in Nigeria.

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Look, this is what.

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Top affiliate marketer in Nigeria.

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Why is that burnout?

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So he talks about affiliate marketing for 20 seconds.

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I put that on Twitter, the thing's gotten whatever 10,000 impressions

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so we can grow as audience.

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I take it to Facebook and I cross posted.

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I cross posted Instagram.

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So I made three posts at the same time.

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And I boosted it all within two minutes.

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There's no

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experience.

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No, I'm with you.

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So you, and I know this 10 pieces of content, two or

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three of them are going to hit.

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You could put a little bit more money behind it, and I know how you feel

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about not putting too much behind it.

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Like go from one to three or go from one to five.

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But here's the funny thing.

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And this is more of a personality thing.

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The videos that you think are going to hit usually don't and the ones that you

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don't think are going to hit do well.

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Why.

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It's because we are all Dunning Kruger, people who think we know, but we don't

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actually know the minute you realize that you're an idiot and you're wrong.

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Like I've spent so much money on ads.

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Like I think I'm an expert.

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I think I know, I think I can look at a grid of ads and say, you know what?

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I think this one's going to do the best and I'm wrong.

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It's always going to be the plain looking one with the ugly landing page.

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Right.

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Cause I, you know, I'll choose the polished video or I'll choose

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the one that really resonates with my own personal biases.

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But you're right.

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When you put 10 of them out there, the one that wins is usually not

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the one that you think is going to win when you have different landing

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pages or if you redesign the website, the new website usually does poor.

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Why?

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Because it looks nicer because it pleases the owner, but it doesn't convert.

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So if your goal is conversion, then what you want to do is create 10

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or 15, one minute videos, different angles, not all the same thing.

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And then put a dollar a day against them for $7.

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Since you have, you have 10 of them.

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So you put $7 on each, you spent $70 and you're testing.

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And you're figuring out what the winner is in the winter.

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You put $10 a day against this.

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He spent, so we did this with infusion soft.

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This is a, which is a marketing software company.

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And we made a whole bunch of videos talking about marketing automation

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and email and landing pages and small businesses and why they were

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struggling and software so difficult.

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And like, I mean, also it's just like all kinds of spaghetti

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on the wall sorts of things.

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And the one winner we could never predict predicted, but we spent $1.3

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million on that winner over time.

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It was, you know, those, those shows where people sing or whatever.

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And then eventually there's down to like eight of them and four of them, then

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there's like a winner at the, after, you know, the people get voted off.

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I view Facebook ads as this microcosm, or it could be like, whatever, what

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is it like the sweet 16 where there's the NBA playoffs semi-final and then

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like one week they battle it out.

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Whatever your favorite sports analogy is, you know, NHL playoffs, whatever.

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That's the way I view any kind of ad driven system.

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It could be Facebook or Twitter or LinkedIn is you're creating a, but

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like these are all different teams and I love all the teams, but I'm

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creating a lot of little videos that I think might be pretty good.

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And then we're just putting them into the system.

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Let's say there's 32 of them, or however many put into the system,

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put a dollar a day, close the lid.

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And the S and then the Facebook does all the work for us.

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Twitter does all the work, their AI it's the same AI, LinkedIn, same AI does all

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the workforce and says Tata of the 32.

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This is the one.

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Okay, well then I'm going to put a thousand dollars on that one.

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And some people say, well, I'm a, I'm a big player.

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I'm not gonna play your dollar a day thing.

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I can spend a thousand dollars right now.

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Yes.

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But when you rather test and then the winner put $10,000 in the winner, or

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you are so confident, you're just going to go ahead and bet it all on black.

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So

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we're talking views and visibility right now.

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So to me, what you're saying is awareness.

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At what point are we talking?

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Like, no kidding ads.

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Like, I want you to click on this so you could visit my landing page because a lot

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of people misconstrue organic versus paid.

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And there's that, that leap is really tough.

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Even if you're talking about the dollar a day to boost, when are we

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talking about putting money behind ads?

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Okay.

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So the algorithm, and when I say algorithm, I mean, w whenever there's a

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social network and there's lots of content in the system has to prioritize what shows

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up in people's feed, because there's more content than you can possibly consume.

