Rich Cardona Media

140. Gary Vaynerchuk on Wrestling, Vee Friends & Stepping Back

June 30, 2021 no comments

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“I don’t like winning. I like the process.”Gary Vaynerchuk

On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich is joined by entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk. Listen in as Rich and Gary discuss pushing boundaries, materialism, and personal branding, as well as wrestling and the New York Jets.

Gary Vaynerchuk is an entrepreneur, author, speaker, and Internet personality. He is a co-founder of the restaurant reservation software company Resy and Empathy Wines. First known as a wine critic who expanded his family’s wine business, Vaynerchuk is now more known for his work in digital marketing and social media as the chairman of New York-based communications company VaynerX, and as CEO of VaynerX subsidiary VaynerMedia.

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Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media

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  • 00:09 – Introduction
  • 11:50 – When is it time to pivot with your podcast?
  • 13:38 – Pushing boundaries in a heavily-regulated industry
  • 15:26 – Hiring for the long term
  • 16:43 – Rich and Gary talk wrestling
  • 26:16 – VeeFriends
  • 30:58 – Gary on owning the New York Jets
  • 34:44 – Materialism and success
  • 39:23 – Rich talks about the impact that Gary has had on him
  • 40:30 – Rich’s closing thoughts

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Connect with Gary:

Website

The GaryVee Audio Experience

Instagram

YouTube

Facebook

Twitter

Snapchat

LinkedIn

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Connect with Rich:

Website

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Transcript
Speaker:

Hey everyone.

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Welcome back.

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It's The Leadership Locker.

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This is your host Rich Cardona.

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This is the place.

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This is the place.

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If you're an aspiring entrepreneur, a new entrepreneur, a seasoned entrepreneur

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who thinks they know everything.

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This is where you come to get influencer and industry expert knowledge.

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Okay.

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That, and then from time to time, I will be doing my.

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Own episodes, self narrated, kind of documenting the journey, things that

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are going on, things that I'm learning now today's guest is Gary Vaynerchuk.

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This is going to be a long intro.

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So if you don't want a long intro start fast-forwarding now or just leave.

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Here's the deal.

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Gary Vaynerchuck is the reason I am an entrepreneur.

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Gary Vaynerchuk is the reason I quit my job at Amazon.

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Gary Vaynerchuk is the reason that I am self-aware.

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He's the reason for many things that have transcended in my life.

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And I have to tell you how it all came about.

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So I was working at Amazon.

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If you don't know any of my history, I'm a retired Marine.

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I spent 17 years in the Marine Corps, retired early, got an MBA that I

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thought I needed because I didn't think I was going to be marketable.

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And then I ended up going to that MBA got me a job at Amazon,

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uh, down in Austin, Texas.

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Uh, I knew on the very, very first day that I was fucked.

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I was like, this is so not for me.

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I can't explain it.

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And the details are irrelevant with exception of one.

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I stayed way longer than I had to.

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And during the course of that time is when I discovered Gary, I was miserable.

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I was drinking.

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I was taking risks.

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I was doing a lot of things out of character.

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And then I came across him.

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I think I was just at home drinking old fashioned on one of my nights off.

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Cause I worked nights.

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So, um, I was like, okay, well let me enjoy a drink tonight.

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The baby's asleep.

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And I don't know what came across.

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One of his videos on Facebook.

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I don't know.

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It's weird cause I've actually never seen any really videos that much more

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of him on Facebook, but I saw a video and I'm like this dude's a clown.

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Like this dude's a straight clown.

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Like who the hell is he?

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And the reason is number one, nothing was edited.

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It was incredibly raw.

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He was swearing, which for whatever reason I thought was

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just, I don't know, different.

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And although I was turned off almost instantly, I watched another video and

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then another, and I was like, oh my God.

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I mean, I just started to be like, this dude knows what he's talking about now.

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I don't know if you watch TV or if you were ever a fan of this one show called

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the west wing, which is one of my, I think probably the best written show ever.

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Maybe.

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Well, it's certainly the best written show.

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I think I've ever done.

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And there's this episode where they have a flashback, you know, to where

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the president's kind of team was forming before he ran for president.

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And let's just say, there's this guy, Josh.

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And he goes to see Sam and he's like, Hey, Sam, Sam's miserable where he works.

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Josh goes to visit.

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Sam pulls them out of a meeting, an important meeting, and he goes,

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Sam, I'm going to see the sky up and in New Hampshire, blah, blah, blah.

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Like, I think he's got something in Samson.

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Let me know if he's the truth, anyone.

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And he saw him and he's like, oh my God came back.

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And he told Sam like this guy's a real deal.

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And then Sam quits his job.

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Well, basically the same thing happened with me, paid a bunch of money to go

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to this real estate conference where I saw Gary was going to be the keynote.

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So I go, I am wearing a suit because I was like, I'm I got

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to dress up for this thing.

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And I also decided I wanted to give Gary a squadron.

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Which I do that now for anyone I have on the show in person, my squadron patch

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means everything to me because, you know, I lost a lot of friends, uh, from that

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squadron and almost to the point where there's almost kind of this weird thing,

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like our, our squadron might be cursed and I want to live my life to the fullest.

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And that was the only thing I could hold on to.

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That was kind of real to me, that that made me feel proud of what

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I had done and where I had been.

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And, and you know, that the purpose I had when I was.

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So I wanted to make sure I give that to him.

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So I paid for the VIP, uh, to make sure I can meet him afterwards as well.