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That's what I mean by the algorithm.

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The algorithm is looking at, what's got the highest engagement rate.

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Who's staying the watch, which is called dwell time, which is what

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tick-tock is looking at in particular more than the other networks.

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And those are the items that will continue to show in the feed.

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Now, I'm not saying you have to have some crazy Miley Cyrus, 10 million views.

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I mean, we're not trying to do something, you know, ostentatious or confrontational,

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just something that, that resonates where we're getting good engagement.

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So the thing that gets good engagement, organic.

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Is also the thing that we'll do well, if we boost why?

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Because boosting is using the same algorithm to put fuel on the fire.

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Now where people make the mistake is they think, okay, well Dennis

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said that whatever has the highest engagement you should put more money on.

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So then they put out a bunch of videos and guess what drives the highest engagement?

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The one with the cats, the kittens, or the babies, or the bacon

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or things like that, that have nothing to do with their business.

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But it got the highest engagement.

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And global Dennis told me that, no, that's not what I said.

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What we're saying is every business is here to drive sales, right?

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Leads, calls people, filling out a form, selling courses, packages, retainers,

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whatever it is you're selling, right?

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So you start at the bottom, which means selling right?

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The conversion with three stage funnel, start at the bottom

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and you start remarketing.

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So what do you do?

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Dollar a day?

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People who have been to your website, people who are in your email list, people

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who are in a remarketing audience, right?

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And you guys all understand remarketing, right?

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So we start there and then as we're feeding in the conversions, this is

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what we'll call digital plumbing, which is putting all the date like Google

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tag manager, our email audiences, that conversion API, the tracking different

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events, all these different things, like all your data being shared properly to

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Google and Facebook in the right way, which is what, you know, stuff like.

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This is all about.

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If the data is being shared in the right way, then you're sending the

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signal to Facebook or Google, or whoever is saying, I want people, I

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want more people to buy this particular.

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If they click on this link and they bought this course, or they fill out

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this form, or they clicked on this thing to have a phone call with me.

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Cause you know, Google has called tracking that kind of thing.

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Google my business, all that Google ads.

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Right.

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Then I want more of these sorts of people.

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They're like, oh.

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So then they take the remarketing audiences, which are the people

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that didn't buy, but they're in your email list, their past customers,

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they've been your landing page.

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They watched a video, whatever it is.

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And we keep seeing those ads that follow you around.

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So all the, all that remarketing, then, you know, you followed around

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on the Twitter and Facebook and LinkedIn and all these other places.

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Cause that's what we marketing is we care about that next 24 hours

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when you had that initial touch, but they didn't buy, we follow her on

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all the different networks, right?

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So that's where dollar a day starts because it, because think about how

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much that traffic's worth, you paid all, you paid five bucks, a click to

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get people to come to your website.

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Then you have, you know, however many people that you spent money on.

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All those people are really close to buying, but only 2% of them bought,

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which means 98% of that traffic.

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You lost, you have no way to talk to them again.

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So use dollar a day to remark it real hard on that audience.

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What do you think?

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Let's say you have a thousand potential buyers that came to your website or leads

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or, you know, going to a landing page, learning about your products and services.

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Let's say a thousand people in a month.

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How much do you think it costs to bombard those people on Facebook?

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With up messages.

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Cause they were just on your site.

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I mean, I don't know about a dollar a day, so about $30 for a month.

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Yeah.

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And is it worth it?

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Is it worth spending $30 to just bombard people who have been to your

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website, but didn't buy and assuming you drove good traffic, assuming

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that it was SEO, assuming you had to list assuming like whatever it

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was that drove traffic to your web.

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Is it worth a dollar a day to be able to hammer those people with other messages.

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Obviously you don't want to give them the same message you want to give

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them something that's not creepy.

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You want to add a little value.

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You want to mention something else that they might have thought about

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or talk about your firm or show, you know, rich Cardona is the leaders

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like another, like something else that you might do because they didn't

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buy it just to generate more trust.

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Right?

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There's other things you can say to them, right?

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If you had another.

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Right.

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So why not have dollar?

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They start here at the bottom, which then drives more sales.

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And as you drive more sales, guess what you re reinvest back into the machine.

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And then you start to drive engagement audiences, which is collecting email

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addresses, getting people to the website, getting them to the chat bog

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and the phone number, people watching your video for at least 30 seconds.

Speaker:

Like there's all these different things, right?

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Then as you're making money there that drives more into the remarketing

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pool, more people on the website, more people calling more people, whatever.

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Right?

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So you're starting from the bottom and we're investing up.

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And as we make money, we're bootstrapping and investing up.

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And then once you have this system working and you're at least 50 conversions per ad

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set per week on Google, on Facebook, on whatever it is, cause you're passing all

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the same conversion data, it's the same tracking that's called digital plumbing.

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Then you can invest in building your name overall like a Gary Vaynerchuk or grant

Speaker:

Cardone or whatever, where you start doing lifestyle things like here's my jet

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or stuff like that because you, you know that by building these audiences enough

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are going to flow down to become leads and enough will float on to become sales.

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So dollar day means starting from the bottom going up.

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And that's what most people miss.

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Most people start at the top.

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And so they put out there them leaning against a Lamborghini or

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something like that's not what personal branding and sales.

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Because that's just going to drive you more 18 year old

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kids that like Lamborghinis.

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Yes.

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You'll get more followers, but how's that going to drive your business

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and how does it, how does it provide the signal to Facebook and Google and

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LinkedIn and what you want, if you don't start with the signal down here

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in the bottom, what are you doing?

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Right?

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That is, yeah.

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I mean, this is so embarrassing, but like, I mean, I'm very busy.

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You don't want to say influencer cause they act this way.

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Right?

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I don't care.

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Look, would you rather make a one minute video with this Sony or take

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a picture in front of a Lamborghini?

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What has more value come on?

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This has way more value, right?

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A hundred percent.

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What are there

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influencers, you know, showing stuff like that.

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Last question and thank you.

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I know we had a little trouble at the beginning, so I

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appreciate the extra time here.

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So obviously we do well, not obviously, but we do video production.

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So, you know, when we have a podcast or when I have do videos for someone, we'll

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make sure we have them in all the formats.

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They need to repurpose anywhere.

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They need to, you know, obviously TechTalk and Instagram and everywhere else.

Speaker:

But now we're obviously starting to see the rise of short form

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content, which is obviously something you've been preaching forever.

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But YouTube shorts, reels, and, and these kinds of things like are, are

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these things going to pick up steam, especially shorts I'm like particularly

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interested in shorts for some reason?

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Well, we don't know officially from YouTube, but I think that

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YouTube shorts is here to stay.

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And it's not a fad because for the last 15 years we've seen Google attempt, social

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networking they've started their own.

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It could be 360, it could be waived.

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They fought other social networks and every single one

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of them's failed, hasn't it?

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That's right.

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So they're so eager and desperate to win and social that they finally

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said, you know, If you're on YouTube, we're going to violate the holy grail

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and have one minute vertical video.

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And w what, if you tell that to a YouTuber they're going to turn in their grades

Speaker:

are going to say what it's supposed to be, you know, landscape, you can't

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do vertical video on YouTube because with YouTube, you're supposed to have

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That kind of thing.

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Right?

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So now you two shorts and you guys, you know, you, you know, between

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friends of ours, there's folks that are just absolutely killing

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it on YouTube and Instagram reels.

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Cause they're trying to kill Tik TOK or things like that.

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It's because that is where things are going.

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It's not a fad.

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It's the young now I'm going to stereotype, but the younger generation

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has less and less attention.

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Maybe it's because of the mobile phones or add or whatever it might be.

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There's a dog in the background.

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I think you can.

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Right.

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See it just, oh, look squirrel.

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Yeah.

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But with the younger generation being so addicted to cell phones and

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technology and this multi attention kind of thing going on, we've got to

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create content that appeals to them.

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I saw McDonald's is killing it on Twitter yesterday.

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They were posting something about this raspberry slushie.

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I'm not even saying it.

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Right.