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I strategically myself in order to be able to ask them a question and

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I wanted to see if he was the real deal I had to go for myself and see,

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he comes out, gives a great talk.

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I get to ask a question.

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I get to go give him my squadron patch and I go up on stage to give it to him.

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And then we meet in the back and I mean, we had a, probably of 92nd interaction.

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I have a video of it on my phone.

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And I basically told them I'm miserable at Amazon, but I have a family,

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you know, I don't know what to do.

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I want to start this kind of show where I interviewed veterans and all this stuff.

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And he, he just gave me advice like immediately.

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And he was just dialed in, looking at me, talking to me.

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And then we took a picture, gave a couple of patches to D rock, uh, one for D rock

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and then one for club silver, my friends.

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Uh, who was his chicories chief heart officer.

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And then that was it.

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So I started following Gary religiously.

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I started making content, I quit my job.

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I moved in with my in-laws into their basement, and I just decided

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like, fuck this, you know, fuck this.

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And I decided to take the leap, but you know what?

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And I don't advise this.

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I don't, I didn't have a plan.

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I didn't have a plan at all.

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No plan, no nothing.

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I just wanted to kind of tap into my curiosities.

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And another way to put that is I just really became self-aware of

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what I wanted, what I didn't want.

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And I started kind of, it was just like a natural process of elimination.

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So I went to Claude silver, uh, who was mentoring me, essentially

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the chief heart officer.

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I just met.

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And I wanted to make content for her.

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I went to meet her in person for the first time, ask if I can make content for

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her because she didn't have any content.

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And then she says she trusted me.

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I started making a little bit of content for her, even though

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I had no idea what I was doing.

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I know I wanted her story to get out there, her knowledge to get out there

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and then it turned into a business.

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Okay.

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So the next year, so things started to pick up.

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It was weird.

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I was like, holy shit of businesses happening.

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Next thing I know.

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I see Gary at vid summit.

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Again, I strategically placed myself, uh, in front of a microphone.

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I talked to the guys who were passing it around, uh, in advance

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and I'm like, dude, I gotta be the guy who asked the first question.

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They were like, super cool.

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I've made friends with them.

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And then I got to tell Gary like, dude, you changed my life.

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Here's what happened.

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Here's what I'm doing now.

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I made a donation to your charity cause I wanted to make sure I added

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value to you in a way that wasn't the typical way that people do.

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Uh, I'd love to get 10 minutes of your time in New York.

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He's like, let's do it.

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But before he said that he, and I'm going to have to play this clip somewhere.

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He's like, you have no idea how fucking good that feels, you know?

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And he was just like, we just had this crazy, like 10 to 15 minute

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interaction because of that.

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And it was weird.

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Cause I felt like I was hogging all the time on the Q and a, but it was like

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this incredible interaction we had.

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So then that was that.

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Then I went, I had the 10 minutes with him a year later I did a podcast with him.

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Here we go again.

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I did it again.

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So four years after I met him and I considered my life completely changed.

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Here we are again.

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And here's what I could tell you about him.

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And Andy Frisella is that these guys don't know how to not tell the truth.

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Everything about them is completely raw and real.

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And I am like a magnet to that because that's how I always wanted to be.

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But I always just measured very carefully.

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Like, should I be saying this?

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So life changed a lot dramatically, and I just make it a point to make sure I

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get to interview him once a year, once every year to 18 months, depending

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on what's going on in the world.

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And unfortunately this one had to be remote, but I'm going to tell

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you something about this podcast.

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I just approached it a completely different way.

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If you've listened to any of our other podcasts, they're very, very purposeful.

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And I want to make sure that I'm getting.

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Something, I am pulling something from the guest to make sure that

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you get it and you can use it.

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Well, look, I've spent a bunch of different times with Gary

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and I, and I've had non-formal times where we've talked as well.

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And I mean, even in the elevator, at the building in New York, he happened

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to come in the elevator and we were talking, he's like, Hey, how are things?

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I mean, it was crazy.

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So I've interacted with him like enough times where I felt.

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This is probably a better opportunity for me to ask questions for people.

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I know he's impacted.

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So I reached out to a bunch of people I know who are close to me.

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Who've been very, very deeply impacted by Gary and I, and I got their questions.

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So I asked three questions and then I was like, you know, I just

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want to see him smile and have fun.

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Now, this is strange from a podcasting host perspective because I'm supposed

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to serve you, but I wanted to serve him.

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And I don't know how to explain that to you in any other way.

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Except when you meet someone and you are able to be in touch with someone

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who's changed your life, you just want to figure out a way to give back.

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So my way of giving back to him was taking a break from all the fucking

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questions he gets all the time.

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And just talking about what I know he loves and what I grew up

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loving as well, which is wrestling.

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So we talk about wrestling for probably 10 minutes.

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He's super animated about it.

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And I, you know, if I put any of the videos out, you'll see, he's like,

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like he's just like a fucking kid.

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And that's exactly what I wanted.

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Is that the best for you?

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Probably not, but I don't give a shit.

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And then I do get into personal branding and V friends and, you know, what's

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going to happen when he owns the jets.

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And then I think them, so this is very, a very non-standard podcast.

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But look, this is like a scenario where all I do is

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evaluate how him and, and, and.

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Are people who have had profound impact on my mind, on my success, on the

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manner in which I deal with failure and the manner in which I talk to myself

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in the manner in which I set my goals and the manner in which I spend money

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and the manner in which I approach work-life balance, which is fuck that

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I don't care about work-life balance.

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I give my family what I can, as much as I can when I can.

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I give my work the same and it's different for everyone.

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These people are not on a pedestal.

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And if you could tell by the interviews, I'm not nervous when I'm

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with them, when I've been around them.

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I am exactly as I am and they are exactly as I am, despite

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their unbelievable success.

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I know at the end of the day people more importantly, I know

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they're really, really good people.

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And that is the other thing I'm magnetically attracted to not

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just rawness and authenticity.

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People who are just good, good, like where you don't have to suspect where

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you don't doubt where you just know that the intent is pure and it's real,

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and they want you to win in all that being said, 12 minute and TRO, sorry,

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but you had to know the background.

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So here it is.

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obviously the first thing I always say to you is thank you, man.

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This is literally four years ago.

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June 1st is when I actually went to go see you in LA as a realtor conference.

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And you were making fun of everyone for being in suits.

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And I was like, why am I wearing a suit?

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Like I'm not even a realtor, but dude, from that moment on, you've been

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completely and utterly responsible for the fire that has allowed me to

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become an entrepreneur, take the leap, move in with my in-laws, like all of

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it and then just start a business.

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So I always, always.

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Start with, thank you.

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I've interviewed you a bunch of times, man, but here's the thing, you know

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what I want to give back to you because I know people who've been equally

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impacted and I'm like, you know what?

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I'm going to get their questions.

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And I'm going to ask a couple of questions on their behalf, and I

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really want to do that for you.

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I'm going to start with my friend, Heather parody.

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Heather has had a podcast for three years.

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She's 500 episodes in and her question to you was, and it also,

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she wanted me to tell you, you are the person who convinced her.

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She's not an entrepreneur.

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Oh, that's, she's a creative and she is so much happier that she knows that now.

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Good, but she's 500 episodes in and she's like, I'm not where I want to be.

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Can you ask, when am I just being stubborn?

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And when is it actually time to pivot at

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500 it's time to pivot and you know, that's not normally the Gary V answer.

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I always think everyone's too impatient, but 500 episodes, you know,

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again, there's extra questions here.

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Sometimes people have crazy ambitions that aren't realistic.

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So you don't know if like she might actually have good traction,

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but she wants to be Joe Rogan.

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You know what I mean?

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Like, I don't know.

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I don't know.

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But at 500.

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I've seen a lot of people get the 500 and it's crazy that they're still doing

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it because there is a pivot, but the pivot doesn't mean stop the podcast.

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The pivot means change the format of the podcast or start making a lot of

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content, start making a lot of content.

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For each episode of the podcast and put that on Tik TOK and

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Instagram as an awareness builder.

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Right?

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So rich for you.

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For example, I've got such a big audience on Tik TOK.

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You maybe haven't started that to like, get the awareness.

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You should chop the shit out of this episode and put out like 15

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posts on Tik TOK, because a lot of people can see me in there for

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you and be like, oh, what's this.

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And then that, you know, the pivot, isn't the stopping of it's the,

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it may be the stopping of maybe you're just not built for that.

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But it's more likely change the way you do.

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Your podcast changed the way you post produce and build awareness for it.

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Got it.

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She does make a ton of Tik TOK content and does not podcast related though.

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It's completely different.

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Next question, Rob Rens is a client of mine.

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He's an insurance agent has his own agency, total surfer,

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tack it up, shows up on camera.

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Exactly like that.

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He was getting crushed by compliance for a long time.

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And then all of a sudden his business explodes.

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Okay.

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We're talking insurance.

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He's like, I'm not wearing a polo.

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I'm doing my thing.

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His question was, how far does he continue to push the boundaries of like

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a really heavily regulated industry like that, you know, in the area, in

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the arena of new media, he's like people are starting to catch on and kind of

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copy, but he's like, at what point do I kind of throttle back a little bit?

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It doesn't even need.

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I don't think he needs to.

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I think he needs to be himself.

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You know, I think, you know, the idea of, first of all, the thing

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that really caught my attention is people are starting to copy.

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You can't spend a second on that.

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Rich, do you know many versions of Gary V there are right.

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Even your reaction makes me happy.

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I spend zero seconds on people that copy written me off, take my Bruins

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for beat them and repackage them.

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The people that take my shit that I put out for free and repackage it and stuff.

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And none of that can stop you.

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And none of that just make, you know, I'm worried that he is thinking about

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changing it up because people are starting to be more cash he's he's not winning.

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Cause he's casual be a million cash people who's winning

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because these being authentic.

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So why would he throttle it back?

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I would argue he's probably holding back 10% from the throttle.

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And then that last 10% is where all the magic actually.

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Is

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it trend though?

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It's funny.

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Cause when we met, he was publications, billboards, and

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now we've done none of that.

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All LinkedIn, all, everything.

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And he's just exploded.

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It's insane because,

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because the internet is a much bigger platform than the

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others people underestimate how big the internet really is.

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Yeah, next question is from Greg Brooks.

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He asked when you're an entrepreneur and you're at that tipping point

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where you're like literally at a time.

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And I know you don't like to think people are ever at a time.

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I get all that, but he's like, what?

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Is the tipping point when you're like, I need to focus on generating

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revenue period, point blank.

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However, there's all kinds of administrative shit that needs to happen.

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You need the higher, he's trying to make too much money per year, which is hurting

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him and making him lose money per decade.