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And then they showed an egg McMuffin and apparently that's a tick tock thing.

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That's that they're tuned into.

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That's resonating with that audience.

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And because.

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That means I'm too old.

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I'm like that old person that can't program the VCR I've missed it.

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So now I've got to spend time with my younger friends who

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can explain this stuff to me.

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Well, I will say this really quickly is the ability to practice being

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concise is unbelievable and being educational and concise and entertaining.

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The amount of creative people I've seen around my age is like ridiculous.

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And I'm going to tell you something really quick, right before our call.

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I'm like, I haven't read anything today.

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So I didn't, I forgot 10 minutes of reading yesterday.

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So I'm like, well, I got to set an alarm for 20 minutes.

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I go upstairs.

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And because I saw a tick tock two days ago, where a guy's like,

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here's a trick to help you reading.

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He's like, just read the, read the middle of the page.

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You could use her peripheral vision for that kind of outer edges.

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And he's like to just use your finger.

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And I read like 26 pages and like, I felt like two seconds and I retained that.

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I'm talking about a sh a short video, not a long form YouTube video that

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was going to take me down the rabbit hole of the importance of speed.

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Right?

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Yeah, it's a huge skill to learn.

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And I think it's really taking over peanuts.

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I've spoken at 800 conferences now in the last 30 years, and it's easy

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to give them one hour keynote, you know, it's way harder than a one hour.

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A one minute video, because imagine like you, if you were to condense any topic

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that you had into one, so let's say, let's say your chiropractor, the five things

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that you need to know about migraines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and then, and there you go.

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And that's it.

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You literally, you have to be so on point, you have to know your content exactly.

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Right.

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You know, what's harder than a one minute video,

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15 second video, 32nd video.

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Cause you got to get straight to the thing.

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And so I interview a lot of business owners who have a lot of experience

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and are very successful and I'll ask them a question and they can't

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answer that question in 15 seconds.

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Yeah.

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They want to talk for an hour.

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So we got to learn to be able to say things and literally just one tip,

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like read down the middle of the page.

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You'll be able to read 400 words for a minute instead of 180 words per minute.

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Right.

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I can turn my camera on and off with this little doodad.

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So I don't, so it saves me a bunch of time as I'm recording.

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Oh, cool.

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That's one cool little tip for people who build courses, right?

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Or, Hey, how do I do my lighting here?

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Well, this is what I do with this lighting.

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And this is how I set the levels and all this, like how do you do one.

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Boom, 15 seconds.

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Just like while I'm standing in line or while I'm filling

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the gas at the gas station.

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Just give me this one tip real quick, add value.

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Don't introduce it.

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Just like literally go straight

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to it.

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That's a funny thing.

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And, and we'll, we'll wrap here and then I just want to make sure people

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know where to find you and your courses.

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You know, obviously I got Simon in a couple of weeks and it's so funny

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because like, you've talked about a lot of people were like, started with

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why, but right now I just feel like how two is just ruling everything.

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Like you said, with Dennis,

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let's

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start with

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how I will, I will lead with that.

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So I will lead with that.

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It is really interesting.

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And I used to be a guy who's like, it's all about the why.

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It's all about the why.

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And I've shifted significantly.

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And I will say my engagement and the private DMS, and,

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and that really helped me.

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Or can I ask you a follow up question?

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It's really been a different speaker now.

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Dennis talked about a lot of things.

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He talked about VAs.

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He talked about digital plumbing and we talked about social media.

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I mean, he has courses as a matter of fact, Dennis, I was taking my VA

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through blitz metrics today and I'm like, get that, get that, get that.

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Cause I'm going to be in Nashville next week.

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I'm like, you're gonna study all this.

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And when I get back and I think we're going to do an absent August and I'm

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like, we're going to recalibrate and we're going to hit the last quarter,

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like a freaking bat out of hell.

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So blitz metrics.com is where you can find a Dennis's courses, dentists

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anywhere else people can find and consume some of your content to learn.

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Just Google me.

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You go to YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, whatever it is, whatever your favorite

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way, like there's blogs, go there.

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And you'll find me there.

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If you want to connect with me, connect with me on LinkedIn or on Twitter.