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Wow.

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That's

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simple.

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That's a good one.

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Right?

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People

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that are solo preneurs or small teams are too slow to hire the

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next person or the first person.

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Because they want to have, they want to make 180 K this year.

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And by hiring somebody at 50, they're only gonna make one third.

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The problem is by not hiring that person.

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They're going to make 180 this year and 1 92 next year, instead of one

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30 this year in two 14, the following

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and under deliver,

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probably correct.

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Make themselves vulnerable.

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And most of all, make themselves unhappy.

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Look, man, like I've followed your advice unbelievably.

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Like I don't make shit.

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And it goes into the business and it's nuts.

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I mean, it's, it's crazy.

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And I'm just like, I just need to live within my means, like period point blank.

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Like no fancy, nothing, anything like that.

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So I love that.

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So look, dude, I'm going to switch because I want to have fun and

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I'll talk about some wrestling.

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Cause a lot of people don't bring you on to talk about wrestling.

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So.

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Top finishing move of all time,

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give you some that are from my year.

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So the flying elbow for macho man is always going to be my favorite

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cause he's my guy, but I think the shake rattle and roll from the

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honky-tonk man is crazy underwear.

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I think that Hercules is full Nelson, first Hercules Hernandez,

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and then Hercules cause he dropped the Hernandez part is a crazy move.

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I think that the camel clutch is super underrated.

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Iron SHEEX, camel clutch act, you know, like whole Cogans

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leg drop doesn't hurt anyone.

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Neither

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Nelson, come on, come

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on.

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No, a full Nelson.

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You can hurt somebody if you do it a little bit different.

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You know what I, why I like Hercules.

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The full Nelson.

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If you keep it here, doesn't hurt the full Nelson.

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If you hook it here and push them back this way really hard.

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Ah, true,

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true, true, true.

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Um, the Campbell clutch really hearts.

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So does Rick Martel's Boston crap?

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Yes.

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So the Boston crab, I think really hurts.

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Um, and then you get into like, I mean, the Razor's edge is nuts,

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like little bit later, like great.

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That's a crazy.

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Powerful, but I, I would say Jake, the snake Roberts DDT.

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Yes.

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A hundred percent the shake, rattle and roll.

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Do you know what that stands for

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the DDT?

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Yeah, I don't actually.

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What does

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it say for dynamic downward

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thrust?

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That's epic.

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I should've known that those are the ones that stand out.

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Okay.

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Best entrance music.

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Um,

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demolition.

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Oh, here, come to me.

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Hold on a second.

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Demolition or Legion of doom.

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Demolition

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hero comes to the.

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Here comes the smash demo list and, uh, walking does that, like,

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that was, that was insane again.

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I mean, this is all part of why I loved him.

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Macho.

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Man's done

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that was absurd.

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You know, Hogan's, I'm real American still touches me.

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I am a real, uh, um, that those are the ones, but demolition for me.

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Big,

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I'm partial to stone cold boy,

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you know, that's smashing of the glass.

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That's an incredible entrance.

Speaker:

It just comes out of nowhere to get hyped.

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I don't think anything from that epic attitude era, which brought on the other

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most iconics, the rocks and stone Coles.

Speaker:answers because there is this:Speaker:

that just completely penetrates my soul.

Speaker:

That I always have to

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talk about.

Speaker:

That's that's how I emailed your team.

Speaker:I was like summer slam:Speaker:

It was the subject line because the mega powers collide.

Speaker:

And I was like, that was a big one.

Speaker:

So I was going to stick to wrestling for a second.

Speaker:

Who on earth, if you were to wrestle, could you potentially be out of anyone

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that's ever been in WWE or another?

Speaker:

Probably only Steve Lombardi or Barry Hart.

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Or canine or iron Mike Sharp.

Speaker:

The guys who got beat up on Saturday, these were all Saturday morning.

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Remember when wrestling had the jobbers?

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The guys who just like lost every Saturday morning?

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Yes.

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Ferry Harwoods was the guy that patted himself on the back.

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Iron Mike Starr had like this like leather thing on a Sandy.

Speaker:

He'd be like, ah, they were like the jobbers, like the guys that got beat

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up and then later wrestling just became big headlines against each other, but

Speaker:

the way they would build up a gun.

Speaker:

When WWF was in its prime in the eighties was they would beat the crap out of these

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four losing wrestlers constantly, like almost like the Washington generals to the

Speaker:

Harlem globe Trotters a hundred percent.

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But the truth is none of them.

Speaker:

There's not a guy who's never gotten the squared circle and

Speaker:

WWE that I would be in arrested.

Speaker:

Saturday night's main event used to be like the biggest thing on earth.

Speaker:

For me, it was so like, it was like a parade.

Speaker:

It was unbelievable.

Speaker:

All right.

Speaker:

I got a one, a couple more wrestling questions and we're

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going to move on to some real shit.

Speaker:

This is real, but overrated, underrated.

Speaker:

I love your overrated underrated, except until I saw mustard.

Speaker:

I was like, what the fuck is happening right now, dude?

Speaker:

I don't even know what it's for, but all right.

Speaker:

Kurt angle, overrated, underrated, underrated.

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Cause he's like a legit wrestler.

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Cause he's a legit wrestler.

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Cause he carried a lot of fans for a long time because the last in his

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final match with grace at wrestling, I just like, I think he's a wrestlers.

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Wrestler did all the right things.

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He

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was hurt all the time.

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Like super, super, super hurt,

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hurt all the time.

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I have a lot of respect for him.

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Rowdy Roddy Piper, very underrated.

Speaker:

I actually would tell you the reason, I think rowdy Roddy Piper is very

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underrated is I don't think people actually understand how great of a

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job he did as a heel to really get people fired up for WrestleMania one.

Speaker:

When he kicked, he kicked Cindy lopper in the head that would be like kicking Taylor

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swift in the head in the square circle.

Speaker:

But like he, he knew how to get people riled up.

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And he was part of the crossover and he was whole Cogans arch-nemesis when

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wrestling crossed over to culture.

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And so he deserves a lot of credit for that.

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He also absolutely put on Bret the Hitman Hart.

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Yes.

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And, and I think that's an underrated move cause rowdy didn't really love putting

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people on early in his career, but in his mature state, what he did putting

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over Brett Hart is a very big deal.

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I agree.

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How about staying?

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You

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know, I was less of a WCW, you know, um, you know, guy and a guy I never

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really fell in love with sting.

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I would watch it a lot.

Speaker:

I, I just, I liked flare the four horsemen, some of the bad

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guys that are more ARN Anderson.

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Yeah.

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The four.

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Yeah, exactly.

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Davon Erickson.

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All of them.

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Those were, they were good.

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Loved staying the same way.

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I never loved, I have staying and the ultimate warrior in a very

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similar place where like a lot of people were infatuated with the maybe

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believer, not the full map mask.

Speaker:

Might've like the full makeup.

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Might've been an issue for me.

Speaker:

You know, what's crazy about that.

Speaker:

I've never said I never used that before.

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I just came to realize, you know, they were a tag team as kids, the ultimate

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warrior and sting we're tagging champions in a league called UWF and they were

Speaker:

known as the blade runners, I think, wait, let me Google this on you.

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WF

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heard that in my life at

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serious, I've got real knowledge blade runners with professional

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wrestling tag team that featured steep board and Jim hunt.

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There there look back at the music.

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1985 stinging.

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Yeah, they were the blade runners.

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Yep.

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That was the first

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year I ever picked up a wrestling magazine, $19.

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I remembered

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them as the blade runners when I was hardcore wrestling magazine guy.

Speaker:

Because he couldn't really watch those matches.

Speaker:

It's funny that I just made that connection.

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I never really got into either.

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And it's funny that their early success with was with

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all right, we are going to take a quick break.

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Now you heard me ask Gary one of the questions, which was the

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tipping point of an entrepreneur.

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And he said, hire now I had a COO I didn't need a fucking CEO.

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Okay.

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And don't get me wrong.

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Like, I'm not saying they weren't in that capacity, but like we weren't big enough

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to actually need a C suite anything.

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Okay.

Speaker:

I have a virtual assistant who is the most unbelievable hire and

Speaker:

it takes some time, but a virtual assistant is probably something you

Speaker:

should look at as your first hire.

Speaker:

Now, a virtual assistant is not managing your calendar, your emails, and all that.

Speaker:

There are virtual assistants who are specific.

Speaker:

Who are very specifically trained in certain functions or have

Speaker:

experience in certain functions that are going to benefit you.

Speaker:

So I'm going to tell you about my sponsor, who recently sponsored this

Speaker:

podcast and their name is rocket station.

Speaker:

Brocket station is where I found my virtual assistant Ellie who's off the

Speaker:

charts, rockstar, my COO, who I was mentioning, found a better opportunity.

Speaker:

Beyond your way and have fun.

Speaker:

Cool.

Speaker:

Well guess what Ellie has absorbed essentially all of

Speaker:

her duties without issue.

Speaker:

So if you want to start looking into VA, okay.

Speaker:

And these are Philippines based, which means they're probably going

Speaker:

to be at a rate of about $10 an hour.

Speaker:

Landing page is going to be discovered.

Speaker:

Dot rocket station.com.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

Or you can email Brooks, B R O O K s@rocketstation.com and just inquire

Speaker:

because this is literally what is the actual game changer in the business

Speaker:

is having the help you need the hours.

Speaker:

You need them trained in what you need them to be trained.

Speaker:

And just ready to freaking go.

Speaker:

So make the higher listen to what Carrie said.

Speaker:

It's not about how much you pay yourself.

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It's about how much you can serve others.

Speaker:

And the only way you're going to be able to serve others, there's better

Speaker:

is width to help you need, need good, reliable, affordable health.

Speaker:

And that's what you're going to get.

Speaker:

If you go to rocket station, doctor, back to the show, so you have.

Speaker:

My one life thing back there.

Speaker:

I have your clouds and dirt.

Speaker:

If I drank, I'd be drinking, empathy, wines.

Speaker:

I mean, branding personal branding is what I do.

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And like last time we met, I kind of told you, I'm like, I make content for

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CEOs, executives, and I try and just get them on filmmaking micro content.

Speaker:

There were people when you release V friends that I was texting with, who were

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like, I'm going into my savings account.

Speaker:

I don't even know what this shit is, but I know Gary and I trust Gary.

Speaker:

If anyone at this point is still reluctant in any way about the

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effect a personal brand can have.

Speaker:

What would you say to them after what you've just accomplished or are

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accomplishing in the midst of this?

Speaker:

That reputation has always been the singular most important asset to a human.

Speaker:

I mean, this is old school shit.

Speaker:

This is your grandfather's grandfather's grandfather would

Speaker:

believe in what I talk about.