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I'd love to see what you think about this.

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We're always learning.

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I want to hear your examples.

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I'm going to feature your examples.

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So if you're doing one minute videos and 15 second videos, if you like

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rich or any of the other guests he has, which are all top notch,

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I'm honored to be on your podcast.

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I would love to hear about that.

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And I'd love to give you a retweet because we're all about sharing

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and honoring other people that are doing kick-butt jobs sorts of.

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Yeah,

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Dennis is, he's not lying when he says that.

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So at all, Dennis, I cannot thank you enough.

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I glazed over a lot.

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So I'm kind of like, oh, I'm looking at all my questions.

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I'm like, ah, but so good.

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And I appreciate it.

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And the main takeaway, everyone listening really quick is I really am an advocate

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of kind of try and pay yourself last.

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If you could build out that team, Dennis was talking about for the

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first half of the podcast, I guarantee he said in, on our last podcast, he

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goes, you want to make more money this year and it's going to cost you

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a ton of money in the next decade.

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You'll spend the money now and watch your profits go through

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the roof for the next decade.

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So thank you very much for that.

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And we will catch up.

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Thank you rich.

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All right, everyone.

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Go check Dennis out@dennisyu.com.

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And let me tell you, after we talked for a while after the podcast, and I'm

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like, Hey, I'm going to be in Vegas soon.

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Are you going to be around?

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And he's like, yeah.

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He's like, if you come out, let me know.

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So we could go eat.

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And he's like, I like to have meetings over food and I'm like, okay.

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He's like, I like to call them meetings, but he's really like a people person.

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And I love that because I would have obviously opted to try to have

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that interview in person, but our schedules didn't necessarily align.

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So now we're going to have that opportunity.

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This is why I go out to see people because there's a connection.

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So, I mean, this is even better.

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Like we connected remotely had a great podcast, obviously.

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There's good rapport.

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And I've known Dennis for a while now, but now we're going

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to go ahead dinner in Vegas.

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Hell yeah.

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So check him out and do me a favor.

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I keep bringing all of these fucking shit hot.

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I mean, they're fucking good, man.

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And I know, you know, it are, Hey, so in order for this to keep going

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and growing the way I want it to, if you're interested in helping me help

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entrepreneurs, small business owners, veterans, veteran entrepreneurs,

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then ratings and reviews and word of mouth sharing of this podcast ki.

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Okay.

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And I already mentioned in the last couple of episodes, please DM me, email me,

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whatever, because I want it talk to you.

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I want to know who you are, what you do, what you've gained from this,

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what you've lost from this, what you don't like, what I, all of it.

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I want to get to know some of you so I can serve you.

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If I'm having guests on that are just like, dude, like that, didn't do shit

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for me then I need to know, but I want to do the best possible job I can for you.

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And if you get anything out of it, then please just reciprocate

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and send that out to someone.

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It takes 60 seconds to rate it or review it or to share it or to share

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a post or to send the link or to text a link to someone and be like,

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dude, you gotta listen to this.

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This guy, Dennis was on fire or a solo episode with me,

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Richardson, Pyre, whatever it is.

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Last thing I'll say is thank you.

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You heard him?

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I got Simon Sinek coming up.

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That's a dream come true.

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One of my friends is like, are you nervous?

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I'm like, no, like Elmo.

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I can't wait to sit and have a conversation.

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And that's how I look at it.

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It's conversation.

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It's not a podcast.

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I mean, I'll, I dunno, I'll read a couple of things.

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I already read infinite game, but I'm not going to go nuts.

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I want to sit and I want to talk, and I know that you and I share a

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lot of the same questions, but thank you because getting all these people

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and you heard Dennis, like we know a lot of the same people, the names

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floating around, and that helps put me in a position to get better guests.

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And you are the ones helping me do it because I have downloads and

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numbers to back it up, not just names.

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So thank you everyone for supporting the leadership blocker.

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And I am contemplating a new show, a different show and maybe a different name,

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but that is to be determined, but I'm letting know it's floating in my mind.

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You have a fantastic rest of the day, and I really hope you enjoyed this later.