Speaker:

Personal brand is a slang term for reference.

Speaker:

I built my reputation publicly, which is probably the swing on the term personal

Speaker:

brand at scale over the last 15 years.

Speaker:

And to your point, you know, and by the way, I don't know if you've been

Speaker:

following what's going on on crypto slam.

Speaker:

It's insane.

Speaker:

What's going on with the friends.

Speaker:

I have people who probably spend more money than I would have wanted to, because

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I was very consistent in the beginning.

Speaker:

I'm like, do not spend money.

Speaker:

You don't have, you know, cause this is an investment for some, but it's a ticket

Speaker:

to the conference for others, you know?

Speaker:

I mean, I'll just look at it right now.

Speaker:

Just to give people a context.

Speaker:

Somebody just bought a let's see, 18 minutes ago, an an honest honeybee for

Speaker:

3.4 Eve, the person who bought it, bought it for one, 2.4 each time, you know,

Speaker:

somebody just made $6,000 in two weeks.

Speaker:

That's unbelievable.

Speaker:

So I was watching a promo that I think Dera cut for it.

Speaker:

And you were like, I'm built for this.

Speaker:

And I got like chills.

Speaker:

Like there's a lot in that promo, but I'm like, I can't even explain

Speaker:

to you the amount of conviction.

Speaker:

You said that with then of course you meant it, but like, how do you know when

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you're built for something that has.

Speaker:

Even yet arrived.

Speaker:

Like there's a lot of people who ideate and they might be

Speaker:

like, shit, you know what?

Speaker:

Like, I don't even know about this.

Speaker:

I'm not smart enough about it yet, but you're like, chips are

Speaker:

in, this is the next 25 years.

Speaker:

How do you even get to that point?

Speaker:

Mentally

Speaker:

pattern recognition.

Speaker:

Self-awareness you know, I know who I am.

Speaker:

I know what I'm about.

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I know what I'm good at.

Speaker:

I'm 45 now.

Speaker:

So I'm not a kid.

Speaker:

I've had as long of a professional career as I've had a pre professional career.

Speaker:

And I know who I am and I just really know what I'm good at.

Speaker:

And it was so obvious to me that I just said it twice to you.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

It was so nice.

Speaker:

I had to say it twice if I was arrested, if I was arrested and I just, um, I,

Speaker:

listen, you, you follow me very closely.

Speaker:

I've talked at nausea about buying intellectual property,

Speaker:

refurbishing old brands.

Speaker:

And if these gave me a chance to stand up right.

Speaker:

To create IP instead of buying it.

Speaker:

If you look carefully at the of it, it's all just Gary V talking in character form,

Speaker:

all the V friends is empathy, empathy.

Speaker:

Elephant is just me, you know, accountable and theater is me accountable ant is me.

Speaker:

Right?

Speaker:

Like, you know, that's authentic Anaconda, right?

Speaker:

Those are things I believe in like, you know, forgiving, horned,

Speaker:

frog, you know, like that's huge.

Speaker:

Forgiveness is power.

Speaker:

These are all the things that I want to push on.

Speaker:

Humble hum.

Speaker:

Hummingbird.

Speaker:

Like I am listen.

Speaker:

It's fun that you brought it up.

Speaker:

Vince McMahon, Walt Disney, like Gary V from this day on, is

Speaker:

probably going to over the next decade, take more of a backseat.

Speaker:

I'm going to become more Vince McMahon then right now I'm whole Cogan.

Speaker:

But over the next decade, vibrato is going to allow me to be Vince

Speaker:

McMahon and let patient Panda and empathy elephant become whole.

Speaker:

Stephanie McMahon and triple H essentially like the way they came in.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

I want to be

Speaker:

behind.

Speaker:

I want to be behind the scenes with a little bit on the scenes and

Speaker:

you know, I don't have to Gary be in as much over the next decade.

Speaker:

It's going to be V friends doing the work for me on what I want for humanity.

Speaker:

I've never, I never thought I'd hear you say something like that.

Speaker:

Well, you know, that's because that's because I think a lot of people

Speaker:

don't realize that Gary V for me as a vehicle, 'cause I, I know it's a vehicle

Speaker:

that will work, but don't forget.

Speaker:

I was 30 years old before I made a video.

Speaker:

I never wanted to be famous or known, or I don't have a need for that.

Speaker:

I don't mind it.

Speaker:

I enjoy people.

Speaker:

So it makes it very easy, but I'm a businessman, not a celebrity.

Speaker:

And so Gary D was a necessity because it was the vehicle that I saw was obvious

Speaker:

to build leverage for my businesses, but it's not necessarily what I need or want.

Speaker:

When you end up honing the jets, is there any way that you can fail?

Speaker:

Probably

Speaker:

not.

Speaker:

Why?

Speaker:

I just think it's too obvious to me why the Lakers and the

Speaker:

Patriots and the Yankees did well.

Speaker:

That's why, because it's fucking clear crystal clear.

Speaker:

I just think I know what it takes to be an, I think I am.

Speaker:

The human being that knows how to build a championship sports organization and a

Speaker:

media company and anything I touch, right?

Speaker:

Like, like my things work because they're all in the same game,

Speaker:

which is it's about people.

Speaker:

It's about giving it's about seeing the power.

Speaker:

And again, why.

Speaker:

You know why this project is so exciting to me, right.

Speaker:

When I look at I'm just clicking around on it, rational, rattlesnake, right?

Speaker:

Or respectful raccoon or reliable rats, or, you know, any of these things, they're

Speaker:

just, you know, juggle lion, right?

Speaker:

Like loyalty.

Speaker:

These are all the things that take to build a sports organization.

Speaker:

Not cynical, not impatient, not there's all these words.

Speaker:

Well, let me ask you this, then I've been thinking about this.

Speaker:

Uh, I mean, I hardly prepared for this because I'm like, I

Speaker:

just want to talk to Gary man.

Speaker:

So thinking today, when you look at college football and then you look at the

Speaker:

NFL, like there's a difference, right?

Speaker:

There's money, there's personalities, and there's all that you might

Speaker:

have dudes who don't give a shit about winning a championship.

Speaker:

And they're happy that their family is going to be taken care of that they could

Speaker:

buy their mom, a house, all that stuff.

Speaker:

What happens when those guys were in your locker?

Speaker:

I want that for them too.

Speaker:

I don't want them to do anything, but do what's right for them.

Speaker:

However, because I'm on the other side of this with banner sports.

Speaker:

So I know it to be very true, which is why it's been a good testing ground for me.

Speaker:

When we interview kids, especially for our first two round picks, mom gonna

Speaker:

want to know that they're the kind of kid that loves to compete like that.

Speaker:

They want to win in a video game more than breathing that they cried

Speaker:

when they lost in little league.

Speaker:

Being competitive is a competitive advantage.

Speaker:

So I don't need a man.

Speaker:

And maybe, you know, by the way, I've been looking at a female,

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a women's sports team recently.

Speaker:

So I don't, you know, I may have some destiny in that world.

Speaker:

I don't need a man or a woman to be anything that they're not, it's

Speaker:

my job to draft and hire people that by nature are more into women.

Speaker:

Then they are into fame off the field, but I want them to have everything they want.

Speaker:

In addition to trying to win at all costs.

Speaker:

That is legally unfair.

Speaker:

Do you feel like I just read this book by Tim Grover is ridiculous.

Speaker:

And I was thinking about you because he just talks about

Speaker:

how winning is everything.

Speaker:

It's just, it's insane how he talks about Michael and Kobe.

Speaker:

And I was thinking about you and I'm like, when, when you're going to be

Speaker:

around some of these people, is there any, any chance that your grit and desire

Speaker:

to win at all costs and that your work ethic had you worked in 18 hour days

Speaker:

not taking a summer off or anything like that for years upon years upon years.

Speaker:

Ends up being, uh, you know, some of the expectations you expect of your players.

Speaker:

Like, are you going to be that guy?

Speaker:

Who's like, dude,

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I'm not, no, no, I'm not because I'll tell you why.

Speaker:

When I stopped wanting to work 18 hour days, Summers I did.

Speaker:

I think, you know, for me, I go the way I go, cause it's my hobby.

Speaker:

Like you have to love ball is what I would say, right?

Speaker:

Like it's my job to draft the kid out of Oregon or Nebraska or

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Miami or temple who loves ball.

Speaker:

It's not a kid's job to start loving ball because he now plays for me.

Speaker:

So you see where I'm going, Richard?

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It's mine.

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It's my responsibility.

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I went and interviewed your friend, Andy Frisella recently.

Speaker:

And we spent a lot of great time talking man.

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And one thing we talked about with you, and I told him about the first time I ever

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sat down with you, I'm like Gary's eyes were locked on me the entire fucking time.

Speaker:

And I was like, this dude is one of the busiest, one of the

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busiest dudes on the planet.

Speaker:

He goes, he knew, you knew that he goes, he knew how you would feel.

Speaker:

Getting all his attention.

Speaker:

And he goes, everyone says the same thing about you.

Speaker:

But the funny thing was he says, but we fundamentally

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disagree on a couple of things.

Speaker:

And it's a funny argument, but he's loves his jet.

Speaker:

He loves his cars and he loves all this other stuff.

Speaker:

But

Speaker:

I think we don't fundamentally agree.

Speaker:

I think it's a nuance.

Speaker:

I think he actually does.

Speaker:

I don't think I've done a good enough job.

Speaker:

I won't put this on Andy.

Speaker:

I'll put it on myself.

Speaker:

I love when people like, I know people who genuinely want.

Speaker:

A watch and they like, look, cause they understand the craftsmanship.

Speaker:

No, I genuinely love sitting court side at a basketball game.

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It's very expensive.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

I think that could end these credit.

Speaker:

I don't think I've done a good enough job in clarifying my observation,

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which is unfortunately I believe that a staggering percentage of people.

Speaker:

Who she and manipulate or stay impatient or grind or treat people

Speaker:

poorly so they can get a jet or using that jet or watch her car.

Speaker:

To close insecurities.

Speaker:

They need those things to show people that they're successful.

Speaker:

And so I think, I think Andy, cause I know him a little bit

Speaker:

genuinely enjoy those things.

Speaker:

The way that I genuinely enjoy a $300 custom basketball Jersey of a weird player

Speaker:

that nobody should own a play Jersey on.

Speaker:

But that to me is my flex.

Speaker:

Like I'm a bigger fan than you.

Speaker:

And so I think, I think he's right for him.

Speaker:

And I think I'm, I believe it's why I say it.

Speaker:

I believe I'm right.

Speaker:

But there's too many people that buy things.

Speaker:

To use as a band-aid as a cloth, as a costume to hide their insecurity,

Speaker:

they need people to think they're successful and that's why they buy those

Speaker:

things and post it on social media.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

You're, as you're saying this, I'm like, I haven't bought a new

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shirt or shorts in like fucking years since I've been doing this.

Speaker:

Like it's, I just don't even think about that stuff.

Speaker:

I think to Andy's point, I think people should enjoy the fruits of

Speaker:

their, like, I would argue one of my weaknesses is my lack of desire

Speaker:

to smell roses and I'm trying to be better at it at the same token.

Speaker:

I do think items.

Speaker:

Why do you have a lack of smelling roses?

Speaker:

Cause I don't like

Speaker:

the winning.

Speaker:

I like

Speaker:

the process Tim Grover said winning will throw a party in your honor

Speaker:

and stick you with the bill.

Speaker:

It just disappears.

Speaker:

It's to me, it's also, you know, I secretly prefer to be booed.

Speaker:

I'd prefer to be the underdog.

Speaker:

I like that.

Speaker:

A lot of people who really know me didn't buy a single V.

Speaker:

Brent.

Speaker:

I love that.

Speaker:

I support you, like no one else.

Speaker:

And I was like, I can't like this doesn't even make sense for me right now.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And for me, anybody that has, when they were sitting at 0.5, Ethereum,

Speaker:a K:Speaker:

ever benefited from me or knows me?

Speaker:

How do they not see what I see?

Speaker:

And sure enough, two weeks later, those same point fives are for Ethereum.

Speaker:

You know, three and a half, but you're talking about a $10,000

Speaker:

profit on a thousand or 12 or $1,400 purchase in two weeks.

Speaker:

You know, that excites me because I like sticking it to anybody who, you know,

Speaker:

underestimated me because to your point, especially those who have benefited

Speaker:

from years of me, for them to have any reservation, that this was good for me

Speaker:

and not for them, is them continuing the journey of completely misunderstanding.

Speaker:

By the way rich.

Speaker:

I'm not trust me when I tell you for sure.

Speaker:

This is what's so great about having my chemicals.

Speaker:

I'm not actually miffed or mad or razzed by you.

Speaker:

It's like the color, like the energy that drives me of underdog status to be Frank.

Speaker:

It makes me sad.

Speaker:

I wanted more people in my, you know, how many people could really use taking

Speaker:

1300 bucks and turning into $10,000.

Speaker:

Like to me, fuck me.

Speaker:

I don't give a shit.

Speaker:

I'm good.

Speaker:

It was that I knew what was going to happen, but I'm pumped because

Speaker:

most of the people that did buy are my hardest core blindest faith.

Speaker:

And they're benefiting right now and I'm reading the discord every second.

Speaker:

And like, this is changing people's lives in a great way in the short term.

Speaker:

And I feel incredibly accomplished in it.

Speaker:

I think one of the smartest things you did, and not only with the

Speaker:

discord, but all the articles, 1:37 PM put out, um, just educating

Speaker:

people is something I haven't seen a lot going on in terms of NMT.

Speaker:

So I thought you guys crushed that, but, um, look, I'm, I'm always going to be

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respectful of your time, but I, I need to just tell you, man, like you changed my

Speaker:

entire fucking life people in my circle.

Speaker:

You've done the same thing for all of us.

Speaker:

And, and you led me to a place I didn't know existed.

Speaker:

I, I, you know, I'm the Marine guy.

Speaker:

I didn't know.

Speaker:

I thought being a first generation American men, like just outperform

Speaker:

your parents, just get a good job and that's it just work hard.

Speaker:

That's it?

Speaker:

Like, I didn't know, business.

Speaker:

Having a business was actually a thing.

Speaker:

I didn't know, sacrificing like way after I thought I sacrificed and.

Speaker:

You know what I'm saying?

Speaker:

Like, of course I'm in deeper sacrifice than I've ever been in my life.

Speaker:

And I'm the best I've ever been up here.

Speaker:

And I just turned 40

Speaker:

last year.

Speaker:

Well, first of all, you look 32.

Speaker:

Second of all, it makes me happy.

Speaker:

And third of all, I appreciate this.

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I promise you this, if you really knew me.

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And I think you may have read on this, cause I know how much around you are.

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Those words fulfill me and as a bigger gift than ever buying a

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fucking deep breath and give up.

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So thank you for that.

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Thank you, Gary.

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All right, everyone.

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Thank you for listening.

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Look, if you're new to the show, you're going to be like, what was that maybe,

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or maybe you were like, holy shit.

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Some great takeaways.

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I mean, it's almost impossible not to have takeaways when Gary's on, but look,

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listen to some other episodes if you're, uh, if you're new here and if you've been

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here, uh, I hope that didn't throw you off in any way, but Gary, Gary came, uh,

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he brought the, brought it as he usually does, and he was just sincere, man.

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Everything is an extension of how he is built.

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Who else do you know, kind of productizes positivity.

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I mean, it's insane.

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So I hope you enjoyed it.

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Come back for more, come back off and subscribe.

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If you haven't and please leave a review.

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Share this with a friend, leave a review, share with a friend, leave a review,

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share with a friend because that's what helps us podcast continue to get

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ranked and reach other entrepreneurs or potential business owners like you.

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And if you're not in any of those categories, I bet you're still

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getting good information because a lot of people DM me on LinkedIn

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and it's all the time being like, dude, I listened to this episode.

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That was ridiculous.

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Keep it going.

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Let's keep it moving.